Category Social Sciences Forum

march-14-ss-forum

Silent Partners: Women as Investors in Britain’s First Stock Market, 1690-1750

Social Sciences Forum
“Silent Partners: Women as Investors in Britain’s First Stock Market, 1690-1750”
Amy Froide, UMBC Associate Professor and Acting Chair of History
Tuesday, March 14, 4 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

One of the world’s first stock markets emerged in the coffeehouses of London in the 1690s. Up to one third of investors in corporations such as the East India and South Sea companies, the Bank of England, and the national debt were women. Prof. Froide discusses how these women learned to invest, how they served as financial agents and brokers for kin and others, and the types of financial agency that women exercised. (Click heading for full description.)

march-27-ss-forum

The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment: A Tragedy of Race and Public Health

Social Sciences Forum
“The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment: A Tragedy of Race and Public Health”
James Jones, Professor, University of Arkansas
Monday, March 27, 4 p.m.
University Center Ballroom

From 1932 until 1972, the United States Public Health Service (PHS) conducted a deadly, deceptive, and unethical medical experiment on more than 400 poverty stricken, poorly educated African-American sharecroppers in and around Tuskegee, the county seat of Macon County, nestled in the heart of Alabama’s “black belt.” Professor Jones will explain how the experiment got started, how it could have gone on for forty years, and how it reflected salient aspects of the history of race relations in the United States. (Click heading for full description.)

april-5-ss-forum

Bringing the São José Back into Memory

Social Sciences Forum – Low Lecture
“Bringing the São José Back into Memory”
Paul Gardullo, Curator, National Museum of African American History and Culture
Wednesday, April 5, 4 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library 7th floor

“From No Return” – Dr. Gardullo’s talk will focus on the complex ongoing vectors of collaborative international research, archaeology, and memory work in investigating the voyage of the São José, a Portuguese slave ship. (Click heading for full description.)

april-18-ss-forum

Globalization, Displacement, and Migration

Social Sciences Forum
“Globalization, Displacement, and Migration”
Aviva Chomsky, Professor of History, Salem State University
Tuesday, April 18, 4:30 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library 7th floor

This presentation will examine histories of Latin American immigration, migration, and deportation in the United States. It locates the structural and institutional roots of today’s Mexican and Central American migration to the United States in a number of historical global processes. (Click heading for full description.)

april-27-ss-forum

Implicit Social Cognition

Social Sciences Forum
“Implicit Social Cognition”
Mahzarin Banaji, Harvard University
Thursday, April 27, 4 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

How deep are the bounds on human thinking and feeling and how do they shape social interactions and decisions? For the past 25 years, Dr. Banaji has studied mental processes that appear to operate without conscious awareness or conscious control. (Click heading for full description.)

may-1-ss-forum

The Persistence of Racial Inequality: An Intergenerational Perspective

Social Sciences Forum – Mullen Lecture
“The Persistence of Racial Inequality: An Intergenerational Perspective”
Robert Mango, Professor of Economics, Boston University
Monday, May 1, 4 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library 7th floor

New benchmark estimates of Black-White income ratios for 1870, 1900, and 1940 are combined with standard post-World War census data. The resulting time series reveals that the pace of racial income convergence has generally been steady but slow, quickening only during the 1940s and the modern Civil Rights era. (Click heading for full description.)

anne-sarah-rubin

Confederate Hunger: Food and Famine in the Civil War South

Humanities Forum — Social Sciences Forum — Lipitz Lecture
“Confederate Hunger: Food and Famine in the Civil War South”
Anne Sarah Rubin, Professor of History and Associate Director of the Imaging Research Center, UMBC
Wednesday, May 3, 4 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Historians know that over the course of the American Civil War, the Confederacy essentially starved to death, a result of the Union blockade, the breakdown of slavery on the homefront, and not enough food being grown. What we don’t know, however, is what that felt like for ordinary people — on the most intimate and individual scale. “Confederate Hunger” explores the ways that the war affected what people ate and how food choices became symbols of nationalism, resistance, and survival. This project looks at food and hunger from the perspectives of white Southern civilians, African Americans, and Confederate soldiers. It moves from the cabins of yeoman farmers, through plantation kitchens, army messes, and contraband refugee camps, from 1861 through the 1866 harvest. (Click heading for full description.)