Category Humanities

UMBC at Light City Baltimore

Interdisciplinary
UMBC at Light City Baltimore
March 31 – April 8
Baltimore City

With art, ideas and entertainment, UMBC adds spark to Light City Baltimore! Join us on Saturday, April 1 from 8 to 11 p.m. at the Black and Gold Lounge food and drink, and pick up some glow-in-the-dark swag! Enjoy artworks by UMBC’s Eric Dyer and Timothy Nohe, visit the UMBC Spark gallery on Calvert Street, hear talks on innovation from President Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, and other at the Labs@LightCity, and much more! (Click heading for full description.)

A Conversation About Digital Access

Humanities Forum — Daphne Harrison Lecture
“A Conversation About Digital Access”
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress
Thursday, April 13, 5:30 p.m.
Earl and Darielle Linehan Concert Hall

Dr. Carla Hayden will discuss the importance of the Library of Congress in the 21st century, especially in the digital age. The Library houses more than 162 million items that include historical documents and artifacts, photographs, books, manuscripts, sheet music, and so much more. Her monumental goal is to share all these items online with the public from coast to coast. (Click heading for full description.)

Globalization, Displacement, and Migration

Social Sciences Forum
“Globalization, Displacement, and Migration”
Aviva Chomsky, Professor of History, Salem State University
Tuesday, April 18, 4:30 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library 7th floor

This presentation will examine histories of Latin American immigration, migration, and deportation in the United States. It locates the structural and institutional roots of today’s Mexican and Central American migration to the United States in a number of historical global processes. (Click heading for full description.)

Confederate Hunger: Food and Famine in the Civil War South

Humanities Forum — Social Sciences Forum — Lipitz Lecture
“Confederate Hunger: Food and Famine in the Civil War South”
Anne Sarah Rubin, Professor of History and Associate Director of the Imaging Research Center, UMBC
Wednesday, May 3, 4 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Historians know that over the course of the American Civil War, the Confederacy essentially starved to death, a result of the Union blockade, the breakdown of slavery on the homefront, and not enough food being grown. What we don’t know, however, is what that felt like for ordinary people — on the most intimate and individual scale. “Confederate Hunger” explores the ways that the war affected what people ate and how food choices became symbols of nationalism, resistance, and survival. This project looks at food and hunger from the perspectives of white Southern civilians, African Americans, and Confederate soldiers. It moves from the cabins of yeoman farmers, through plantation kitchens, army messes, and contraband refugee camps, from 1861 through the 1866 harvest. (Click heading for full description.)