Spring 2014

tumblr_m5ay7ffVDg1qattqzo1_500Visual Arts
Monday, January 27 – Sunday, March 23
N. Jay Jaffee Photographs from Public to Personal, 1947–1997
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

In distinctive black and white photographs of people and cityscapes N. Jay Jaffee (1921–1999), a one-time student of Sid Grossman of Photo League fame in New York, simultaneously captured the intimate and the abstract, the momentary and timeless, in exquisite expositions of lights and shadow, visual textures and balanced tension. City streets, subways, signs, markets and the people who inhabited them—documenting these very public spheres was actually a form of self-portrait, a means by which Jaffee interpreted both the world and his position in it at various times throughout his life. As such, his photographs are imbued with a subtle wit and humor, and a profound understanding of the ironies in all of our lives. They suggest a reaching out, inviting us to see and to question with a readied camera and an innocent eye.

Large and small museums, galleries, institutions and private collections around the world have collected Jaffee’s work, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, the International Museum of Photography and Film (George Eastman House), the Smithsonian Institution, the National Portrait Gallery, the National Museum of American Art, the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library, the Bibliotheque Nationale de France and the Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris), among others.

This exhibition will present 70 photographs spanning the career of N. Jay Jaffee, selected from the more than one hundred photographs that comprise the N. Jay Jaffee Collection, acquired by the UMBC Photography Collections in 2013.

The Gallery is open Monday through Friday, 10 am to 4 pm, on Thursday until 8 pm, and Saturday and Sunday 1 – 5 pm.  Admission is free. For more information call 410-455-2270.

On Thursday, February 27, please join us for a public program at which Jaffee’s works will be discussed by Christy Ford Chapin (assistant professor, Department of History) and Tom Beck (chief curator of the Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery and affiliate professor of Visual Arts), time to be announced.

Click here to view directions and parking information.

Image: N. Jay Jaffee, Two Women on the Subway, 1951.


jazzensemble02-sMusic
Sunday, February 2 | 3:00 p.m.
UMBC Jazz In Concert
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents UMBC Jazz in Concert under the direction of Matthew Belzer. The program will feature:

  • Interloper by Thad Jones
  • Upa Nêguinho by Edu Lôbo and Gianfrancesco Guarnieri, arranged by Rui Carvalho
  • Epistrophy by Thelonious Monk and Kenny Clarke
  • Moanin’ by Charles Mingus

Admission is free, suggested donation $15.


OVERLORD_FLIERVisual Arts
Wednesday, February 5
Visibility Machines Film Program: Overlord
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture presents a two-night film program curated by Sonja Simonyi in conjunction with the exhibition Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen. For this evening, Harun Farocki has chosenOverlord (Stuart Cooper, 1975, United Kingdom, b&w, 95 minutes, 35mm) and Inextinguishable Fire (Harun Farocki, 1969, b&w, 21 mins, digital transfer of 16mm).

The 1975 film Overlord places warfare in a fictional framework, evoking questions on the different ways in which archival footage can be incorporated into new filmic material to provide a thoughtful reconstruction of war. While Farocki does not approach the theme of war in a narrative context, issues relating to the visual representation of military strikes, and the formal strategies employed to construct such images, provide useful links to Farocki’s filmmaking as well. Meticulously researched, and using carefully selected footage from the film archives of the Imperial War Museum in Great Britain, Overlord follows a young soldier’s experiences of the Allied Forces’ D-Day invasion of Normandy during the Second World War. The striking aesthetic quality of the film was achieved by matching the archival material with live-action scenes shot with period lenses and stock footage from the 1930s.Overlord will be preceded by Farocki’s seminal essay-film Inextinguishable Fire, which powerfully dissects the connections between napalm bombings during the Vietnam War and diverging corporate and industrial interests that lie at the basis of the chemical’s destructive use by the US Army. As Farocki suggests, links between production, labor, and the ultimate implementation of a given product in warfare have been successfully separated and obfuscated in contemporary capitalist society.

This screening is presented in association with the Center for Advance Media Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and will be held at JHU’s Shriver Hall, 3400 N. Charles Street in Baltimore City. Admission is free.


_DSC4886Dance
Thursday – Saturday, February 6 – 8
8:00 p.m. each evening
Baltimore Dance Project
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

Baltimore Dance Project returns to UMBC for its 31st year, featuring three new pieces set to original scores by Ferdinand Maisel and Timothy Nohe. Doug Hamby illuminates the landscape of interaction and touch as six dancers affect sound with wearable sensors; Carol Hess fuses technology with dance in a responsive environment that includes the Kinect gaming system; and award-winning dancer Sandra Lacy premieres an engaging, mysterious solo created in collaboration with Mariah Maloney. Part of the 2014 Baltimore County Dance Celebration, the program features the text of Gertrude Stein, the music of Venetian Snares, and guest artist Trent Williams will perform Standing In, a new solo work in progress examining perspectives of black masculinity.

$20 general admission, $10 students and seniors, $7 UMBC students.

Purchase tickets online at MissionTix.com, or at the door (cash or check only).

Photo by Marlayna Demond for UMBC.

BaltCoDance-Logo no tagThese performances are part of the Baltimore County Dance Celebration. Learn about the month long festival of performances, workshops and activities at the websites for Company E and The Gordon Center for Performing Arts.


Skipjack bow with icicles

Visual Arts
Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery
February 10 – March 4
Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery Rotunda

In conjunction with the March 4 Humanities Forum presentation of Tom Horton and Dave Harp, an exhibition of photographs by Dave Harp, The Living Edge: Delights of the Chesapeake Bay, will be on display in the Rotunda of the Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery.

The Library is open Monday – Thursday, 8:00 a.m. through 12:00 midnight; Friday 8:00 a.m. through 6:00 p.m.; Saturday 10:00 a.m. through 6:00 p.m.; and Sunday 12:00 noon through 12:00 midnight.

Admission is free.


11167654_800Africana Studies, Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery, Humanities Forum
Monday, February 10 | 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Sponsored by the Department of Africana Studies and the Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery, and co-sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

The Loving Story, a documentary film, is a moving account of Richard and Mildred Loving, who were arrested in 1958 for violating Virginia’s ban on interracial marriage. Their struggle culminated in the 1967 landmark Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia. The film was directed by Nancy Buirski and produced by Nancy Buirski and Elisabeth Haviland James.

Though often overlooked among the pantheon of civil rights stories, Mildred and Richard Loving’s quest to live together as husband and wife in the state of Virginia was a pivotal struggle. A white man and a part black, part Cherokee woman were in love and did not understand why their marriage was a criminal offense in the eyes of state. There are few Supreme Court rulings that have had the impact that the Loving case had on our culture and politics: In 1967, the year of Loving v. Virginia, sixteen states had laws against interracial marriage.

Admission to this event is free.

View HBO’s official trailer for the film:

Africana Studies, Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery, Humanities Forum
Tuesday, February 11 | 4:30 – 6:00 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Sponsored by the Department of Africana Studies and the Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery, and co-sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

This panel discussion will be led by Dr. Claudrena N. Harold, an associate professor of History at the University of Virginia, and co-director of the short film Sugarcoated Arsenic. She specializes in African American history, black cultural politics and labor history, and is the author of The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South (2007), which chronicles the history of Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association from the perspective of black women and men living below the Mason-Dixon Line.

Admission to this event is free.

This discussion is sponsored in part by the The Created Equal Program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, which encourages public conversations about the changing meanings of freedom and equality in America. The Created Equal Program is part of the NEH Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.


TENSKIES_FLIER_SIMPLE_100Visual Arts
Tuesday, February 11 | 6:00 p.m.
Visibility Machines Film Program: Ten Skies
Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus (off-campus event)

The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture presents a two-night film program curated by Sonja Simonyi in conjunction with the exhibition Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen. For this evening, Trevor Paglen has chosen Ten Skies (James Benning, 2004, United States, color, 109 minutes, 16mm) and Drone Vision (Trevor Paglen, 2010, United States, b&w, 5 minutes, video).

Trevor Paglen’s selection, James Benning’s Ten Skies, shows the skies and the continuous shifts in cloud formations above and around Val Verde, a small town in California. A formally rigorous work, it documents the effects of the physical transformation of the landscape below, brought about by natural processes as well as marks of human intrusion into the setting, such as wildfires and industrial pollution. This poetic experimental film, displaying a series of static shots, provides evocative links with Paglen’s work, for whom the sky frequently becomes an abstracted sphere in which one can probe, and potentially detect traces of military activity. Importantly, despite the seemingly unassuming subject matter of Ten Skies, Benning has repeatedly highlighted its political significance as an “anti-war artwork … about the antithesis of war, the kind of beauty we’re destroying.” The screening will follow Paglen’s video Drone Vision, which shows images as recorded by a momentarily aimless drone, as the machine eerily mimics the wandering motions of human vision.

This screening is presented in association with the Center for Advance Media Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and will be held at:

The AV Center, Milton S. Eisenhower Library
Johns Hopkins Homewood Campus
3400 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218

Admission is free.


tremblay

Music
Sunday, February 16 | 4:00 p.m.
Chamber Concert featuring Violinist Christian Tremblay
Fine Arts Recital Hall

A chamber music concert featuring Christian Tremblay, Violin. The program will include:

  • Duo for Violin and Cello, Op. 7 by Zoltán Kodály (Violin: Christian Tremblay, Cello: Alicia Ward)
  •                Allegro serioso, non troppo
  •                Adagio
  •                Maestoso e largamente, ma non troppo lento: Presto
  • Suite from L’Histoire du Soldat by Igor Stravinsky (Violin: Christian Tremblay, Clarinet: E. Michael Richards, Piano: Audrey Andrist)
  •           Marche du Soldat
  •           Le Violon du Soldat
  •           Petit Concert
  •           Tango-Valse-Rag
  •           Danse du Diable
  • Piano Trio in B-flat major, Op. 97 “Archduke” by Ludwig van Beethoven (Violin: Christian Tremblay, Cello: Alicia Ward, Piano: Audrey Andrist)
  •           Allegro moderato
  •           Scherzo (Allegro)
  •           Andante cantabile ma però con moto. Poco piu adagio.
  •           Allegro moderato – Presto

Tremblay has been heard in many Canadian cities including Ottawa, Montreal and Quebec City as a soloist, recitalist, chamber musician and orchestra player. In the United States, Christian Tremblay has notably performed recitals in New York, Baltimore and Washington D.C. After a performance at the French Embassy in Washington D.C., the late Joseph McLellan of the Washington Post called his playing “eloquent and technically flawless.”

In Europe, Christian Tremblay has been heard in recitals in Fontainebleau, and was invited to be concertmaster of the Orchestre de Chambre du Conservatoire Americain, under Philippe Entremont, for two consecutive summers.  He was also awarded a special prize for the best performance of a contemporary work during that festival. He has also performed in the Netherlands for the Holland Music sessions and in Singapore at the National University of Singapore for one of the opening concerts of the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music.

An enthusiastic orchestra player as well, Christian Tremblay has performed with various ensembles in Canada and the United States, including the Orchestra Symphonique de Québec, the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and the Annapolis Symphony where he is Principal Second Violin.


James-Early1Humanities Forum, American Studies
Tuesday, February 18 | 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
Constructing Heritage: A Panel Discussion
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities. Co-sponsored by the Department of American Studies.

The process of constructing heritage is inherently political. Whether displayed in a museum, protected as a site, or thought of in terms of shared, cultural knowledge passed down over time, heritage is identified, defined, and interpreted through policies that both shape its very nature and exclude that which is not. This forum marks the beginning of a series of ongoing, critical discussions on the mechanisms of constructing heritage and the power relations embedded within its enterprise, from international to local-level perspectives.

This panel discussion will feature:
James Counts Early (pictured), director of Cultural Heritage Policy, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Mariano Sto. Domingo, adjunct faculty, Department of Psychology
Michelle Stefano, folklorist in residence, Department of American Studies
Ashley Minner, Community Artist and Activist, Baltimore American Indian Center

Admission to this event is free.


Kendall-Kennison_DSC2937Music
Wednesday, February 19 | 12 Noon
Kendall Kennison, Composer-Pianist
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Composer Kendall Kennison will perform and discuss his recent piano music and the influence of his mentors. This program, which he is preparing for the Volvo Offroadfest Zagreb 2014 in Croatia, will include the premieres of Meditation (2011/13) and Izlet (2013-14) as well as performances of Rhapsody and Real Estate Rag from 2006.

Kendall Kennison teaches music theory and composition at Goucher College, where he is Associate Professor. The composer of dozens of pieces in genres, including chamber, solo, orchestral, choral, and opera, his music has been performed throughout the Northeast and Midwestern United States, as well as in Italy, Croatia, and Russia. He has written music at the request of performers and ensembles including Scottish Voices, pianist Lisa Weiss, guitarist Stanley Alexandrowicz, The New Horizons Chamber Ensemble, Duo Viardot, the Goucher Chamber Symphony, and the Goucher Opera Workshop. One of his interests is writing music inspired by visual art or literature, and this has led to collaborations with artists Allyn Massey and Bernhard Hildebrandt, as well as music inspired by painters Robert Motherwell and Richard Diebenkorn, and novelist C.P. Snow. His composition teachers include Robert Hall Lewis, Robert Moevs, Richard Wilson, and Annea Lockwood, and he is grateful to his first piano teacher, Alan D. Wingard, for introducing him to contemporary music in elementary school. In addition to his teaching duties at Goucher, he also coordinates the Ars Viva concert series, which has brought guest artists to Goucher from Russia, Italy, Germany, Austria, India, and all around the United States. He lives in Baltimore with his wife and three children.

Admission is free.


Anthony BaleMedieval and Early Modern Studies
Wednesday, February 19 | 4:00 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Sponsored by the Department of English and the Judaic Studies Program. Co-sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

Anthony Bale, professor of Medieval Studies, Birkbeck University of London, presents the Annual Medieval and Early Modern Studies Lecture on “Race and Its Medieval Prehistories: Jews and Stereotypes in Norwich and London, 1233.”

Bale has published widely on medieval literature, culture, and religion. In particular, his work has explored relations between Christians and Jews in medieval England. He has also edited and translated several medieval texts, and is currently working on The Book of Margery Kempe.

He has received fellowships from the Arts & Humanities Research Council, the British Academy, the Huntington Library, the Leverhulme Trust, the University of Michigan Frankel Institute, and the National Humanities Center. He is a current holder of the Philip Leverhulme Prize.

Admission is free.


Tennant-ConradVisual Arts
Thursday, February 20 | 1:30 p.m.
Hallwalls Archive: Golden Years
Center for Advanced Media Studies, Johns Hopkins University (off campus event)

A discussion with Carolyn Tennant, media arts director of Hallwalls and Tony Conrad, artist and professor at the University of Buffalo Center for Advanced Media Studies.

Hallwalls was founded on Buffalo’s West Side in late 1974 by a group of young visual artists, some of them still students at the time. Since its founding, numerous national and international artists have visited Hallwalls for performances, screenings, readings, panel discussions, and exhibitions. As early as 1977, Hallwalls received support from the New York State Council on the Arts to document its multidisciplinary activities using video. Early performances by Karen Finley, Ann Magnuson, Rachel Rosenthal, and Mike Kelley (among many others) are accessible now thanks to Hallwalls’ conservation efforts.

This discussion is one of several talks, films and performances in the series organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, Jump Over Timecurated by Joanna Raczynska (’98, Visual Arts) of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.  Jump Over Time looks at some creative uses of video documentation as an idiom and form used by media artists. When does the video documentation of an event shift from witness to evidence? If a performance is designed for the camera is the urgency, the live-ness, of the performance obliterated?  When the video maker’s intent is to re-present a specific historic period, action, or happening, can reenactments be considered documentation? Selected works as well as visiting artists and archivists will speak to the many ways archives—brimming with mediated experiences—that are critical to cultural determination, memory and practice.

Johns Hopkins University
Gilman Hall, Room 50

facultyquartet220


Clockwise from top left: Janice Jackson, Stephen Caracciolo, Lorriana Markovic, Joseph Regan

Music
Thursday, February 20 | 8:00 p.m.
Faculty Voice Recital
Fine Arts Recital Hall

A vocal quartet featuring UMBC faculty members, Stephen Caracciolo, Janice Jackson, Lorriana Markovic and Joseph Regan, joined by pianistNancy Beith. Their program will feature:

  • Liebeslieder Walzer, Op. 52 by Johannes Brahms
  • Scenes from the Bavarian Highlands, Op. 27 by Edward Elgar
  • Come Where My Love Lies DreamingBeautiful Dreamer and Some Folks by Stephen Foster
  • Drei Quartette, Op. 31 by Johannes Brahms

Stephen Caracciolo is a choral conductor recognized for his passionate artistry, creative teaching, and is a nationally known composer and arranger whose choral works have been performed throughout the United States and Europe. As a choral performer, he has sung masterworks with the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, Julliard School Orchestra, Indiana University Orchestra and the American Symphony under the batons of Robert Shaw, Zubin Mehta, Riccardo Muti, Kurt Masur, Erich Kunzel and James Levine. He currently performs as a professional bass at Washington National Cathedral.

Janice Jackson is a full-time voice teacher at UMBC and is also the Director of the UMBC Gospel Choir and Jubilee singers, who have performed abroad in Verona, Florence, Rome and Venice, Italy and St. Thomas, Tortola Virgin Islands.  She is also a faculty member of the New Shiloh Baptist Church School of Music. Jackson’s recent performances include a Christmas Concert Tour with Felicia Weathers in major concert halls of Germany, Denmark and Switzerland; the role of  “Mother” in Amahl and the Night Visitors with Municipal Opera; alto soloist in Rossini’s Stabat Mater with Stanley Thurston and the Heritage Signature Choral; and alto soloist in Vivaldi’s Gloria with the Maryland Cammerata and Jubilee Singers and the UMBC Symphony.

Lorriana Markovic, is an accomplished performer of opera, art song and oratorio, specializing in the interpretation of Russian vocal music. She is the recipient and winner of many awards and competitions including Vocal Arts Society Discovery Series in DC, Pittsburgh Concert Society, Concours d’Interprétation de Musique Tchèque et Slovaque in Montreal, a Russian Scholarship to study in Moscow from the University of Pittsburgh and has been presented in recital by The Steinway Society by WQED-FM, Pittsburgh. Markovic has performed throughout the United States, Europe and Russia. Locally, she has performed at the Walters Art Museum, BlackRock Center for the Arts, Music in the Great Hall and with the Opera Theater of Northern Virginia.

Joseph Regan can be seen on the opera stage where he has performed the roles of Fenton from Verdi’s Falstaff, Tamino from Mozart’s Magic Flute, Jenik from Smetana’s Bartered Bride and many more.  Regan is also an accomplished performer of musical theatre.  He has performed Henrik in Sondheim’s A Little Night Music, Nicely-Nicely Johnson from Loesser’s Guys and Dolls and has performed a number of cabaret and recital programs dedicated to the style.  In addition to his work in opera and musical theatre, Regan is a well known for his work in the field of oratorio.  He has sung Handel, Haydn, Mendelssohn, Mozart and is particularly notable for his expertise singing Bach.

Nancy Beith has been on the music faculty at UMBC since 1980, serving as academic advisor for the department, pianist for both the Camerata and Vocal Arts Ensemble, and coordinator of the class piano program. She taught for many years in the Preparatory Division of Hood College in Frederick, MD. As a collaborative pianist, Ms. Beith has worked with many area musicians in recital and chamber performances. She has adjudicated piano competitions for Maryland State Music Teachers Association and has been pianist for the International Trombone Workshop in Nashville. Currently she is a pianist for Holy Family Catholic Community in Middletown, MD and the Maryland State Boychoir in Baltimore. Ms. Beith co-founded a series of childrens’ educational music programs, Music for Little Ears, which have been presented in many local elementary schools. She was contracted by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra to arrange a piano reduction of the Victor Herbert Cello Concerto for rehearsal purposes in preparation for the American premiere performance with soloist Mihaly Virizlay. Ms. Beith received degrees from Syracuse University and the Peabody Institute. She also studied at the Vienna Academy of Music and Westminster Choir College in Princeton.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. Tickets will be available at the door, cash or check only.


effscreens copyAmerican Studies
Tuesday, February 25 | 4:00 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Sponsored by the Department of American Studies, the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery and the Friends of the Library & Gallery

Folklorist and author Elaine Eff will speak about her recently published book The Painted Screens of Baltimore: An Urban Folk Art Revealed.

Painted screens have long been synonymous in the popular imagination with the Baltimore rowhouse. At once picturesque, practical, and quirky, window and door screens adorned with scenic views simultaneously offer privacy and ventilation. As an urban folk art, painted screens flourished in Baltimore, though they did not originate here—precursors date to early eighteenth-century London. They were a fixture on fine homes and businesses in Europe and America throughout the Victorian era, but became an item for mass consumption in Baltimore where the folk art is still very much alive.

Eff, an authority on the subject of painted screens, has thoughtfully examined the roots of painted wire cloth, the ethnic communities where painted screens have been at home for a century, and the future of this art form. She is a curator and filmmaker who formerly served as the director of the cultural conservation program for the Maryland Historical Trust and as co-director of the Maryland Traditions program at the Maryland State Arts Council. She is the 2009 Botkin Prize recipient from the American Folklore Society and the founder of the Painted Screen Society.


Symphony Interactive interface

Symphony Interactive interface

Interdisciplinary
Wednesday, February 26 | 12 Noon
CIRCA Catalyst with presenters Linda Dusman and Eric Smallwood
Dresher Center Conference Room
(216, Performing Arts and Humanities Building)

UMBC Professor Linda Dusman of Music and Assistant Professor Eric Smallwood of Visual Arts will present their collaborative research onSymphony Interactive, a tablet application that re-envisions the traditional concert going experience. The presentation will discuss the history of the project, focusing on the unique challenges in regard to the information, graphic and interactive design of an “unobtrusive” application intended to heighten and enrich the experience of live musical performances.

Linda Dusman’s compositions and sonic art explore the richness of contemporary life, from the personal to the political. Her recently released solo CD I need no words contains sonic reflections on a variety of texts, from Joan Retallack to Emily Dickinson. Recent works include Interiors for solo piano, and Subterranea for percussion quartet. Her music has been awarded by the International Alliance for Women in Music, the State of Maryland (in both the Music: Composition and the Visual Arts: Media categories), and the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, among others. Her compositions are published by I Resound Press, and are recorded on the NEUMA, Capstone, and New Albany labels. Dr. Dusman is a Professor of Music at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).

Eric Smallwood is an artist, animator, filmmaker and educator. His inaugural solo exhibition, Tethered in the Weather at VisArts of Rockville (2013) exhibited video installations informed by an interest in the intersection of biology and memory as it relates to the building of personal narratives. As an emerging artist, his video and installation works have been screened or exhibited regionally at the Metro gallery, 5th Dimension gallery, and West North gallery in Baltimore. He has also presented at the School of Visual Arts Annual Conference on Liberal Arts and the Education of Artists in Ney York. As an assistant professor of animation and interactive media at UMBC, he teaches courses in the areas of 3D animation and digital compositing.

CIRCA Catalyst is an ongoing series promoting conversations around transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that fuses the performing and visual arts with other fields of inquiry and scholarship. A catered lunch, with vegetarian options, will be provided by CIRCA (the Center for Innovation, Research and Creativity in the Arts).

Admission is free.


jaffee02-360Visual Arts, History
Discussion on N. Jay Jaffee Photographs from Public to Personal, 1947-1997
Thursday, February 27 | 4:00 p.m.
Albin. O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Christy Ford Chapin, Assistant Professor of History, will shed light on the historical context in which Jaffee was active as a photographer, with emphasis on the Cold War, McCarthyism, and the dramatic changes that occurred from the late 1940s through the 1990s.

Tom Beck, Chief Curator of the Albin O. Kuhn Gallery, will discuss the life and work of photographer N. Jay Jaffee including: the influence of the Photo League the only arts group that was included on the United States Attoney General’s List of Subversive Organizations in 1947; Jaffee’s longtime muse—the streets of New York City; and the increasingly poetic and personal elements that characterize his later work.

This discussion is part of the exhibition currently on display in the Library Gallery, N. Jay Jaffee Photographs from Public to Personal, 1947-1997. This exhibition continues through Sunday, March 23.

Reception to follow. Admission to this event is free.


3Dprinter_printing_Jan2014Visual Arts & Technology
Monday, March 3 | 12 Noon – 1:00 p.m.
CIRCA Catalyst
With presenters Jan Baum and Eric Dyer
Dresher Center Conference Room (216 Performing Arts and Humanities Building)

CIRCA Catalyst is an ongoing series promoting conversations around transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that fuses the performing and visual arts with other fields of inquiry and scholarship. A catered lunch, with vegetarian options, will be provided by CIRCA (the Center for Innovation, Research and Creativity in the Arts).

Catalyst Program:
Towson University Professor Jan Baum is the Executive Director of 3D Maryland, a statewide leadership initiative to advance engagement with 3D digital tools. Her talk will focus on innovation with regard to rapid technologies such as 3D printing which have application across disciplines as well as the 3D Maryland initiative.

UMBC Associate Professor Eric Dyer creates films and installation art from a mix of animation, sculpture, and cinema. He will focus on recent projects and experiments that use digital fabrication to bring computer generated motion imagery into the ‘real’ world.

Presenter Bios:
Jan Baum is an innovator and evangelist for making the world a better place whether through technology, design, education, or business. An early adopter and passionate technologist she is always trying new things. As the Executive Director of 3D Maryland she is leading Maryland’s rapid tech ecosystem coordinating expertise and resources to build high-level engagement throughout Maryland across industries. As an educator with 20-years of experience Baum has developed leading edge curriculum from social design to digital fabrication, and traditional, digital, and hybrid and academic programs. She created Object Lab, a state-of-the-art rapid technology and digital fabrication at Towson University, and was a finalist for Smart CEO Leader in Technology award in 2012. Her own work has been exhibited and published internationally and is in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Museum of American Art. Baum presents and publishes regularly.

Eric Dyer is an artist, filmmaker, experimental animator, and educator. His award-winning films have screened internationally at numerous festivals, including the Chicago International Film Festival, the Ann Arbor Film Festival, South by Southwest, and the Ottawa, Annecy, Melbourne, and London International Animation Festivals. His work has also been exhibited at the Exploratorium, the Hirshhorn, the Smithsonian National Gallery of Art, Ars Electronica, and the Cairo and Venice Biennales.

He was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship in filmmaking for travel to Denmark in 2005, and was a New Frontier Artist at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival. As a member of the Visual Arts faculty at UMBC in Baltimore, he teaches animation and brings students and symphony orchestras together to create music visualizations and animation performances. In 2008 his students presented with the Brooklyn Philharmonic. He has taught workshops at institutions such as ECNU in Shanghai and CalArts. Dyer has received Animasivo, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and Ammerman Center for Art and Technology commissions, and has recently been awarded an Imaging Research Center Summer Research Fellowship, Creative Capital grant, and Guggenheim Fellowship. He is represented by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York.

Admission is free.


2011-September-4183-img-1Department of English, Humanities Forum
Tuesday, March 4 | 4:00 – 5:30 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Sponsored by the Department of English. Co-sponsored by the Departments of Geography and Environmental Systems, Biology and Public Policy; the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; and the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

Tom Horton (pictured) and Dave Harp, two of the nation’s best known environmental journalists, will speak on the state of the Chesapeake Bay, the country’s largest estuarine system, the drainage basin of which touches six states. Horton is the author of the critically-acclaimed Bay Country, which won the John Burroughs Award for the best book of nature writing in 1988, as well as the David Brower award from the Sierra Club. Harp’s magazine work has taken him from the coast of Normandy for a story on the 40th anniversary of D-Day, to western Australia for coverage of the America’s Cup, and to the tropical rain forests of Panama.

Admission to this event is free.

(Photo credit: Dave Harp.)


March4-kalVisual Arts
Artist Lecture with Kevin “Kal” Kallaugher
Tuesday, March 4 | 7:00 p.m.
The Skylight Room, UMBC Commons (3rd Floor next to the elevators)

In a lively and entertaining illustrated presentation, Kevin “Kal” Kallaugher will provide insight to his 35 year career as an international award winning cartoonist. Kal will discuss his unique and challenging profession, and his 8000 barbed commentaries that have engaged readers and leaders around the globe. The presentation will be capped off with live drawing of Kal’s favorite targets, plus a book signing of Kal’s newest collection, Daggers Drawn.

This event is part of UMBC’s annual ArtWeek, a week long celebration of the arts on campus, including fine arts, performance, music film, animation and sculpture, and includes a Visual Aid Exhibition displaying art work from students of all disciplines. Students may download an application for submission from the ArtWeek 14 website.


04Visual Arts
Thursday, March 6 | 3:00 p.m.
Brooke Singer, Visiting Artist Lecture
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Brooke Singer discusses her experience as an artist working in multimedia installation and interactivity. She engages technoscience as an artist, educator, nonspecialist and collaborator. Her work lives “on” and “off” line in the form of websites, workshops, photographs, maps, installations, public art and performances that often involves participation in pursuit of social change. She is associate professor of New Media at Purchase College, State University of New York, a former fellow at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center (2010-11) and co-founder of the art, technology and activist group Preemptive Media.


rge2Social Sciences Forum
Thursday, March 6 | 4:00 p.m.
“The Golden Age of Higher Education is Over”
Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Economics and Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery, 7th Floor

This event, the annual Mullen Lecture is sponsored by the Department of Economics.

Professor Ehrenberg will explain why the financial models under which both private and public higher education institutions are operating are breaking down and the actions they will have to take in the future to remain financially solvent and deliver high quality education to their students.

Ronald G. Ehrenberg is the Irving M. Ives Professor of Industrial and Labor Relations and Economics at Cornell University and a Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow. He also is Director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute. From 1995 to 1998 he served as Cornell’s Vice President for Academic Programs, Planning and Budgeting.

Ehrenberg served as an elected member of the Cornell Board of Trustees from 2006 to 2010. Governor David Paterson nominated him for membership on the SUNY Board of Trustees in May 2009. His appointment was confirmed by the New York State Senate in March 2010. He currently chairs the Board’s Academic Affairs Committee and is a member of its Executive, Communications and External Affairs, Finance and Administration, Research and Economic Development and system wide provost search committees.

Ehrenberg has served as a consultant to faculty and administrative groups and trustees at a number of colleges and universities on issues relating to tuition and financial aid policies, faculty compensation policies, faculty retirement policies, and other budgetary and planning issues. Among the institutions he has worked with are Brandeis University, Oberlin College, Northeastern University, The University of North Carolina, the University of Chicago, Vanderbilt University, the U.S. Naval Academy, the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology, Smith College, the Suffolk University Law School, Albany University (SUNY), George Washington University, the University of Akron, and the University of Vermont.

Admission is free.


jaysmooth1-thumb-640xauto-6137Humanities Forum
Thursday, March 6 | 7:30 p.m.
“On Hip Hop, Race and Politics: The Way we Talk about Things”
Jay Smooth, Hip hop culture critic, Ill Doctrine; and radio host, the Underground Railroad on WBAI 99.5 FM
University Center Ballroom

The annual Daphne Harrison Lecture is sponsored by Critical Social Justice, the Women’s Center; The Mosaic: Center for Culture and Diversity of the Division of Student Life; the Department of Africana Studies; and the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

In this talk, socio-political pundit Jay Smooth, the popular blogger behind Ill Doctrine, discusses everything from present-day politics and social justice to music, media, and culture. Smooth delves into the oftentimes-tricky discussion of race, specifically how we talk about race and racism as a culture, sharing thought-provoking, humorous, and entertaining suggestions for expanding our worldview on the subject. Jay Smooth is host of New York’s longest running hip-hop radio show, the Underground Railroad on WBAI 99.5 FM, and is an acclaimed commentator on politics and culture.

Admission is free.


02masaoka_koto_laserMusic
Thursday, March 6 | 8:00 p.m.
Miya Masaoka, koto and electronics
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Miya Masaoka resides in New York City and is a classically trained musician, composer and sound/installation artist. She has created works for solo koto, laser interfaces, laptop and video, sculpture installations and written scores for ensembles, chamber orchestra and mixed choirs. She has a large body of work for solo koto, live electronics and video. She often works with the sonification of data, and maps the behavior of brain activity, plants and insect movement to sound. Her work has been performed at the Venice Biennale 2004, the Miller Theater, NYC, Ircam, Paris and V2, Rotterdam. Awards and commissions include the Alpert Arts Award, Bang On a Can, Engine 27/Harvestworks, Gerbode Foundation.

Masaoka has been a koto soloist with Bang on a Can, Berkeley Symphony, The Torrance Symphony, New West Symphony, Toshiko Akiyohsi’s Jazz Orchestra and has led her own ensembles including the Masaoka Orchestra, the Miya Masaoka Trio with Andrew Cyrille and Reggie Workman, and collective ensembles sensor Chip with Pamela Z and Donald Swearingen, The Transliteration Trio with Amir El Safar and Samir Chattergee, Brew with Gerry Hemingway, Workman, and Maybe Monday with Fred Frith and Larry Ochs and Joan Jeanrenaud, and the all acoustic String Stories with Joelle Leandre and India Cooke and also ensembles with Peter Kowald, John Butcher and Gino Robair.

Admission to this event is free.


Hans_Kupelwieser_EOe_31_Foto_Helmut_Lackinger.jpgMusic
Sunday, March 9 | 4:00 p.m.
Christie Finn, soprano
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Christie Finn (’07 Music) presents a program of contemporary works featuring:

  • Linda Dusman (professor of Music): Triptych of Gossips (with violinist Airi Yoshioka, associate professor of Music)
  • Georges Aperghis: Récitations pour voix seule

A two-time winner of an interpretation prize at the International Stockhausen Concerts and Courses (Kürten, Germany), American soprano Christie Finn is actively involved in the world of contemporary performance and new music theater. In recent seasons, Finn has performed as a soloist with the Asko | Schönberg Ensemble (Netherlands), VocaalLAB(Amsterdam, Netherlands), the Hezarfen Ensemble (Istanbul, Turkey), and several ensembles in New York City, including ekmeles, the S.E.M. EnsembleExperiments in Opera, and Tactus. Upcoming performance highlights for 2014 include Ligeti’s Aventures and Nouvelles Aventures (Esslingen, Stuttgart, & Saarbrücken), a reprise performance of the complete Récitations of Georges Aperghis (Ithaca, New York), and Stockhausen’s Stimmung as part of the Festival Mixtur (Barcelona).

Recent performance highlights include the complete Récitations of Georges Aperghis as part of the first annual Resonant Bodies Festival (New York City), Sofia Gubaidulina’s Homage à  T. S. Eliot at the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ (Amsterdam) with the Asko | Schönberg Ensemble, a concert of premieres in Chicago with her experimental music duo NOISE-BRIDGE, Luciano Berio’s sequenza iii for the opening of a new art exhibit at the Landesmuseum Niederösterreich (Austria), Unsuk Chin’s Akrostichon-Wortspiel with the György Ligeti Academy as part of the Muziekzomer Festival Gelderland  2012 (Netherlands), the U.S. premiere of Luigi Nono’s Quando Stanno Morendo (Soprano II) with ekmeles, and several experimental music theater productions with the Studio für Stimmkunst und Neues Musiktheater in Stuttgart (Germany).  Recent music theater productions outside of Stuttgart include Jason Cady’s comic book/sitcom opera Happiness is the Problem with Experiments in Opera in Brooklyn, Georges Aperghis’ Sextuor: L’origine des Espèces (New York premiere), and VocaalLAB’s 2011 production of MonteverdISH (cover).

Finn is a graduate of the Manhattan School of Music’s Contemporary Performance Program, where she studied with Lucy Shelton. Finn also holds a Master of Music in Voice from Southern Methodist University (Dallas, Texas), where she studied with Joan Heller, and a Bachelor of Arts in Music with a minor in Modern Languages & Linguistics from UMBC, where she was a Linehan Artist Scholar.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. Tickets will be available in February 2014.

Photo: Helmut Lackinger


freexVisual Arts
Sunday, March 9 | 4:00 p.m.
We’re All VideoFreex!
East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art (off campus event)

A discussion with Skip Blumberg, Videofreex member and artist; Parry Teasdale, Videofreex co-founder and editor, and Tom Colley, collections manager, Video Data Bank.

In the late 60s, the recording of image and sound with instantaneous playback signaled the dawn of a new media—video—that was more accessible and more discreet than film had ever been. With video cameras known as portapaks in hand, the co-founders of the Videofreex collective (1969-1978) were pioneers in the development of community television, founders of the country’s first pirate TV station, as well as mentors and instructors to countless individuals interested in making and sharing an open system of production. A selection of videos produced by the Freex and archived at Video Data Bank in Chicago features an interview with Fred Hampton of the Black Panthers, a discussion with organizer Abbey Hoffman, and excerpts from other early video recordings.

This discussion is one of several talks, films and performances in the series organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, Jump Over Timecurated by Joanna Raczynska (’98, Visual Arts) of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.  Jump Over Time looks at some creative uses of video documentation as an idiom and form used by media artists. When does the video documentation of an event shift from witness to evidence? If a performance is designed for the camera is the urgency, the live-ness, of the performance obliterated?  When the video maker’s intent is to re-present a specific historic period, action, or happening, can reenactments be considered documentation? Selected works as well as visiting artists and archivists will speak to the many ways archives—brimming with mediated experiences—that are critical to cultural determination, memory and practice.


Violeta Went to HeavenMLLI
Monday, March 10  | 7:15 p.m.
Violeta Went to Heaven
Administration Building Room 101

As part of the MLLI Spanish Film Series, the department presents Violeta Went to Heaven (Andrés Wood 2011 Chile), a subtitled Latin American film. As described in the New York Times:  “Depicting the unconventional life of the Chilean musician and folk artist Violeta Parra, ‘Violeta Went to Heaven’ unfolds as a poetic sine wave of celebration and defeat. By turns charming, selfish, passionate and dismissive, Parra (beautifully played by Francisca Gavilán) poured herself into her songs, emotionally resonant wails of romantic pain and social injustice.” (Jeanette Catsoulis, New York Times)


German filmMLLI
Tuesday, March 11 | 7:00 p.m.
3 Zimmer/Küche/Bad
Administration Building Room 101

As part of the MLLI German Film Series, the department presents 3 Zimmer/Küche/Bad in German with English subtitles. What is it like to live with friends in a Wohngemeinschaft (shared apartment) in today’s urban Germany? This film portrays the life of eight teens and twenty-somethings who are always on the move. They refashion their own relationships and reshape their physical surroundings and living conditions, falling in and out of love, moving in and out of apartments. Along the way some discover shocking facts about their parents, whose relationships are not what they seem. A comedic milieu-study of contemporary German youth with a cast of actors from some of the best German theater families.


BookPortraitSocial Sciences Forum, Humanities Forum
Wednesday, March 12 | 7:00 – 8:30 p.m.
“Curious Behavior: A Celebration of Undergraduate Research at UMBC”
Robert Provine, Neuroscientist, Professor of Psychology, UMBC
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The Fifth Annual Distinguished Lecture in Psychology is sponsored by the Department of Psychology. Sponsored by the Social Sciences Forum and co-sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

Robert Provine’s latest book, Curious Behavior: Yawning, Laughing, Hiccupping, and Beyond, has received rave reviews. It won the PROSE Award 2012 as the best book in biomedicine and neuroscience and was selected as a Library Journal Best Book of the Year. Professor Provine will reflect on his 39-year career at UMBC and discuss how undergraduate research can change the way we look at human behavior and solve ancient problems.

Robert R. Provine, a neuroscientist and professor of Psychology at UMBC, studies the development and evolution of the nervous system and behavior, including human social behavior. His widely cited book Laughter: A Scientific Investigation was selected as one of The 25 Books to Remember from 2000 by the New York Public Library, and his articles are reprinted in The Best American Science Writing 2006 and The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2006. His most recent book is Curious Behavior: Yawning, Laughing, Hiccupping, and Beyond (2012), an exploration of neglected human instincts.Provine’s research and writing are widely covered in the broadcast news, news magazines, and morning shows, including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Radio Lab, CBS 20/20, CBS Sunday Morning, Scientific American Frontiers, ABC World News Tonight, and Good Morning America, and print media, including The New York Times, Time magazine, Discover, Scientific American, Nature, New Scientist, and The Times (London). He advocates “small science” and “sidewalk neuroscience,” approaches to serious problems that require minimal resources and can be conducted by anyone. Provine is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association for Psychological Science.


Rue CasesMLLI
Wednesday, March 12 | 7:00 p.m.
Rue Cases-Nègres
Sherman Hall B Wing Room 006

As part of the MLLI French Film Series, the department presents Rue Cases-Nègres (Black Shack Alley). The introduction and post film discussion will be lead by Dr. Judith Schneider, an associate professor of French at UMBC. The 1983 classic by Martinican director Euzhan Palcy tells the story of a young black orphan growing up with his grandmother in 1930s Martinique.

The film has received several awards: Winner: Best First Film – Euzhan Palcy – 1983 French Academy of Cinema, Best Actress –Darling Legitimus 1983 Venice International Film Festival, Silver Lion for Best First Film – Euzhan Palcy – 1983 Venice International Film Festival.

“One of the most dazzlingly beautiful, exquisitely lyrical and profoundly moving films of
all time . . . Rue Cases-Nègres (Black Shack Alley)” (L. Johns, TheRoot.com)


think_create_engage_red1

Dresher Center for the Humanities CURRENTS
Monday, March 24 | 12:00 p.m.
Anna M. Shields: Set in Stone? Posthumous Accounts, Epitaphs and the Writing of Mid-Tang Literati Biographies
Teresa Foster: ‘Pleading the Belly’: Convict Transportation and Motherhood
Dresher Center Conference Room (216 Performing Arts and Humanities Building)

The Dresher Center’s CURRENTS: Humanities Work Now lunchtime series showcases exciting new faculty work in a dynamic and interdisciplinary setting. Designed to promote ongoing conversation and multi-disciplinary investigation, these works-in-progress meetings offer faculty and advanced graduate students an informal venue for presentation, conversation, and ongoing collaborative exchange.

Anna M. Shields: Set in Stone? Posthumous Accounts, Epitaphs, and the Writing of Mid-Tang Literati Biographies
I am in the early stages of a new project on constructions of Tang dynasty (617-907) literary culture that were written during the Five Dynasties (907-976) and Northern Song (976-1127) eras in China. In this project I will explore key works about Tang writers and literature from the tenth through early twelfth centuries—focusing on historical biographies, poetry anthologies, and anecdote collections. As the earliest, most influential portraits of Tang literary culture for later Chinese readers these texts represent the Tang as the ultimate “literary” dynasty, reading Tang literature and writers through an increasingly narrow lens that frequently excluded the social and political dimensions of Tang writing. I will present a case study of funerary texts for the mid-Tang literatus Han Yu (768-824) that were used by tenth- and eleventh-century historians to write Han’s biography, showing the ways that later writers selected and erased certain components of the texts to construct a “Han Yu” that suited their broader view of the mid-Tang era.

Teresa Foster: ‘Pleading the Belly’: Convict Transportation and Motherhood
Women adjudged guilty of a felony and condemned to death could avoid the hangman’s noose by “pleading the belly” in eighteenth-century Britain. The respite of precious months offered by pregnancy was sufficient to receive a conditional pardon for transportation to the American colonies. The desirability of convict transportation as an alternative punishment to public hanging may appear obvious. However, much less obvious is the maternal sacrifice required of postpartum women forced to abandon their newborns to an uncertain fate. Removed by prison or parish officials, the children of convict mothers became fictive orphans. I argue that an examination of familial relations within the system of convict transportation reveals a codified pattern of gendered dehumanization through an abrogation of natal ties.

Attendees are welcome to enjoy lunch beginning at 11:30 a.m.


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Humanities Forum
Tuesday, March 25 | 4:30 p.m.
“The Fraught Crossroads: Where Class, Race, Sex and Violence Converge across American History”
Lawrence Weschler, author
7th Floor, Albin O. Kuhn Library

Sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities. Co-sponsored by the Department of American Studies and the Orser Center for the Study of Place, Community, and Culture.

Using assemblage artist Edward Kienholz’s harrowing 1970 lynching tableau Five Car Stud as a point of departure, Lawrence Weschler explores the ways in which race has served as the radioactive core of American history, continually warping the potential for ordinary class-based politics and accounting for all manner of perverse American exceptionalisms (the subject of Weschler’s current work-in-progress).

Lawrence Weschler was for over twenty years (1981-2002) a staff writer at The New Yorker, where his work shuttled between political tragedies and cultural comedies. He is a two-time winner of the George Polk Award (for Cultural Reporting in 1988 and Magazine Reporting in 1992) and was also a recipient of Lannan Literary Award (1998).

His books of political reportage include The Passion of Poland (1984); A Miracle, A Universe: Settling Accounts with Torturers (1990); and Calamities of Exile: Three Nonfiction Novellas (1998). His “Passions and Wonders” series currently comprises Seeing is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees: A Life of Contemporary Artist Robert Irwin (1982); David Hockney’s Cameraworks (1984); Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder (1995); A Wanderer in the Perfect City: Selected Passion Pieces (1998) Boggs: A Comedy of Values  (1999); Robert Irwin: Getty Garden (2002); Vermeer in Bosnia (2004); and Everything that Rises: A Book of Convergences (February 2006). Mr. Wilson was shortlisted for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award; and Everything that Rises received the 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism.


Classics-Guest-Lecturer

Ancient Studies
Wednesday, March 26 | 12:00 Noon
“Warfare and Athletics in the Ancient Greek World”
Matthew Trundle, Classics and Ancient History, University of Auckland
215, Fine Arts Building

Dr. Matthew Trundle is Professor and Head of the Classics and Ancient History Department at the University of Auckland in Auckland, New Zealand. Author of numerous articles and book chapters on topics in Greek history, Prof. Trundle has written Greek Mercenaries: From the Late Archaic Period to Alexander (Routledge, 2004) and co-edited New Perspectives on Ancient Warfare (Leiden, 2010) and Beyond the Gates of Fire: New Perspectives on the Battle of Thermopylae (Bradford, 2013). He is currently completing the editing of Roman-era inscriptions from Isthmia for publication and working on an project that examines the roles of coined money in the transformation of the Greek world in the classical period.


rsaenz13

Social Sciences Forum
Thursday, March 27 | 4:30 p.m.
“Changing Demography, Eroding Democracy: Challenges to Latinos in the 21st Century”
Rogelio Sáenz, Dean of the College of Public Policy and Professor of Demography, University of Texas at San Antonio
7th floor, Albin O. Kuhn Library

Co-sponsored with the Latino/Hispanic Faculty Association, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and the Language, Literacy and Culture Doctoral Program.

Professor Sáenz will provide an overview of the growth of the Latino population in the 21st century and the backlash that has occurred in efforts to minimize the political representation of Latinos. He will also discuss the opportunities and challenges that are ahead for Latinos.

Rogelio Sáenz is Dean of the College of Public Policy and Peter Flawn Professor of Demography at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He is also a Carsey Policy Fellow at the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire. Sáenz received his Ph.D. in sociology from Iowa State University. He has written extensively in the areas of demography, Latina/os, race and ethnic relations, inequality, and immigration. Sáenz is co-editor of Latina/os in the United States: Changing the Face of América and co-author of Latino Issues: A Reference Handbook. He also writes regularly for the Population Reference Bureau on ongoing demographic trends including authoring the Population Reference Bureau’s Population Bulletin Updated titled Latinos in the United States 2010 Saenz is currently the Vice President of the Southwestern Social Science Association and is also Chair of the Council of the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR).


frank-wiens-5-3-091-360x450

Music
Thursday, March 27 | 8:00 p.m.
Franks Wiens, Piano
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Frank Wiens has concertized extensively throughout the United States and abroad, including highly praised recitals in New York and London. He has twice toured South Korea, and gave his recital debut on the European continent in Vienna in 1987. In 2006 Frank Wiens appeared as soloist with the “Orchestra Dinu Lipatti” in Romania, and gave recitals devoted to the music of Chopin at the Chopin Academy and at the Lazienki Palace on Water in Warsaw, Poland.

Mr. Wiens’ program will feature:

  • Variations on an Original Theme, Opus 21, No. 1, by Johannes Brahms
  • Fantasie in F# Minor, Opus 28 by Felix Mendelssohn
  • Nocturne in Db Major, Opus 68 by Gabriel Fauré
  • Mephisto Waltz No. 1 by Franz Liszt
  • Ten Preludes from Opus 32 by Sergei Rachmaninov

With an extensive concerto repertoire of thirty-five works, he has been a soloist with such orchestras as the Atlanta, Denver and Detroit Symphonies. A winner of major awards in prestigious competitions – North American Young Artists Competition, Southwest Pianists Foundation Competition, Three Rivers Piano Competition – he has given annual concert tours across the U.S. since 1974.

His performances have been broadcast on National Public Radio and Public Television, and he has been a touring artist with the Iowa Arts Council and the California Arts Council. His compact disc recording “Rachmaninov,” which includes that composer’s Third Piano Concerto with the Slovakia National Orchestra, has been described by one reviewer as “dazzling, yet rich in solid detail…brilliant clarity and absolute conviction…truly suave and elegant playing.”

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance with a credit card, purchase online through MissionTix.


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Theatre
Thursday, March 27 – Sunday, March 30
Gum
Black Box Theatre

The Department of Theatre presents the production, Gum by Karen Hartman, under the direction of Eve Muson, assistant professor of Theatre.

In a futuristic dystopia where girls may not venture outside their garden walls, two sisters seek escape in music and poetry–and in black-market chewing gum, which is believed to undermine the virtue of traditional girls.  When the older sister rebels against an arranged marriage, her family takes steps to curtail her freedom forever.  With mounting terror, Gum depicts the consequences of sexual awakening in a fiercely repressive culture where Juicy Fruit is contraband and every desire has its price.

This production is for mature audiences.

Performances
Thursday, March 27 | 8:00 p.m.
Friday, March 28 | 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 29 | 2:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 29 | 8:00 p.m. (Followed by a discussion with playwright, Karen Hartman)
Sunday, March 30 | 2:00 p.m. (Followed by a panel discussion)

The Sunday, March 30 panel following this performance, will focus on modesty, and the social and religious practices of veiling the body. Speakers include Anne Brodsky, Associate Dean in the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, UMBC; Kate Drabinski, Lecturer of Gender and Women Studies, UMBC; Vicki Goutzoulis ’15; Deanna Zare ’14; Benjamin Nabinger ’16; and Amalia Marks ’13. Moderated by Sameera Mukhtar ’15.

$15 general admission, $10 students and seniors. Purchase no-fee tickets at Missiontix.com.

Matinee performances are free for UMBC students with a UMBC ID. Students may pick up their tickets from the Theatre Department Office Monday – Thursday, 10 a.m. until 4 p.m, or at the box office beginning at 1 p.m. on the day of the matinee. Limit one ticket per student.


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Music
Friday, March 28 | 7:30 p.m.
Jazz Festival: Faculty Jazz Ensemble
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the Faculty Jazz Ensemble with, Harry Appelman (piano), Tom Baldwin (bass), Matt Belzer (saxophones), Tom Lagana (guitar), Mike Noonan (vibraphone), Scott Tiemann (drums) and Tom Williams (trumpet).

This concert is the first in the three-performance Jazz Festival, which continues on Saturday, March 29 with the Maryland All-State Jazz Band and concludes on Friday, April 4 with the UMBC Jazz Ensemble with the Larry Willis Trio.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. Tickets will be available at the door, cash only.

Sunday, March 29 | 7:30 p.m.
Jazz Festival: Maryland All-State Jazz Band
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the Maryland All-State Jazz Band as the second concert in the three-performance Jazz Festival, which begins on Friday, March 28 with the Faculty Jazz Ensemble and concludes on Friday, April 4 with the UMBC Jazz Ensemble with the Larry Willis Trio.

Admission to be announced.


michael-benson-space-photography-planetfall-jupiter-moon-io-erupting-into-space

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, April 1 | 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
“The Aesthetics of Astronomy: A Subjective Look at Cosmographical Depictions through Time”
Michael Benson, Writer, photographer and artist
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

Sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities. Co-sponsored by the Center for Innovation, Research and Creativity in the Arts, and the Department of History.

Writer, photographer and artist Michael Benson presents a retrospective look at the visual legacy of space exploration, covering fifty years of space travel, from the American Mariner probe fly-by of Venus in December 1962 to the latest images from the Mars Rover. His images are not so much otherworldly as abstract, modernist creations of lush imagination.

Benson works at the intersection of art and science. A photographer, writer, filmmaker, book-maker, and exhibitions producer, in the last decade he has staged a series of increasingly large-scale shows of planetary landscape photography internationally. Benson takes raw data from NASA and European Space Agency archives and processes it, creating large-format landscapes. He edits, composites, then frequently mosaics, and then finally optimizes these images, producing seamless digital C prints of landscapes beyond direct human experience. He is also an award-winning filmmaker, with work that straddles the boundary between fiction and documentary practice.

Thanks to the photographic output of a small squadron of interplanetary spacecraft, we have awakened to the beauty and splendor of the solar system. Since the publication of Benson’s highly acclaimed Beyond: Visions of the Interplanetary Probes, new, more powerful cameras in probes with greatly improved maneuverability have traversed the wheeling satellites of Jupiter; roamed the boulder-strewn red deserts of Mars; studied Saturn’s immaculate rings; and shown us our own ravishing Earth, a blue-white orb with a disturbingly thin atmosphere, as it plunges deeper into ecological crisis. These new images are the subject of Benson’s Planetfall, a truly revelatory book that uses its large page size to reproduce the greatest achievements in contemporary planetary photography as never before.

His book Far Out: A Space-Time Chronicle was heralded in the New York Times as an extraordinary achievement: “If you don’t have your own Hubble Space Telescope, this book is the next best thing.” OfPlanetfallThe New York Times has written, “All retrospectives, art and otherwise, should shock us awake the way this one does…Planetfall is a book of science through and through, but it also deepens our sense of the miracle and the mystery of the universe, of our eye-blink lives.”

Admission is free.


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Social Sciences Forum
Wednesday, April 2 | 4:00 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery, 7th Floor

The annual Low Lecture is co-sponsored with the Department of History.

From the late nineteenth century through World War II, popular culture represented the American South by such southern icons as the mammy, the belle, the chivalrous planter, and white-columned mansions. In Dreaming of Dixie (2011), Professor Cox shows that the chief purveyors of nostalgia for the Old South played to consumers’ anxiety about modernity by marketing the South as a region still dedicated to America’s pastoral traditions. Professor Cox will also examine more recent representations of the South on television from The Andy Griffith Show to reality TV.

Karen L. Cox is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and the founding director of the graduate public history program. Dr. Cox received her B.A. and M.A. in history from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and her Ph.D. in 1997 from the University of Southern Mississippi. She is the author of two books and numerous essays and articles on the subject of southern history and culture. Her first book, Dixie’s Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture, won the 2004 Julia Cherry Spruill Prize from the Southern Association for Women Historians for the Best Book in Southern Women’s History. Her second book, published by UNC Press in 2011, is Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture. She is the editor of Destination Dixie: Tourism and Southern History (University Press of Florida, forthcoming 2012), which won the 2013 Allen G. Noble Award for the best edited collection in North American material culture from the Pioneer America Society. She is also at work on a third monograph entitled Where the Old South Still Lives: Murder, Race, and the Southern Gothic, set in 1930s Natchez, Mississippi.

Dr. Cox has published op-eds in The New York Times and has appeared on C-Span, as well as several radio broadcasts including Canadian Public Radio. She maintains a blog, Pop South: Reflections on the South in Popular Culture.

Admission is free.


 

mfa_card-1Visual Arts
Thursday, April 3 – Friday, April 25
MFA Thesis Exhibition
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture presents the annual MFA Thesis Exhibition featuring works by graduates of UMBC’s MFA programs in Visual Arts. The work selected represents the culmination of each student’s unique experience in UMBC’s dynamic and demanding MFA program.

Exhibition includes work by Michael Farley, Charlotte KenistonLexie MountainShana Palmer, Carrie Rennolds and Dominique Zeltzman.

Opening Reception Thursday April 3 | 5 – 7 pm
5:15pm “Fred Worden Cuts A Couch In Half With A Chainsaw” (Performance by Lexie Mountain)

Admission to this exhibition is free and open to the public. The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm, and is located in the Fine Arts Building. For more information, call 410-455-3188.


Joe Burgstaller

Joe Burgstaller

Music
Thursday, April 3 | 8:00 p.m.
UMBC Brass Bash
Fine Arts Recital Hall

UMBC Music faculty and students come together for a night of exciting brass music.

Performers will include UMBC Faculty members and affiliate artists Wayne Cameron (trumpet), Kristin Jurkscheit (french horn), Patrick Crossland (trombone), Brian Kaufman (tuba), and Harry Appelman (piano), as well as guest artists Joe Burgstaller (trumpet) and Alastair Edmonstone (piano).

“No one can deny the virtuosity and flamboyant musicianship of Mr. Burgstaller. His singing tone, lightning technique, and extroverted phrasing place him in a different league.”

The International Trumpet Guild Journal

Joe Burgstaller has thrilled audiences throughout the world with his dazzling virtuosity, captivating sensitivity and engaging personality.  He tours worldwide as a soloist (30 appearances this season in Shanghai, Hong Kong, Singapore, Seoul, Taipei, Bangkok, Hamburg, Bologna, US Virgin Islands and 13 U.S. States) as well as a clinician with his groundbreaking masterclasses for all instruments called “Change Your Mind, Change Your Playing®”.  He is Distinguished Faculty at The Peabody Institute (The Johns Hopkins University) in Baltimore, MD, where he teaches trumpet and chamber music. Formerly with Canadian Brass (8 yrs.) and the avant-garde Meridian Arts Ensemble (6 yrs.), he was also one of the all-time most popular soloists at Columbia Artists’ Community Concerts, performing 60 solo concerts every year.  His extensive discography includes solo CDs (License to Thrill and The Virtuoso Trumpet) and three Top-10 Billboard hits.  Joe Burgstaller is a Yamaha Performing Artist.

Joe and his newest solo CD “License To Thrill” were recently the subject of an hour-long segment of The INNERView (100 million viewers) on Korea’s Arirang Television, as well as an hour-long feature on Sirius-XM Classical Radio. “License To Thrill” features the music of Vivaldi-Bach, Sting, Jennifer Higdon, Gershwin, Chick Corea and a new commission by Su Lian Tan entitled “Ming”. His last two CDs with his Classical/Jazz-Hybrid crossover group BM4 (Bach’s Secret Files and Mozart’s Blue Dreams) were Top-50 on the JazzRadio charts and the Roots Radio Report (under Paul Simon but right above the Beastie Boys).

He has performed in front of more than 40 orchestras (Philadelphia, Minnesota, Detroit, Houston, Baltimore, New Jersey, Virginia, et.al) as a member of Canadian Brass and as a soloist, in more than 50 Music Festivals, and has performed and taught at over 80 universities, conservatories and colleges.  Every summer he teaches at the Music Academy of the West in Santa Barbara, CA.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with UMBC ID.


Punch

MLLI
Friday, April 4 | 2:30 p.m.
Punch
Administration Building 101 (Lecture Hall 3)

As part of the MLLI Film Series, the Korean area of MLLI presentsPunch (Original Title – Wan-deuk-i). The film is about a bond between a troubled high school student, Wand-deuk, and one of his school teachers who also has rebellious characteristics. It also deals with a social issue related to multicultural families in South Korea. This film is recommended to the students in Korean language courses and will be presented by Dr. Kyung-Eun Yoon, a lecturer in MLLI.


Larry Willis

Larry Willis

Music
Friday, April 4 | 7:30 p.m.
Jazz Festival: UMBC Jazz Ensemble with the Larry Willis Trio
Fine Arts Recital Hall

A performance featuring the UMBC Jazz Ensemble and the Larry Willis Trio: Larry Willis (piano), Steve Novocel (bass), Billy Williams (drums).

Pianist Larry Willis has had an important and distinguished 40-year career in jazz. Since making his recording debut on Jackie McLean’s landmark 1965 album “Right Now!,” the New York-born Willis has played everything from free jazz to fusion to rock while performing as a valued sideman with such jazz titans as Dizzy Gillespie, Lee Morgan, Cannonball Adderley, Art Blakey and Woody Shaw.

Larry’s extraordinary versatility as a pianist ranges from rock and pop. He spent 7 years as keyboardist for Blood, Sweat and Tears to African, Brazilian and Afro- Cuban music. He’s one of the only non-Hispanic players who ever impressed Mario Bauza as a Latin pianist.

Another facet of Larry’s genius is his composing and arranging for orchestras and big bands. He’s always had a very special gift for arranging strings, strings that form a gorgeous, open framework for jazz improvisation. His first major string works were symphonic arrangements for a Brooklyn Symphony concert with the Fort Apache Band in 1994. Since then he’s done gem-like string quartet and quintet arrangements for three Mapleshade jazz CDs: John Hicks “Trio Plus Strings,” Sunny Sumter’s “Sunny,” and Monica Worth’s “Never Let Me Go.” Recently, he wrote larger scale arrangements for albums by Roy Hargrove, Vanessa Rubin and Joe Ford, among others. Larry composed an orchestral suite in four movements for the Florida Southern College Symphony Orchestra and then performed it in concert. He was also featured soloist with an Italian chamber orchestra, performing his own compositions.

Larry Willis is a three-time Grammy nominee with Fort Apache as well as pianist on two of their New York Jazz Critics Award-winning CDs. He’s was also on Roy Hargrove’s Grammy-winning “Crisol Band” CD and toured for three years with Roy. Currently, he is touring actively with his own Trio and Quintet as well as with Fort Apache from time to time.

 Larry Willis released in 2007 his tribute to his mentor Jackie Mclean “Blue Fable,” on the HighNote label. With his high school buddy Eddie Gomez on bass, his quintet plays a set of post-bop standards and some original compositions, including an exuberant version of Thelonious Monk’s “Rhythm-A-Ning,” an introspective performance of Miles Davis’s “Nardis,” Jackie McLeans’s “Blue Fable,” (title cut) and his own “Prayer for New Orleans.” His most recent release is “The Offering.”

Admission is free, with donations accepted at the door.


jjackson Social Sciences Forum
Monday, April 7 | 4:00 p.m.
“Black Gods and Red Devils: Race, Religion and the Re-Imagining of Africana Subjectivity”
John L. Jackson,  Africana Studies and Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
7th Floor, Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery

Co-sponsored with the Africana Studies Research Colloquium, Department of Africana Studies.

Professor Jackson will discuss the African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem, a group of African Americans that emigrated from the United States to Israel in the 1960s. His talk will explain how this group understands their links to the ancient Hebrews and how they have spent the last 45 years in Israel creating a transnational spiritual community, with members in Africa, Europe and the Americas, that attempts to radically re-imagine what “race” and “religion” mean in the 21st century.

John L. Jackson, Jr., is the Richard Perry University Professor of Communication, Africana Studies, and Anthropology in the Standing Faculty of the Annenberg School for Communication and the Standing Faculty of the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. Before joining Penn, Jackson taught in the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and spent three years as a Junior Fellow at the Harvard University Society of Fellows in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Jackson received his B.A. in Communications (Radio, TV, Film) from Howard University in Washington, D.C., and his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University in New York City. As a filmmaker, Jackson has produced a feature-length fiction film, documentaries, and film-shorts that have screened at film festivals internationally.

His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation, Harvard University’s Milton Fund, and the Lilly Endowment (during a year at the National Humanities Center in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina). He has published several books, Harlemworld: Doing Race and Class in Contemporary Black America (University of Chicago Press, 2001), Real Black: Adventures in Racial Sincerity (University of Chicago Press, 2005), and Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness (Basic, 2008), released in paperback in 2010. Jackson has just released Thin Description: Ethnography and the African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem (Harvard University Press, 2013) and is completing another book (co-authored by Cora Daniels), Impolite Conversations: On Race, Politics, Sex, Money, and Religion (Atria [Simon and Schuster]) that is slated for release in 2014. His most recent film, co-directed with Deborah Thomas, is Bad Friday: Rastafari After Coral Gardens (Third World Newsreel, 2012).

Admission is free.


Clandestine ChildhoodMLLI
Monday, April 7 | 7:15 p.m.
Clandestine Childhood
Administration Building Room 101

As part of the MLLI Spanish Film Series, the department presents Clandestine Childhood (Benjamín Ávila 2011 Argentina). The film’s 12 year-old protagonist, semiautobiographical of director Benjamín Ávila as a child, and his family return from exile to Argentina in 1979 with false identities so that his political activist parents may continue their fight against the Military Junta. The feature richly blends live-action and graphic novel-style animation. The film will be shown with English subtitles.


sam2

Philosophy, Humanities Forum
Wednesday, April 9 | 4:00 – 5:30 p.m.
“Dignity and Disability”
Samuel Kerstein, Philosophy, University of Maryland, College Park
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The annual Barker Lecture is sponsored by the Department of Philosophy and co-sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

Samuel Kerstein (Ph.D., Columbia University) is professor of Philosophy at the University of Maryland, College Park. His research focuses on Kants moral philosophy, normative ethics, and bioethics. Several of his current projects stem from his book How to Treat Persons (Oxford, 2013). For example, he is developing a Kantian conception of the dignity of persons and exploring its implications for issues in bioethics, including the fair distribution of scarce, life-saving resources and moral constraints on medical research.

When we allocate scarce life-saving resources such as organs for transplant, we determine who will live and who will die. This lecture aims to help determine just what ethical constraints should guide the allocation of resources. Some ethicists and policy makers claim that we should give treatment to someone who would return to full health after treatment rather than another who would be disabled. Professor Kerstein sets out reasons for rejecting this claim and considers whether it is consistent with a principle of respect for the dignity of persons.

Admission is free.


 

images-1Visual Arts
Thursday, April 10 | 7:00 p.m.
Antoni Muntadas, Visiting Artist Lecture
Lecture Hall 1

UMBC’s Department of Visual Arts and the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture welcome the internationally acclaimed multidisciplinary installation artist Antoni Muntadas, whose work has been exhibited in major art institutions throughout the world. Addressing social, political, and communications issues, such as the relationship between public and private space within social frameworks, his work also investigates channels of information and the ways they may be used to censor or promulgate ideas.

Organized by Visiting Curator Niels Van Tomme, Muntadas’ lecture will initiate a new exhibition project entitled Muntadas: Activating Artifacts. Conceived exclusively for the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture at UMBC, Muntadas: Activating Artifacts is scheduled to be presented in the fall of 2015.

Antoni Muntadas (born in 1942 in Barcelona) is a pioneer in the field of conceptual and media art. Since 1971, he has lived and worked in New York City. He was a Research Fellow at the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT from 1977 to 1984, and is currently Professor of the Practice at the MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology and Visiting Professor at the IUAV in Venice, Italy. He works in a variety of media, including photography, video, publications, the Internet, and multi-media installations. Muntadas’ work has been exhibited in numerous museums, including the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the Musée Contemporain de Montreal, the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (Madrid), the Museo de Arte Moderno (Buenos Aires), and the Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona. His work has also been shown in documenta VI and X (Kassel, Germany) (1977, 1997), the Whitney Biennial of American Art (1991), the 51st Venice Biennial (2005), and biennials in São Paulo, Lyon, Taipei, Kwangju, and Havana.


Zane Forshee

Music
Thursday, April 10 | 8:00 p.m.
Zane Forshee, classical guitar
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Fingerstyle Guitar Magazine describes Zane Forshee as “one of his generation’s finest guitarists.” Active both as a soloist and in chamber ensembles, recent concert engagements have taken him across North America, Europe, and Asia, where his live performances have been noted for possessing “a beautiful ever-flow that held the audience captivated” (Retriever Weekly).

Zane has been featured at the Palacete de Amezúa (Madrid), the Joseph Joachim Konzertsaal (Berlin), the Library of Congress (Washington, D.C.), the New York City Classical Guitar Society, and the Chimei Museum (Taiwan). He has given collaborative performances with Opus 1 Contemporary Dance Company, in addition to solo and chamber recitals for the Philadelphia Classical Guitar Society, the Omaha Guitar Guild, and the Endless Mountain Music Festival.

His debut recording Initial has been praised for its “Superb musical and technical skill” (Minor7th.com). Classical Guitar Magazine states “Forshee immediately establishes his credentials as an excellent player, with clarity, precision and an abundance of fine technique.”

Winner of numerous top prizes, including the first prize in the National Guitar Workshop International Solo Guitar Competition and the top prize in the Montpelier Artist Recital Competition, Forshee was recently awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to Spain in support of his current recording project of contemporary Spanish works for solo guitar. In addition to these awards, he has been the recipient of two Peabody Institute Career Development Grants.

Zane holds a Doctor of Musical Arts Degree, Master of Music Degree, and Graduate Performance Diploma from the Peabody Conservatory of Music of the Johns Hopkins University. Presently, Zane is the chair of the Guitar and Harp department of the Peabody Institute-Preparatory Division. In addition to his duties at Peabody, he serves on the faculty of the UMBC and the Performing Arts Institute Summer Music Festival in Pennsylvania. Recently he served as the visiting guitar faculty for the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.

Zane Forshee is a D’Addario Artist and plays on D’Addario strings.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. Tickets will be available at the door, cash or check only.


wNtNzw3MTRhn3QCM4MMX1mxnM5rvj98Fu8-5Y7Dg_3wDance
Friday – Saturday, April 11 – 12 | 8:00 p.m.
Senior Dance Concert
Studio 317, Fine Arts Building

The Department of Dance presents the Senior Dance Concert featuring choreography from Department of Dance seniors.

$12 general admission $7 students and seniors. For information and reservations, call the Dance Box Office at 410-455-6240; order tickets online through MissionTix.

 


Jem-CohenVisual Arts
Monday, April 14 | 7:00 p.m.
Gravity Hill Newsreels: Occupy Wall Street
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture presents filmmaker Jem Cohen who will discuss  12 short observations about Occupy Wall Street (2011/2012), New York City.

“In regards to Occupy Wall Street, when friends asked me where the newsreels were, I decided to plunge in and make some myself. We knew there’d eventually be many documentaries made about the phenomenon and that there were already short advocacy pieces in support of the movement (as well as YouTube slams against it). My own interest lay elsewhere: in a kind of reporting based on direct observation that expresses solidarity without propaganda, while leaving room for experimentation and lyricism.” – Jem Cohen

Jem Alan Cohen (born 1962) is an award-winning New York City-based filmmaker known for his observational portraits of urban landscapes, blending of media formats (16mm, Super 8, video) and collaborations with music artists. Cohen was born in Kabul, Afghanistan. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 1984, with a concentration on painting and photography.

Gravity Hill Newsreels: Occupy Wall Street is the fifth installment of the six-part lecture series Jump Over Time: Uses of Documentation Video. Organized by Joanna Raczynska, Visiting Curator at the CADVC and Assistant Head of Film Programs at the National Gallery of Art, the series explores a wide range of creative uses of video documentation as an idiom and form used by media artists. When does the video documentation of an event shift from witness to evidence? If a performance is designed for the camera is the urgency, the live-ness, of the performance obliterated?  When the video maker’s intent is to re-present a specific historic period, action, or happening, can reenactments be considered documentation? Selected works as well as visiting artists and archivists will speak to the many ways archives—brimming with mediated experiences—are critical to cultural determination, memory, and practice.

Admission is free.


bol07Humanities Forum, Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery
Wednesday, April 16 | 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
“Truth, Lies & the Construction of Reality: A Conversation about Book of Lies
Corazon del Sol, Curator
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities. Co-sponsored by the Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery.

In conjunction with the display of Book of Lies at the Library Gallery (more here), Los Angeles-based artist and curator Corazon del Sol will discuss the exhibition, which was conceived of—but ultimately left unfinished—by her mother, conceptual artist Eugenia P. Butler. Del Sol will examine the lie as a human strategy for coping with life, and how artists use the lie to explore our relationship with the truth.

Butler’s Book of Lies project began in 1991 and examined how other artists use “the lie to explore our relationship with the truth.” Known for her collaborations and interactions with other artists, Butler held three artist dinners where she asked her guests to consider the questions, “What is the lie with which I am most complicit?” and “What is the truth that most feeds my life?”

Conceived as a global conversation about truth and lies held through the medium of works of art and poetry, Book of Lies is a book that is not a book, a work of art made of other works of art using the lie to explore our relationship with truth. Book of Lies examines the lie as a human strategy using examples drawn from personal experiences including childhood, love, and war.

The exhibition Book of Lies is curated by Corazon del Sol and circulated by Curatorial Assistance Traveling Exhibitions, Pasadena, California.

Admission is free.

Image: Tom Marioni, Pi Is a Lie, 2005.


English, Theatre
Wednesday, April 23 | 3:45 p.m.
Revel in Variety: A Performance Featuring Shakespeare Sonnets Recited in More Than 30 Languages
310 University Center

Presented by the Dresher Center for the Humanities in collaboration with UMBC’s Departments of Theatre and English, and the Office of Undergraduate Education.

In celebration of Shakespeare’s birthday, Revel in Variety features performances by UMBC’s faculty, staff and students reciting Shakespeare sonnets in more than 30 languages.

Birthday cake will be served.


symphony-24Music
Sunday, April 27 | 7:30 p.m.
UMBC Symphony Orchestra
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The UMBC Symphony Orchestra performs under the direction of E. Michael Richards.

The program will feature:
· Weber’s Clarinet Concerto in F minor, featuring clarinetist Terri Baumann, winner of the 2013-14 UMBC Symphony Concerto Competition
· Bizet’s Suites 1 and 2 from L’Arlesienne
· Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6, “Pathetique”

Admission to this performance is free.


 

MAP_lostFairfieldInterdisciplinary
Monday, April 28 | 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
CIRCA Catalyst
With presenters Steve Bradley and Nicole King
Dresher Center Conference Room (216 Performing Arts and Humanities Building)

CIRCA Catalyst is an ongoing series promoting conversations around transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that fuses the performing and visual arts with other fields of inquiry and scholarship. A catered lunch, with vegetarian options, will be provided by CIRCA (the Center for Innovation, Research and Creativity in the Arts).

Catalyst Program:
UMBC associate professor Steve Bradley of Visual Arts and assistant professor Nicole King of American Studies will present their collaborative research Mapping Baybrook, an interdisciplinary exploration of place that uses digital mapping to illustrate research on the history and culture of an industrial community in Baltimore, Maryland referred to as Baybrook—a merging of the names of two neighborhoods, Brooklyn and Curtis Bay. The story of Greater Baybrook reflects the tenacity of a community striving for sustainability in the boom and bust of U. S. industrial development.

Steve Bradley is an inter-media and interdisciplinary artist whose focus is the mapping of place using sound, image, physical artifacts or debris that have been discarded or perhaps lost in the landscape. Then, using Google Map open source tools he archives, digitizes and juxtaposes these various elements with one another, striving to create micro-narratives that “tell” spatial-based stories for us to contemplate; for us to hear deeply, and to see our relationship to our time and space, and to one another.

He has received solo commissions and fellowships from organizations such as the National Endowment for the Arts, Inter-Society for the Electronic Arts (ISEA), Bienal de Arte Contemporaneo de Sevilla, Baltimore Rotterdam Sister City Committee, University of Oldenburg, Germany, Scientific Oceanographic facilities on the North Sea, and Hull Time-Based Arts, UK. His sound performances, media installations, and site-specific art works have been exhibited and presented both nationally and internationally.

Professor Bradley holds degrees in drawing and painting from the University of South Florida (B.F.A.), and in painting and electronic media from Florida State University (M.F.A.).

Nicole King joined the faculty of the Department of American Studies at UMBC as an assistant professor in 2008, the same year she earned her Ph.D in American Studies from the University of Maryland, College Park. She also has a M.A. in Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.

King’s research focuses on the tensions of preservation and development in historic places from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. She has published a book, Sombreros and Motorcycles in a Newer South: The Politics of Aesthetics in South Carolina’s Tourism Industry (University Press of Mississippi, 2012), on the rise of the tourism industry in South Carolina during the period of desegregation. Her work has also been published in edited collections and journals, including an article on her research on post-industrialization in Baltimore neighborhoods in the Journal of Urban History special edition “The Place of the City: Collaborative Learning, Urban History, and Transformations in Higher Education” (forthcoming May 2014).

Since 2009, King has been working on cultural documentation research and public humanities programming in the Brooklyn-Curtis Bay neighborhoods in the southern corner of Baltimore City. In collaboration with Visual Arts Professor Steve Bradley and the Imaging Research Center (IRC), King has developed the digital mapping project Mapping Baybrook.


Garcia Marquez

MLLI
Wednesday, April 30 | 12:00 p.m.
Remembering Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Sherman Hall Room 219 

On April 17, 2014, the Colombian and Latin American writer, Gabriel García Márquez died. Winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982, García Márquez is renowned as one of the greatest world writers of the modern period, as an active supporter of progressive causes and as a generous human being.

You are invited to bring a favorite magically realistic paragraph (in English or Spanish) and/or a remembrance of your encounter with the writer’s life and work to share with others.

The event takes place Wednesday, April 30 at noon in Sherman 219. It is sponsored by the departments of MLLI, Language, Literacy and Culture, and the Dresher Center for the Humanities.


dusman03-s

Humanities Forum, Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery
Thursday, May 1 | 4:00 – 5:30 p.m.
“Interiors: Identity in Music”
Linda Dusman, Music
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The annual Lipitz Lecture is sponsored by the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

During her Liptiz Professorship, Linda Dusman’s research explored identity issues in her own music and the music of Eleanor Hovda, a 20th-century American composer recently added to Dusman’s I Resound Press archive. The lecture will present her compositional process in the creation of two works, Lake, Thunder and Interiors, as well as general reflections on the exploration of identity in music by feminist composers.

Linda Dusman’s compositions and sonic art explore the richness of contemporary life, from the personal to the political. Her work has been awarded by the State of Maryland in 2004, 2006, and 2011 (in both the Music: Composition and the Visual Arts: Media categories), the International Alliance for Women in Music, Meet the Composer, the Swiss Women’s Music Forum, the American Composers Forum, the International Electroacoustic Music Festival of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and the Ucross Foundation, among others. In 2009 she was honored as a Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation Fellow for a residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. She was invited to serve as composer in residence at the New England Conservatory’s Summer Institute for Contemporary Piano in 2003. In the fall of 2006 Dr. Dusman was a Visiting Professor at the Conservatorio di musica “G. Nicolini” in Piacenza, Italy, and while there also lectured at the Conservatorio di musica “G. Verdi” in Milano.

As a frequent contributor to the literature on contemporary music and performance, Dr. Dusman’s articles have appeared in the journals LinkPerspectives of New Music, and Interface, as well as a number of anthologies. She was a founding editor of the journal Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture, and is as an associate editor for Perspectives of New Music. She is founding editor of I Resound Press, a digital press/archive for music by women composers. Former holder of the Jeppeson Chair in Music at Clark University, she is currently Professor of Music at UMBC, where she served as department chair from 2000 to 2008.

artscalblog_360px_72dpiTheatre
Thursday, May 1 – Sunday, May 4
Criminals in Love
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

BUY TICKETS

The Department of Theatre presents the comedy, Criminals in Love by George F. Walker, under the direction of Colette Searls, associate professor of Theatre.

An edgy modern award-winning comedy about two lust-filled teenagers in love, Gail and Junior, who are desperately trying to avoid going in the family business—crime! But money is tight, jobs are scarce, and Junior’s dad, an inept crook serving time for—well, stupidity, blackmails him into the family business. The harder the young couple strives to resist the criminal path, the weirder things get— Gail’s best friend try’s prostitution as an experimental line of work, a middle-aged homeless sage-of-odd-sorts attaches himself to Junior and worst of all Junior’s mysterious ‘former earth-mother gone to seed’ Aunt, lures the whole group into a vortex of ever stranger and more bazaar criminal schemes.

Written by Canada’s most acclaimed playwright, George Walker, Criminals in Love is lighthearted in its absurdity, yet sweetly tragic at heart. Junior and Gail have the most modest request of life: to be together and stay out of trouble— and isn’t that a simply ridiculous romantic notion in a world of family crime?

Suggested for ages 16+

Performances
Thursday, May 1 | 8:00 p.m. (Followed by an opening night reception.)
Friday, May 2 | 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, May 3 | 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, May 4 | 2:00 p.m.

$15 general admission, $10 students and seniors. Purchase no-fee tickets at Missiontix.com.

Matinee performances are free for UMBC students with a UMBC ID. Students may pick up their tickets from the Theatre Department Office Monday – Thursday, 10 a.m. until 4 p.m, or at the box office beginning at 1 p.m. on the day of the matinee. Limit one ticket per student.


pic23

Dance
Friday, May 2 | 8:00 p.m.
First Works
Studio 317, Fine Arts Building

UMBC Dance students present choreographic work for the first time in this First Works dance concert.

Admission to First Works is free.


 

music01-sMusic
Friday, May 2 | 8:00 p.m.
UMBC Collegium Musicum
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the Collegium Musicum under the direction of Joseph C. Morin. The Collegium Musicum is a performance ensemble dedicated to exploring and performing vocal and instrumental music from the European Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods, sampling musical repertoires created between 800 and 1750.

Admission is free.


ensemble_vocalartsMusic
Saturday, May 3 | 3:00 p.m.
Opera Workshop
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the Opera Workshop under the direction of Joseph Regan. The Opera Workshop is a course designed for 8 – 15 advanced vocalists, and offers students the opportunity to study stage acting, movement and character development within the sphere of musical performance.

Admission is free.


think_create_engage_red1Music
Saturday, May 3 | 7:00 p.m.
Jubilee Singers
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the Jubilee Singers (followed immediately by the UMBC Gospel Choir) under the direction of Janice Jackson.

Admission is free.


jazzensemble02-sMusic
Sunday, May 4 | 3:00 p.m.
UMBC Jazz In Concert
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents UMBC Jazz in Concert. A performance featuring all of the UMBC Jazz groups under the direction of  Matt Belzer and Tom Lagana, this concert includes the music of Mingus, Sun Ra, Schneider, Fischer and more. Join us for the final jazz ensemble concert in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

Admission is free, suggested donation $15.


Left to right: Gita Ladd, John Novacek and Airi Yoshioka

Left to right: Gita Ladd, John Novacek and Airi Yoshioka

Music
Sunday, May 4 | 8:00 p.m.
Yoshioka/Ladd/Novacek
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Cellist Gita Ladd and pianist John Novacek join forces for two epics of the cello/piano repertoire. Beethoven’s A major Sonata, a work of both tenderness and heroism, is the first genuine masterpiece of the genre. Rachmaninov’s G minor Sonata is a titanic work, music of searing romanticism and transcendental virtuosity. For the concert’s second half, the duo is joined by violinist Airi Yoshioka in a performance of Schubert’s stirring, sunny, and sublime Piano Trio in B-flat major, a pinnacle of the chamber music repertory.

The program features:

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Sonata No. 3 in A major for piano and cello, Op. 69
• Allegro ma non tanto
• Scherzo: Allegro molto
• Adagio cantabile—Allegro vivace

Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
Sonata in G minor for cello and piano, Op. 19
• Lento—Allegro moderato
• Allegro scherzando
• Andante
• Allegro mosso

Franz Schubert (1797-1828)
Trio No. 1 in B-flat major for piano, violin, and cello, D. 898 (Op. 99)
• Allegro moderato
• Andante un poco mosso
• Scherzo: Allegro
• Rondo: Allegro vivace

Pianist John Novacek regularly tours North and South America, Europe and Asia as solo recitalist, chamber musician and concerto soloist. He has performed in Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall, Alice Tully Hall, the Kennedy Center, the Hollywood Bowl, Paris’s Theatre des Champs-Elysées, London’s Wigmore Hall and Barbican Centre, as well as all the major concert halls of Japan. He is a frequent guest artist at festivals, having appeared at Mostly Mozart, Aspen, SummerFest La Jolla, Cape Cod, Caramoor, Colorado College, Mimir, San Luis Obispo Mozaic, Ravinia, Seattle, Wolf Trap, Scotia, Ottawa Chamberfest and Festival of the Sound (Canada), BBC Proms (England), Braunschweig (Germany), Lucerne, Menuhin Gstaad and Verbier (Switzerland), Majorca (Spain) and Stavanger (Norway). Often heard on radio, John Novacek has appeared on NPR’s Performance Today, St. Paul Sunday and (as featured composer/performer) A Prairie Home Companion. A much sought-after chamber musician, Novacek has performed with Yo-Yo Ma, Joshua Bell, Lynn Harrell, Emmanuel Pahud, Truls Mork, Matt Haimovitz, Cho-Liang Lin, Elmar Oliveira and Leila Josefowicz. Novacek’s own compositions and arrangements have been performed by the Pacific Symphony, the 5 Browns, the Ying Quartet, and the Three Tenors. He has recorded for Philips, Nonesuch, Arabesque, Warner Classics, Sony/BMG, Koch International, New World, Universal Classics, Ambassador, Pony Canyon, Four Winds, and EMI Classics. He received a 2004 GRAMMY nomination for “Best Chamber Music Performance.”

“Superb cellist” and “…among Baltimore’s most popular musicians”, are but two of the accolades from the Baltimore Sun, regarding the performances of Gita Ladd. Ms. Ladd has been one of the most sought after cellists of the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area for almost twenty years. For most of that time she performed as a titled member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, including several appearances as Principal Cello for the annual “Messiah” performances and at the SummerMusicFest Series. Ms. Ladd is currently Principal Cello with the Baltimore Opera Company, Concert Artists of Baltimore, and Post Classical Ensemble of Washington D.C. During the summer, Ms. Ladd performs as Principal Cello at the Endless Mountain Music Festival in Wellsboro, PA. She has also performed as Principal Cello with the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, the Baltimore Choral Arts Society, Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra, Assistant Principal Cello of the Knoxville Symphony and a member of the Cincinnati Symphony Pops with Eric Kunzel. Ms. Ladd also performs throughout the year at the Kennedy Center with various ensembles including the Washington Opera, Washington Ballet, Washington Chorale and American Ballet Theatre.

Violinist Airi Yoshioka has concertized throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and Canada as a recitalist, soloist and chamber musician.  Deeply committed to chamber music, she is the founding member of the Damocles Trio and Modigliani Quartet and has performed and recorded with the members of the Emerson, Brentano and Arditti Quartets.  Damocles Trio’s debut disc of complete Piano Trios and Piano Quartet of Joquín Turina has won a four-star rating from the BBC Music Magazine, Le Monde de la Musique and Diapason.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with UMBC ID

Images: Photos of Gita Ladd and Airi Yoshioka by Richard Anderson. Photo of John Novacek by Peter Schaaf.


3Dprinter_printing_Jan2014Visual Arts & Technology
Monday, May 5 | 12 Noon – 1:00 p.m.
CIRCA Catalyst
With presenters Jan Baum and Eric Dyer
Dresher Center Conference Room (216 Performing Arts and Humanities Building)

CIRCA Catalyst is an ongoing series promoting conversations around transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that fuses the performing and visual arts with other fields of inquiry and scholarship. A catered lunch, with vegetarian options, will be provided by CIRCA (the Center for Innovation, Research and Creativity in the Arts).

Catalyst Program:
Towson University Professor Jan Baum is the Executive Director of 3D Maryland, a statewide leadership initiative to advance engagement with 3D digital tools. Her talk will focus on innovation with regard to rapid technologies such as 3D printing which have application across disciplines as well as the 3D Maryland initiative.

UMBC Associate Professor Eric Dyer creates films and installation art from a mix of animation, sculpture, and cinema. He will focus on recent projects and experiments that use digital fabrication to bring computer generated motion imagery into the ‘real’ world.

Presenter Bios:
Jan Baum is an innovator and evangelist for making the world a better place whether through technology, design, education, or business. An early adopter and passionate technologist she is always trying new things. As the Executive Director of 3D Maryland she is leading Maryland’s rapid tech ecosystem coordinating expertise and resources to build high-level engagement throughout Maryland across industries. As an educator with 20-years of experience Baum has developed leading edge curriculum from social design to digital fabrication, and traditional, digital, and hybrid and academic programs. She created Object Lab, a state-of-the-art rapid technology and digital fabrication at Towson University, and was a finalist for Smart CEO Leader in Technology award in 2012. Her own work has been exhibited and published internationally and is in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Museum of American Art. Baum presents and publishes regularly.

Eric Dyer is an artist, filmmaker, experimental animator, and educator. His award-winning films have screened internationally at numerous festivals, including the Chicago International Film Festival, the Ann Arbor Film Festival, South by Southwest, and the Ottawa, Annecy, Melbourne, and London International Animation Festivals. His work has also been exhibited at the Exploratorium, the Hirshhorn, the Smithsonian National Gallery of Art, Ars Electronica, and the Cairo and Venice Biennales.

He was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship in filmmaking for travel to Denmark in 2005, and was a New Frontier Artist at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival. As a member of the Visual Arts faculty at UMBC in Baltimore, he teaches animation and brings students and symphony orchestras together to create music visualizations and animation performances. In 2008 his students presented with the Brooklyn Philharmonic. He has taught workshops at institutions such as ECNU in Shanghai and CalArts. Dyer has received Animasivo, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and Ammerman Center for Art and Technology commissions, and has recently been awarded an Imaging Research Center Summer Research Fellowship, Creative Capital grant, and Guggenheim Fellowship. He is represented by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York.


e5EcSjkRBcAQEpXshdld1S6idbgeAe9l3LWFqr2X3EI,jOSTgn4txyjeG1yFnJeVwpKBt3vwtMlxwdeB0Dbc3CcMusic
Monday, May 5 | 8:00 p.m.
UMBC Wind Ensemble
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Wind Ensemble as it celebrates Cinco de Mayo with Marquez’s Danzon No. 2 and array of exciting brass and wind music. The program includes works by Grieg, Dukas, Press and Suppe (under the direction of Brian Kaufman). Come ready to dance!

The Ensemble is comprised of exceptional woodwind, brass and percussion musicians who enjoy the challenge of performing excellent concert literature.

Admission is free.


think_create_engage_red1Music
Wednesday, May 7 | 8:00 p.m.
UMBC Chamber Players
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Chamber Players under the direction of Airi Yoshioka. The Chamber Players investigate the instrumental chamber works of Western Art Music, ranging from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic to contemporary repertoire.

Admission is free.


Crab_Bluefloor_Tan_Water_ArmymanInterdisciplinary
Thursday, May 8 | 4:30 p.m.
CIRCA Catalyst
With presenters: Colette Searls, Theatre, and Lynn Tomlinson, Visual Arts
216 Performing Arts and Humanities Building

CIRCA Catalyst is an ongoing series promoting conversations around transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that fuses the performing and visual arts with other fields of inquiry and scholarship. A catered lunch, with vegetarian options, will be provided by CIRCA. 

Department of Theater Associate Professor Colette Searls and independent animator Lynn Tomlinson will present their collaborative research uniting Searls’ work in live performance puppetry with Tomlinson’s painterly clay-on-glass animation. The team is working with UMBC’s Imaging Research Center to create a prototype app that animates characters directly through an iPad touch-screen interface. Their prototype digital puppet will be used as a tool to create a short film about a crab that collects sea trash entitled “Hoarder Crab.”

Colette Searls is a stage director with a particular interest in visual theatre and puppetry. At UMBC, Professor Searls has taught acting, directed a mixture of classical and contemporary works, and created award-winning original puppet plays. She has received grants from the Jim Henson Foundation and Puppeteers of America for her original work in found-object puppetry aimed at adult audiences, provided puppetry coaching for professional theatre companies, published and lectured internationally on her digital puppetry research, and served on the UNIMA-USA board of trustees. In 2013, she received a grant to work with award-winning animator Lynn Tomlinson and a team of programmers to create a new digital puppetry app for artists.

Lynn Tomlinson investigates expanded animation projects as a scholar, curator, and artist, reflecting her interest in hybrid art forms and interdisciplinary practices. Current projects include digital puppetry, full-dome experimentation, projection mapping, and interdisciplinary collaborations in performing and media arts. Her clay-on-glass animated shorts have been official selections in festivals internationally and have aired on children’s public television, MTV, and Sesame Street. Her half-hour PBS documentary and her artistic direction of folkvine.org both involved using animation techniques in non-fiction forms. Her current work explores environmental change, the subjectivity of objects, and the poetics of scale. She also develops community-based art projects and has led a series of workshops using animation and technology to engage and empower girls and young women. Her work is profiled in The Animation Bible.


lpex4ERRS2UsX60xc2ImI21ufKel5buhgVdhqvazhnw,bT_5a7vHqB8VFk28MpqHeKjZCiH_VM62dGPGLI7kpmMMusic
Thursday, May 8 | 8:00 p.m.
UMBC Percussion Ensemble
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Percussion Ensemble under the direction of Michelle Humphreys. The UMBC Percussion Ensemble is a dedicated performing group of advanced percussion students. The ensemble is adventurous in its programming, with a repertoire that includes graphic-notation pieces, improvisational works, and theatre, as well as works by important early percussion composers, such as Alan Hovhaness, John Cage and Carlos Chavez. The Ensemble has established a tradition of performing works by UMBC’s faculty and student composers, who sometimes include members of the ensemble.

Admission is free.


 

IdaChagallVisual Arts
Continues through May 21
Performing Womanhood
Special Collections, Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The Albin O. Kuhn Special Collections and Gallery presents Performing Womanhood. The exhibition features portraits of women by women photographers, and displays images made from the  1920s through the 1990s.  The styles of the portraits vary greatly but share the photographers expressing themselves as a women. Photographs chosen for the exhibition ask viewers to consider the idea of women-only spaces and the lack of the male gaze.

Included in the show are works by such notable photographers as Kristin Capp, Cary Beth Cryor, Judy Dater, Sandi Fellman, Peggy Fox, Mildred Grossman, Irina Ionesco, Lotte Jacobi, Mary Ellen Mark and Gerda Peterich. These artists captured famous women, anonymous women, and women with whom they share a relationship.

Performing Womanhood was curated by Jazmin Smith, an Art History and Museum Studies major, with help from the staff at the Albin O. Kuhn Special Collections and Library Gallery.

The Special Collections Department is located in the Albin O. Kuhn Library and open Monday through Friday 1p.m. to 4p.m., Thursdays until 8p.m., and by appointment. For more information call (410)-455-2353 or send an email to speccoll@umbc.edu.

Image: Ida Chagall, 1945, Lotte Jacobi


 

think_create_engage_red1Music
Tuesday, May 13 | 8:00 p.m.
Department of Music Honors Recital
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents an Honors Recital.

Admission is free.

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