Fall 2012

20919Music
Thursday, September 6
Trio Inconnu
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

Trio Inconnu, featuring pianist Stanley Sisskin, violinist Claudia Chudacoff (pictured) and cellist Jodi Beder, will perform an evening of trios, featuring:

  • Trio No. 25 in E minor, Hob. XV/12 by Joseph Haydn
  • Trio No. 2 in B minor, Op. 76 by Joaquín Turina
  • Trio No. 1 in B major, Op. 8 by Johannes Brahms

Pianist Stanley Sisskin received a Bachelor’s degree in music from the University of California at Berkeley, a post-graduate degree in accompanying from the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London, and a Master’s Degree in Accompanying and Chamber Music from the Manhattan School of Music. Mr. Sisskin was the silver medal winner of the New York International Competition for Outstanding Amateur Pianists in 2004 and 2006. He has frequently appeared as soloist with the New York Piano Society, and as soloist with the Broadway Bach Ensemble, a New York–based community orchestra. In 2009, he performed a solo recital in the Rose Studio of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Mr. Sisskin was chosen to play concerto movements with the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra as part of the PianoTexas festival, and with the New York Concerti Sinfonietta.

Violinist Claudia Chudacoff appears frequently as soloist and chamber musician throughout the Washington area. She is a member of both the Sunrise Quartet and the National Gallery Quartet, and has performed regularly on several chamber series, including the Embassy Series, the Holocaust Memorial Museum, National Musical Arts, and the Contemporary Music Forum, and with the Fessenden Ensemble. In 2011, Ms. Chudacoff participated along with the Sunrise Quartet in the International Festival of Sacred Music in Quito, Ecuador. She also appeared in a recent broadcast for West Virginia Public Television featuring that group. She can be heard on many recordings and radio broadcasts, including several appearances on National Public Radio’s Performance Today program. In addition to her position as Concertmaster of the U.S. Marine Band’s White House Chamber Orchestra, Ms. Chudacoff is also the Concertmaster of both the National Gallery Orchestra and the Alexandria Symphony.

Jodi Beder is principal cellist of Princeton (New Jersey) Symphony Orchestra and has been principal of Princeton Pro Musica and Riverside Symphonia. In the Washington, D.C. area she has played modern and baroque cello with groups including the National Philharmonic, Washington Bach Consort, the Folger Consort, the Vivaldi Project, and the Low End String Quartet. She plays her famous plugged-in painted cello Zizi in the innovative cabaret-rock band Zen for Primates (CDs on Bummer Tent Records). She is a member of Dovetail, the performing ensemble for the Old Doors/New Worlds project, a collaboration of musicians and dancers from vernacular traditions; their first CD/DVD was released in April 2012. She has collaborated with many poets and dance and theater companies over the years. She currently collaborates with poet Kay Lindsey; and she and playwright Caleen Sinnette Jennings together have created a performance piece called “You Get Me,” for which she co-wrote music and text, and performs as singer, cellist, and pianist. She is an improviser and a committed interpreter of contemporary music, and has performed and recorded for the American Festival of Microtonal Music; she has also been the solo cellist for a synagogue in New York City for nearly 30 years.

Admission to this event is free.


©2006 Craig J. Barber, courtesy George Eastman House

©2006 Craig J. Barber, courtesy George Eastman House

Visual Arts
September 10 – November 17
Ghosts in the Landscape: Vietnam Revisited, Photographs by Craig Barber

The Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Ghosts in the Landscape: Vietnam Revisited, featuring photographs by Craig J. Barber, from September 10 through November 17. Over a four-year period beginning in 1995, photographer Craig Barber, an ex-combat Marine, returned to Vietnam to traverse many of his former military routes, making images with an 8×10 inch pinhole camera. Intended in part as cathartic exercise and in part curiosity about what had become of this once war-torn country, the series of diptych and triptych panorama platinum images created by Barber capture the serene beauty of the country and, at times for the artist, all too memorable landscapes.

The images Barber captured are not documentary. The minutes-long exposure required to record pinhole images produce blurring in anything in motion during the exposure; this sense of movement contributes to both a feel of mystery and a dreamlike, introspective quality.

This exhibition has been organized by the George Eastman House & Museum. The presentation of this exhibition is supported by an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support comes from the Friends of the Library & Gallery, the Libby Kuhn Endowment Fund and the American Legion Towson Post #22, as well as individual contributions.

Thursday, October 18
Craig J. Barber, Artist lecture
6 pm, Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Photographer Craig J. Barber will speak about his work featured in Ghosts in the Landscape.

Talk to be followed by Q&A session and reception.

The Gallery is open Monday through Friday, 12 noon to 4 pm, on Thursday until 8 pm, and Saturday and Sunday 1 – 5 pm. Admission is free. For more information call 410-455-2270.


Kip Viscusi, Vanderbilt university

Kip Viscusi, Vanderbilt university

Social Sciences Forum
Thursday, September 13
“The Value of Statistical Life,” Kip Viscusi, Vanderbilt University, Distinguished Professor
4 pm, 7th Floor, Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery

Social Sciences Forum
Mullen Lecture
Sponsored by the Department of Economics

The value of statistical life (VSL) is the tradeoff between small levels of risk and money.  This measure forms the basis for assessing the benefits of government policies that reduce risks, such as regulatory efforts. Recent economic research has developed estimates of the heterogeneity of the value of statistical life (VSL) on dimensions such as individual age, income, immigrant status, and the nature of the risk exposure. This presentation examines the empirical evidence on the heterogeneity of VSL and explores the potential implications for the valuation of regulatory policies. One example of a situation in which government agencies recognized differences in VLS is that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) unsuccessfully sought to adopt a simple age discount percentage for VSL based on survey evidence. I will discuss the “senior discount” issue as well as differences in VSL with age, income, and immigrant status.

W. Kip Viscusi is Vanderbilt’s first University Distinguished Professor, with primary appointments in the Department of Economics and the Owen Graduate School of Management as well as in the Law School. Professor Viscusi is the award-winning author of more than 20 books and 300 articles, most of which deal with different aspects of health and safety risks. His pathbreaking research has addressed a wide range of individual and societal responses to risk and uncertainty, including risky behaviors, government regulation, and tort liability. He is widely regarded as one of the world’s leading authorities on benefit-cost analysis.


spece-beith01-sMusic
Thursday, September 13
Richard Spece, clarinet and Nancy Beith, piano
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

Clarinetist Richard Spece and pianist Nancy Beith join forces to present a program featuring:

  • Five Bagatelles, Op. 23 by Gerald Finzi
  • Concertino by Giuseppe Tartini (arranged by Gordon Jacob)
  • Clarinet Sonata No. 1, Op. 120, No. by Johannes Brahms
  • Duo Concertant pour Clarinette et Piano by Darius Milhaud

Richard Spece regularly performs on modern and historical clarinets around the country and has several recordings available on Crystal Records. He has been a featured performer on the Smithsonian Recital Series in Washington, D.C., Music in the Mansion Series at the Strathmore in Maryland, Alexander Paley Festival in Virginia, Mozart Society of California Chamber Music Series, the Instituto de la Cultura Festival in Mexico, Cascade Music Festival, Capitol Hill Chamber Music Festival, Garth Newel Chamber Festival, the Embassy Series in Washington, D.C., the National Gallery of Art Chamber Series, and the Festival of Sacred Music in New York City. His teachers included Stan Stanford, William McColl, James Campbell, Alfred Prinz, and Howard Klug. Mr. Spece is a Selmer Concert Artist.

Nancy Beith has been on the music faculty at UMBC since 1980, serving as academic advisor for the department, pianist for both the Camerata and Opera Workshop, and coordinator of the class piano program. She taught for many years in the Preparatory Division of Hood College in Frederick. As a collaborative pianist, Ms. Beith has worked with many area musicians in recital and chamber performances. She has adjudicated piano competitions for Maryland State Music Teachers Association and has been pianist for the International Trombone Workshop in Nashville. Currently she is a pianist for Holy Family Catholic Community in Middletown, Maryland, and the Maryland State Boychoir in Baltimore. Ms. Beith received degrees from Syracuse University and the Peabody Institute. She also studied at the Vienna Academy of Music and Westminster Choir College in Princeton.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.


pahb101Arts & Humanities
Wednesday, September 19
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Grand Opening Celebration
2-9 pm, Various Locations

You are invited to join President Freeman Hrabowski, Governor Martin O’Malley and the UMBC community on Wednesday, September 19 as we celebrate the opening of the first phase of UMBC’s Performing Arts and Humanities Building.

2 p.m.
Phase One Ribbon Cutting and Phase Two Groundbreaking Ceremony with Governor Martin O’Malley
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Entrance

3–6:30 p.m.
Arts and Humanities Festival
Featuring food trucks, UMBC student groups and community performers, and a jazz concert with Lafayette Gilchrist ’92, Africana Studies.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Grounds

3:30–5 p.m.
UMBC and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance Present: New Space
Leaders breaking fresh ground in the region’s cultural land- scape reveal the physical, conceptual, and virtual spaces that motivate their work, answering the question: How do new spaces inspire us to think, create and engage in expected and unexpected ways?
Proscenium Theatre
A limited number of free tickets will be available at the door.

New Space Presenters:

  • Wendy Salkind, UMBC Theatre & Jessica Berman, UMBC English
  • Fred Lazarus, MICA & Tim Nohe, UMBC Visual Arts
  • Vincent Lancisi, Everyman Theatre & David Mitchell, Arena Players
  • Doreen Bolger, BMA & George Ciscle, founder, The Contemporary
  • Liz Lerman, Choreographer & Sharayna Christmas Rose, Muse 360
  • Kalima Young, The Baltimore Art + Justice Project & Nicole King, UMBC American Studies
  • Marvin Pinkert, Jewish Museum of Maryland & Kevin Griffin Moreno ‘95, Full Circle Storytelling

Moderator: Tom Hall, Baltimore Choral Arts Society & WYPR Radio Host

4:30–6:30 p.m.
Tours of the building

7–8:30 p.m.
Inaugural Lecture: The Humanities Forum Presents “The Humanities, Without Apology,” featuring Pauline Yu, President of the American Council of Learned Societies
Proscenium Theatre, followed by dessert reception in PAHB Lobby
Students, faculty, and staff can pick up free tickets at The Commons information desk until September 18. Tickets will also be available at the door.
(See separate calendar listing for additional details.)

WYPR is an official media sponsor of this event.


Pauline YuHumanities Forum
Wednesday, September 19
“The Humanities, Without Apology,” Pauline Yu, President of the American Council of Learned Societies
7 pm, Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

There is much lamentation today about the humanities, most of it unhelpful.  Over the past century, the intellectually dynamic academic humanities have recorded enormous scholarly and educational achievements.  The knowledge conveyed by the humanities today is ever more essential in a nation and world of increasing cultural complexity.

Students, faculty, and staff can pick up free tickets at The Commons information desk September 5-18.  Tickets will also be available at the door.


tom_nunnMusic
Friday, September 21
Tom Nunn, percussionist
12 Noon, Fine Arts Building Studio 508 (Recording Studio)

In partnership with the High Zero Festival, the Department of Music presents percussionist Tom Nunn, whose instruments typically utilize commonly available materials, are sculptural in appearance, utilize contact microphones for amplification, and are designed specifically for improvisation with elements of ambiguity, unpredictability and nonlinearity. Mr. Nunn has designed, built and performed with original musical instruments since 1976, having received a B.Mus. and M.A. in music composition from the University of Texas at Austin and S.U.N.Y. Stony Brook, and post-graduate work at U.C. San Diego.

In addition to the nearly 100 instruments he has made, Mr. Nunn has performed extensively throughout the San Francisco Bay area for over 25 years, as well as in other parts of the U.S., Canada and Europe, both as soloist and with other musicians. He has performed with the groups Rotodoti, Off Ramp, Stritch, Twine, Toax, Reel Change and Ghost In The House, and currently works with Axallto and RTD3.

He has appeared on a number of recordings, including his most recent solo CD, Identity. In 1998, he completed writing and self-published Wisdom of The Impulse: on the nature of musical free improvisation, a book that examines various aspects of this illusive art and presents a theoretical foundation for creative listening, analysis and discussion. Mr. Nunn has also written a number of articles about the use of experimental instruments and improvisation in publications such as Experimental Musical InstrumentsMusicworks and Leonardo.

Admission is free.


Judith Walkowitz

Judith Walkowitz, Johns Hopkins University

Humanities Forum
Thursday, September  27
“Schleppers and Shoppers: Jews, Street Markets and the Selling of Ready-to-Wear Fashion in London in the 1920’s and 1930’s,” Judith Walkowitz, John Hopkins University
5 pm, Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Humanities Forum
Annual Robert K. Webb History Department Lecture

“Schleppers and Shoppers” spotlights a Jewish street market that emerged as the cutting edge retail space for mass market fashion in the West End. Whereas journalists described the smartly-dressed, fast-talking shop assistants locally known as  “schleppers,” and the working-class female patrons they pulled into gown shops as straying from the class codes and styles of established English culture, Jewish Sohoites told hilarious tales of the “schlepper” as a Jewish street character, alternately resembling a red hot mama and a flashily dressed fellow emulating the dress of celluloid gangsters. Their memories recall a safe and modern space of ethnic settlement, simultaneously tied to Soho’s irregular world of sex, crime, and entertainment.


Audrey Andrist, photo by Tom Radcliffe

Audrey Andrist, photo by Tom Radcliffe

Music
Thursday, September 27
Audrey Andrist, pianist
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

Hailed as a “stunning pianist with incredible dexterity” (San Francisco Classical Voice), Canadian pianist Audrey Andristhas thrilled audiences around the globe, from North America to Japan, China and Germany with her “passionate abandon,” “bright energy,” and “great intelligence.” An avid performer of new music with many world premieres to her credit, Ms. Andrist can be heard on over a dozen recordings of both standard and modern repertoire on the Albany, Centredisques, and New Focus labels, among others. She currently lives in the Washington, D.C. area, where she has performed at the Library of Congress, Wolf Trap, and the Smithsonian Institutions. Her CD of major solo works by Robert Schumann has just been released on Centaur Records. She is an affiliate artist in UMBC’s Department of Music.

Ms. Andrist’s program will feature:

  • Impromptu in B-flat Major, Op. 142, No. 2, D.935/2 by Franz Schubert
  • After Dark…, Op. 24 by Andrew Paul MacDonald
  • Sonata in E-flat Major, Op. 31, No. 3 (“The Hunt”) by Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Phantasie, Op. 17 by Robert Schumann

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. Tickets will be available in early fall 2012.


James  R. Bartholomew, Ohio State University

James R. Bartholomew, Ohio State University

Social Sciences Forum
Wednesday, October 3
“Japanese Science and International Politics in the Interwar Period,” James R. Bartholomew, Professor of History and Ohio State University
4 pm, Albin O. Kuhn library Gallery

Social Sciences Forum
Sponsored by the Asian Studies Program, the Department of History and the Human Context of Science and Technology Program

James Bartholomew is a specialist in modern Japanese history, chiefly interested in the history of science, medicine, higher education, and business in Japan. In 1985-86, he held a research fellowship from the National Science Foundation. His 1989 book, The Formation of Science in Japan, received the1992 Pfizer Award of the History of Science Society and was issued in paperback in February 1993. In March 2001, he was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship to write a book on Japan and the Nobel science prizes, 1901-1949.


Even the RainMLLI
También la Lluvia (Even the Rain)
Wednesday, October 3
7:15 pm, University  Center Ballroom Lounge
Friday, October 12
7 pm, Lecture Hall IV

Filmmaker Sebastian (Gael Garcia Bernal) and his cynical producer Costa (Luis Tosar) arrive in Cochabamba, Bolivia to make a film about Columbus’s voyage to the New World and the subjugation of the indigenous population. Just as film making begins, the natives face a crisis when the government privatizes the water company and prices skyrocket.  Daily protests erupt and the local man cast as a rebellious 16th century Taino chief also becomes a leader in the water hike protest.

Dir Iciar Bollian. Co-production Spain, Mexico, France. 2010.

Film is in Spanish with English Subtitles.

John Sinnigen, professor of Spanish, will lead a discussion of the film.

Part of UMBC’s Spanish language film series: Discovering New Film from Spain and Latin America.

The Spanish Film Club Series was made possible with the support of Pragda, the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain, and its Program for Cultural Cooperation with united States’ Universities.

The film is co-sponsored by the departments of Education, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Geography and Environmental Studies; the Language, Literacy and Culture and Media and Communication Studies programs; the Honors College; and the New Media Studio.

This film is co-sponsored by PROMISE.


StephSpinning225wDance
Friday and Saturday, October 5 and 6
Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh Dance Company
8 pm, Old Theatre

Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh Dance Company is an emerging dance company that performs and presents Indian dance forms, such as Bharata Natyam, and Modern dance, mirroring the multiple identities of second generation South Asians. The company combines the arts with social justice issues both by incorporating the themes into their work and via partnerships with local community centers and schools. Their program will feature both traditional Indian dance and reconstructed works by Anna Sokolow.

The program will feature three works:

  • Keerthanam, a composition by Papanasan Sivan
  • Vasanth, 2011, choreographed by Daniel Singh
  • Lyric Suite, 1953, Company Premiere, choreographed by Anna Sokolow

$15 general admission, $10 students and seniors. To order tickets in advance, order online using MissionTix.


combat paperHistory
October 8 – December 10
Combat Paper Project
UMBC Special Collections, Albin O. Kuhn Library

UMBC Special Collections will host an exhibition of the Combat Paper Project from October 8 through December 10.

The Combat Paper Project utilizes art making workshops to assist veterans in reconciling and sharing their personal experiences as well as broadening the traditional narrative surrounding service and the military culture.

Through papermaking workshops veterans use their uniforms worn in combat to create cathartic works of art. The uniforms are cut up, beaten into a pulp and formed into sheets of paper. Veterans use the transformative process of papermaking to reclaim their uniform as art and begin to embrace their experiences in the military.

The Combat Paper Project is a moving example of the ways in which art enables military veterans to communicate and process their experiences.  Through art, veterans record observations and express opinions. They explore their relationships with comrades and combatants. They depict suffering and survival.

The Combat Paper Project began almost accidentally. In 2004, Drew Cameron, a veteran of the United States Army, took Drew Mattot’s papermaking workshop at the Green Door Studio in Vermont. Together, the two men designed several artistic projects to engage veterans and draw attention to their experiences. The Combat Paper Project was born in 2007 when Cameron, in an act of performance art, cut up his old uniform and made paper from it.

The Combat Paper Project remains a collaborative effort to engage civilians and veterans in a conversation about war and military service. The Project operates out of a number of studios across the country and Project artists organize workshops to teach veterans the art of papermaking. Works from the project have been exhibited in libraries, museums, and universities.

This selection of works from the Combat Paper Project has been organized for the University of Maryland, Baltimore County by the curators of the Library Gallery and with the generous sponsorship of the Department of American Studies, the Department of History, the Dresher Center for the Humanities, and the Office of Off Campus Student Services.

Special Collections is open Monday through Friday, 12 noon to 4 pm, on Thursday until 8 pm. Admission is free.  The Special Collections Department of the Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery collects, houses, preserves, and makes accessible materials that are original, rare, unique, fragile, historical, and archival.


Marden Nichols, Assistant Curator at the Walters Art MuseumHumanities Forum
Wednesday, October 10
“Not Always Roman, Not Always  Statues: The Recent Lives of Ancient Roman Statues at the Walters Art Museum,” Marden Nichols, Assistant Curator, Walters Art Museum
5 pm, Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Humanities Forum
Ancient Studies Week Lecture

During the first decades of the 20th century, Henry Walters purchased several marble statues formed from mismatched ancient heads and bodies conjoined for the purposes of the antiquities market. This lecture traces the origins of these statues back to nineteenth-century European collections. It examines how over time changing attitudes towards antiquity and evolving techniques of research and conservation have altered not only the interpretation of these statues, but even their material form.


AmerikanuakMLLI
Wednesday, October 10
Amerikanuak
7:15 pm, University Center Ballroom Lounge

More than a half a century ago, many Basques left Spain looking for a better life working as sheepherders in the American West. In Amerikanuak, Nach Reig looks at the lives at some of the last remaining Basque sheepherders in the U.S.  The documentary takes place under the vast blue skies and the bleak but beautiful winter landscape of the small town of Elko, Nevada.

Dir. Ignacio Reig. Spain. 2010.

Film will be in Basque and English with subtitles in English.

Dr. Ana Oskoz will lead a discussion of the film.

Part of UMBC’s Spanish-Language Film Festival: Discovering New Film from Spain and Latin America

The Spanish Film Club series was made possible with the support of Pragda, the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain, and its Program for Cultural Cooperation with United States’ Universities.

The film series is co-sponsored by the departments of Education, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Geography and Environmental Studies; the Honors College, the Language, Literacy and Culture program, the New Media Studio, and the Media and Communication Studies program.


SpiroAncient Studies
Thursday, October 11 
Spiro Artifact Collection
11 am – 1 pm, UMBC Commons

Ancient Studies Students present their research on artifacts from the Spiro Artifact Collection.

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straightjacketAmerican Studies
Friday, October 12
“Straitjacket Sexualities: Unbinding Asian American Manhoods in the Movies,” Celine Parreñas Shimizu, Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara
1 pm, Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This event is sponsored by the department of American Studies with support from the Asian studies and gender and women’s studies programs.

Join the departments of American Studies, Asian Studies, and Gender and Women’s Studies for “Straitjacket Sexualities: Unbinding Asian American Manhoods in the Movies,” a lecture by filmmaker and scholar Celine Parreñas Shimizu.

Celine Parreñas Shimizu is Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she is also affiliate faculty in Comparative Literature, Feminist and Film and Media Studies
Shimizu is the author of the book Straitjacket Sexualities: Unbinding Asian American Manhoods in the Movies, which David L. Eng of the University of Pennsylvania called “an utterly original examination of Asian American masculinity on the silver screen, Straitjacket Sexualities is a critical tour-de-force that reveals cinema to be an ethical event. It offers a theory of responsibility in the face of vulnerability and persecution to encourage the emergence of new and better forms of manhood.”
David Palumbo-Liu of  Stanford University said that the book is “an exciting contribution to Asian American, film, and gender and sexuality studies, one which many will find liberatory as well. A perfect sequel to her book on Asian American female sexualities.”

Michael Berubé, President, MLA

Michael Berubé, President, MLA

Humanities Forum
Monday, October 15
“Disability, Justice and the Future of the Humanities,” Michael Berubé, President, Modern Language Association
7 pm, Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

Humanities Forum
Co-Sponsored with the Department of English

This talk will discuss how the disciplines of the humanities create and challenge our definitions of the human– an ancient question, of course, but one that has been reinvigorated in recent years by the advent of disability studies.  The study of disability has profound implications for our self-understanding, insofar as it brings new perspectives to the study of literature, history, philosophy, and society.  And those new perspectives, in turn, can help to shape the future of the humanities– and the future of humanity.


(c) 2006 Craig J. Barber, courtesy George Eastman House

(c) 2006 Craig J. Barber, courtesy George Eastman House

Fine Arts
Thursday, October 18
Craig J. Barber, Artist Lecture
6 pm, Albin O, Kuhn Library Gallery

Photographer and ex-combat marine Craig J. Barber will speak about his photographs that appear in the exhibition Ghosts in the Landscape: Vietnam Revisited, on display in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery now through November 17, 2012.

Barber’s talk will be followed by a Q&A session and reception.

Admission to this event is free.


cummings 2Thursday, October 18
“Empowering Young Americans: A Conversation With Congressman Elijah Cummings,” Congressman Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland’s 7th District
4 pm, University Center Ballroom

Please join Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, for a discussion with Congressman Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland’s 7th District.

Congressman Cummings has dedicated his life of service to uplifting and empowering the people he is sworn to represent. He began his career of public service in the Maryland House of Delegates, where he served for 14 years and became the first African American in Maryland history to be named Speaker Pro Tem. Since 1996, Congressman Cummings has proudly represented Maryland’s 7th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives.

This event is free and open to the entire UMBC campus community.

Presented by the Africana Studies Council of Majors.


corrado_greco_colMusic
Saturday, October 20
“Inside Out: Music from the Depths”
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

Featuring Italian pianist Corrado Greco, UMBC faculty E. Michael Richards (clarinet), Christian Tremblay (violin) and Alicia Ward (cello), this concert celebrates music that comes from difficult places, showcasing works by musicians with unique experiential and educational perspectives. The concert features works by Edison Denisov, a Russian composer whose music was banned in the Soviet Union due to its “Western influences”; Linda Dusman, whose music sounds out archetypes and the collective unconscious reflected in her studies of Jungian psychology; and Messiaen’s iconic Quartet for the End of Time, which speaks of hope to the world from the darkness of a World War II prisoner of war camp.

The program will feature:

Sonata for Solo Clarinet by Edison Denisov (1929-1996) — Performed by E. Michael Richards, clarinet

from Interiors (world premiere) by Linda Dusman (b. 1956) — Performed by Corrado Greco, piano

  • ii. Glacial Till
  • iii. Susurrus

Quatour pour la fin du temps (Quartet for the End of Time) by Olivier Messiaen (1908-1992) — Performed by E. Michael Richards, clarinet; Christian Tremblay, violin; Alicia Ward, cello; Corrado Greco, piano

  • i. Liturgie de cristal
  • ii. Vocalise, pour l’Ange qui annonce la fin du Temps
  • iii. Abîme des oiseaux
  • iv. Intermède
  • v. Louange à l’Éternite dé Jésus
  • vi. Danze de la fureur, pour les sept trompettes
  • vii. Fouillis d’arc-en-ciel, pour l’Ange qui annonce la fin du Temps
  • viii. Louange à l’Immortalite de Jésus
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

jazzensemble02-sMusic
Sunday, October 21
UMBC Jazz Ensemble
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Jazz Ensemble under the direction of Matthew Belzer.

Admission is free, suggested donation $15. (Funds raised through ticket sales for this event will be administered by the UMBC Foundation for the benefit of UMBC.)


Sean F. Reardon, Stanford University

Sean F. Reardon, Stanford University

Social Sciences Forum
Wednesday, October 24
“Educational Inequality,” Sean Reardon, Stanford University School of Education
4 pm, Albin O. Kuhn Library, 7th floor

Social Sciences Forum

Sean F. Reardon is associate professor in the Stanford University School of Education. His research investigates the causes, patterns, trends, and consequences of social and educational inequality. In particular, he studies issues of residential and school segregation and of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in academic achievement and educational success. In addition, his work develops methods of measuring social and educational inequality (including the measurement of segregation and achievement gaps) and methods of causal inference in educational and social science research.


From the Land to Your TableMLLI
Wednesday, October 24 | 7:15 p.m.
Qué Culpa Tiene el Tomate (From the Land to Your Table)
7:15 pm, University Center Ballroom Lounge

What do you get when you take seven directors from seven different countries with seven different cultures and points of view? From the Land to Your Table shows the perspectives of seven different talented film makers and directors from throughout Latin America as they capture the conditions and cultural diversity of produce markets in their individual countries. Each segment retains its own unique style and tone as it leads the view through the fascinating story of the foods that eventually wind up on our tables, and sheds a light on illnesses such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia treatments in different countries around the world.

Dir. Alejo Hoijman, Josué Mendez, Carolina Navas,
Paola Vieira, Alejandra Szeplaki, Jorge Coira & Marcos Loayza Montoya.Co-production Argentina, Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, Brazil, Venezuela, Spain. 2009.

Film will be in Spanish, Portugese, Galician, and Aymara with English subtitles.

Dr. John Stolle-McAllister will lead a discussion the film.

Part of UMBC’s Spanish-Language Film Festival: Discovering New Film from Spain and Latin America

The Spanish Film Club series was made possible with the support of Pragda, the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain, and its Program for Cultural Cooperation with United States’ Universities.

The film series is co-sponsored by the departments of Education, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Geography and Environmental Studies; the Honors College, the Language, Literacy and Culture program, the New Media Studio, and the Media and Communication Studies program.


goldstein01-sMusic
Wednesday, October 24
Livewire 3: Tom Goldstein, Evening Drums
8 pm, Fine Arts Building Studio 508

The Livewire 3 Music Festival presents a performance by Tom Goldstein. A freelance percussionist for over twenty years in New York, Tom Goldstein (associate professor of Music at UMBC) has performed extensively with the Orchestra of St. Lukes and the Brooklyn Philharmonic. Especially active in contemporary music, he has premiered dozens of solo and chamber works, many written expressly for him.  From 1980-1990 he served as Artistic Director of the new-music group GAGEEGO. Mr. Goldstein has toured with Steve Reich, played with Pauline Oliveros and the ensemble Continuum. He has published articles in Perspectives of New Music, Percussive Notes, and for Mellen Press. He currently performs and records with the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo (piano/percussion), the new music ensemble Ruckus, and the klezmer band Verklempt. He has recorded on the Neuma, Vanguard, Polydor, Opus 1, O.O. Discs, CD Tech, Capstone, Innova and CRI labels.

Goldstein’s program, Evening Drums, will feature percussionists Wendy Salkind, Michelle Purdy, Will Redman and Rob Wolk:

  • Right Left Left Right (2000) by Rachel Goldstein, (world premiere)
  • He’s Lost His Marbles (2001) by Tom Goldstein
  • Quo (2001) by Tom Goldstein
  • Read Your Assoff (1990) by Tom Pierson
  • Genderang Senja (Evening Drums) (1990) by Ben Pasaribu
  • Miss Fur and Miss Skeene (2010) by Gertrude Stein/Linda Dusman
  • Evergreen (2005) by Tom Goldstein

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

1Music 
Thursday, October 25
Livewire 3: John Cage, Then and Now
7 pm, Fine Arts Building, Room 215

The Livewire 3 Music Festival presents a pre-concert panel discussion with David Revill, Elliott Schwartz and Thomas Moore.

Music
Thursday, October 25
Livewire 3: Ruckus
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Livewire 3 festival presents a concert by Ruckus, the faculty contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC, featuring Lisa Cella (flute), Tom Goldstein (percussion), E. Michael Richards (clarinet), Airi Yoshioka (violin), Gita Ladd (cello), Audrey Andrist (piano), Lura Johnson (piano) and Jacqueline Pollauf (harp). The program will consist of:

  • An Insular Style, 1980 by Jo Kondo
  • Five, 1988 by John Cage
  • Voice of The Whale, 1971 by George Crumb
  • Flan, 1991 by Elliott Schwartz
  • Ice Age, 1954 by Henry Brant

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

Music
Friday, October 26
Livewire 3: Disklavier Concert 1
10:30 am, Fine Arts Recital Hall Lobby

The Livewire 3 music festival presents the first of three Disklavier concerts in the Recital Hall Lobby featuring music composed by UMBC faculty, students, and alumni made possible by the generous support of Menchy Music Service Inc.

In this performance, the disklavier will play music by Matthew Belzer, Jacob Housand and Jacob Foster.

Admission is free.

Music
Friday, October 26
Concert of Electronic Music
11 am, Fine Arts Building Studio 508

This Livewire 3 event will feature computer generated music and analog electronic devices, with lighting and dance choreographed by Mimi Gerrard.

  • Phosphones (1970-71) by Emmanuel Ghent
  • East River Dawn (1976) by Laurie Spiegel
  • Bye Bye Butterfly (1965) by Pauline Oliveros
  • Arturo by Elianne Lillios
  • Railcar (2008) by Judy Klein

A talk with composer Judy Klein will precede the concert.

Admission is free.

Music 
Friday, October 26
Livewire 3: Disklavier Concert 2
2:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall Lobby

The Livewire 3 Music Festival, presents the second of three Disklavier concerts in the Recital Hall Lobby featuring music composed by UMBC faculty, students, and alumni, made possible by the generous support of Menchy Music Service Inc.

In this performance, the Disklavier will play music by Alan Wonneberger, Justin Mann, and Linda Dusman.

Admission is free.

Music
Friday, October 26
Livewire 3: Chamber Music Concert
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Livewire 3 festival presents a chamber music concert featuring Audrey Andrist, piano; Lisa Cella, flute; Gita Ladd, cello; E. Michael Richards, clarinet; Kazuko Tanosaki, piano; and Umbilicus, a percussion quartet consisting of Tom Goldstein, Michelle Purdy, Will Redman and Rob Wolk. The program will consist of:

  • Two and One by Daniel Adams
  • Solo et + (2009) by Farangis Nurulla-Khoja (World premiere)
  • Souvenir (1974) by Elliott Schwartz
  • Four Maine Haiku (1984) by Elliott Schwartz
  • Snare Drum for Camus (1982) by Joseph Celli

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

Due East plays MakiMusic
Friday, October 26
Livewire 3: Due East
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

Due East, consisting of percussionist Greg Beyer and flutist Erin Lesser, performs for the Livewire 3 Music Festival. The duo has performed in Brazil, Europe, Canada and the USA at venues such as the Warsaw Crossdrumming Festival, the Banff Centre for the Arts, the SEAMUS conference, Bargemusic, the National Flute Association Conventions in Kansas and New York and the Percussive Arts Society International Conventions in Texas, Tennessee and Ohio. The duo’s first recording, Simultaneous Worlds, is scheduled for release on Albany Records in October, 2010. They can also be heard on the Brazilian label, Gravina Música.

The program will feature:

  • Among Fireflies (2010) by Elaine Lillios
  • Yodeling Song (2012) by Alexis Bacon
  • Cowboy Song (2008) by Alexis Bacon
  • Capoeirista (2011) by Chester Udell
  • Incantations (2010) by Michel Galante
  • Only The Words Themselves Mean What They Say (2010-11) by Kate Soper, text by Lydia Davis
  • Purl (2006) by Kate Soper
  • Ligare (2006) by Alexandre Lunsqui

Pre-concert Talk
7:00 pm, Fine Arts Building 215

A free pre-concert talk will feature composers Alexis Bacon, Farangis Nurulla-Khoja, Kate Soper and David Revill.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

Music
Saturday, October 27
Livewire 3: Disklavier Concert 3
3:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall Lobby

The Livewire 3 Music Festival, presents the last of three Disklavier concerts in the Recital Hall Lobby featuring music composed by UMBC faculty, students, and alumni, made possible by the generous support of Menchy Music Service Inc.

The Disklavier will perform compositions by Anna Rubin, Chuck Miller, Rob Wolk and Colin Holter.

Admission is free.

press_photo1Music
Saturday, October 27 | 4:00 p.m.
Livewire 3: Neil Feather and Eric Franklin are Elephantitans
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Neil Feather and Eric Franklin perform ear-bending works on Feather’s radical and unusual musical instruments for the Livewire 3 Music Festival. The performance will feature a Former Guitar duet, Wiggler solo, and Vibrowheel duet.

IMG401jpgMusic
Saturday, October 27 | 8:00 p.m.
Livewire 3: Stephen Drury, pianist
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Stephen Drury teaches piano at New England Conservatory and is artistic director and conductor of the Callithumpian Consort. He is also founder and director of the Summer Institute for Contemporary Performance Practice at New England Conservatory, which has featured music by composers such as John Cage, Steve Reich, Christian Wolff, Frederic Rzewski, and Jonathan Harvey. Drury earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard College and an Artist Diploma from the New England Conservatory. He studied piano with Claudio Arrau, Patricia Zander, William Masselos, Margaret Ott, and Theodore Lettvin, and conducting with Donald Thulean.

Mr. Drury’s Livewire 3 program will feature:

  • Carny by John Zorn
  • Etudes Australes, Book 3 by John Cage
  • Hay Una Mujer Desaparecida by Christian Wolff
  • Piano Sonata No. 2, Concord, Mass., 1840–1860 by Charles Ives

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

Music
Sunday, October 28
Livewire 3: Ensemble Π
12:30 pm, Composer Panel Discussion
1:30 pm, Concert
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Livewire3 Music Festival presents New York based Ensemble Π. The group, consisting of performers Karl Kramer (horn), Kristin Norderval (voice), Barry J. Crawford (flute), Katie Schlaikjer (cello), Idith Meshulam (piano), UMBC Assistant Professor Airi Yoshioka (violin), Moran Katz (clarinet) and William Trigg (percussion), is an “evocative and compelling” group known for its innovative and exciting programs that premiere commissioned works of contemporary composers.

In the past 4 years, Ensemble Π has presented a Peace Project—an annual multi-media event at the Cooper Union. The project’s goal is to make a space for a dialogue between ideas and music on the great issues of the day, through commissioning new works and collaborating with visual artists, writers, actors, and journalists. Collaborators have included the South African artist William Kentridge, American journalist/writer Naomi Wolf, Iraqi actress Namaa Alward, and Israeli philosopher/activist Anat Biletzki. In the last three years, Ensemble Π has created artistic and educational programs in response to major exhibitions at the Chelsea Art Museum, the Rubin Museum of Himalayan Art, and the Museum of Modern Art.

Ensemble Pi, praised as “A socially conscious new music group” by Time Out New York, will be performing the Annual Concert of the International Alliance for Women in Music (IAWM). The program will feature:

  • Inner Space for cello and electronics by Kyong Mee Choi
  • Oh, Death, Rock Me Asleep for violin and voice by Jerry Casey
  • Illuminated Shadows of Louise Nelson for clarinet, violin and piano by Molly Joyce
  • Generation for piano and electronics by Maureen Reyes Lavastida
  • Tracing for trombone and electronics by Frances White
  • Inori-Prayer for piano and cello by Kanako Okamoto
  • Butterfly Mirrors for voice, piano and cello by Mara Melmuth
  • Three Stones for clarinet and electronics by Heather Stebbins

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

Pre-concert Composer Panel Discussion
12:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

A free pre-concert panel discussion with composers Jerry Casey (Ohio, US); Molly Joyce (NYC, US); Maureen Reyes Lavastida (Cuba); Kanako Okamoto (Japan); Mara Helmuth (Cincinnati, US); Heather Stebbins (Boston, US); Hsaio-Lan Wang (Texas and Taiwan), President of the International Alliance for Women in Music (IAWM), Moderator.


timmillerTheatre
Friday, November 2
Glory Box, Tim Miller, performance artist
8 pm, Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

“A charming and wildly energetic storyteller!”
The New York Times

Glory Box is a funny, sexy and charged exploration of Tim Miller’s journeys through the challenge of love, marriage equality for gay Americans, and the struggle for immigration rights for gay Americans and their partners from other countries. From Miller’s hilarious grade school playground battles over wanting to marry another boy to the harrowing travails of being in a bi-national relationship with his Australian lover, Glory Box leads the audience on an intense and humorous journey into the complexity of the human heart that knows no boundary. Glory Box (the term Australians use for “hope chest”) conjures an alternative site for the placing of memories, hopes and dreams of gay people’s extraordinary potential for love.

Tim Miller is an internationally acclaimed performance artist.  Miller’s creative work as a performer and writer explores the artistic, spiritual and political topography of his identity as a gay man. Hailed for his humor and  passion, Miller has tackled this challenge in such pieces as Postwar (1982), Cost of Living (1983), Democracy in America (1984), Buddy Systems (1985), Some Golden States (1987), Stretch Marks (1989), Sex/Love/Stories (1991), My Queer Body (1992), Naked Breath (1994), Fruit Cocktail(1996),  Shirts & Skin (1997), Glory Box (1999), US (2003), 1001 Beds (2006) and Lay of the Land (2009). Miller’s performances have been presented all over North America, Australia, and Europe in such prestigious venues as Yale Repertory Theatre, the Institute of Contemporary Art (London), the Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), and the Brooklyn Academy of Music. He is the author of the books Shirts & SkinBody Blows and 1001 Beds, which won the 2007 Lambda Literary Award for best book in Drama-Theatre. His solo theater works have been published in the play collections O Solo Homo and Sharing the Delirium. Miller’s newest book, 1001 Beds, an anthology of his performances, essays and journals, was published by University of Wisconsin Press in 2006. Miller has taught performance at UCLA, NYU, the School of Theology at Claremont and at universities throughout the United States. He is a co-founder of two of the most influential performance spaces in the United States: Performance Space 122 on Manhattan’s Lower East Side and Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica.

This performance contains mature themes and is not appropriate for children.

$10 students and seniors
$20 general admission
To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

Tickets will be available at the door, cash or check only.


Junot Diaz

Junot Diaz

Wednesday, November 7, 7:30 p.m.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre
Junot Diaz, Creative Writing Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Reading and Discussion of This is How You Lose Her

Co-sponsored by the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Department of Modern Languages, Linguistics and Intercultural Communication, Department of English, the Department of Psychology, the Language, Literacy and Culture Ph.D. program, the Division of Student Affairs, the Dresher Center for the Humanities, Office of Institutional Advancement, the Provost’s Diversity Initiative, and UMBC’s Latino Hispanic Faculty Association

Junot Diaz, Pulitzer Prize winning fiction writer and Creative Writing Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will read from and discuss his new collection of short stories, This is How You Lose Her.

Díaz was born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and is the author of Drown and The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao which won the John Sargent Sr. First Novel Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and the 2008 Pulitzer Prize.


"Faulkner and Hemingway. Biography of a Literary Rivalry" by Joseph Fruscione

“Faulkner and Hemingway. Biography of a Literary Rivalry” by Joseph Fruscione

Monday, November 5
“Faulkner and Hemingway: Overview of a Rivalry”
Joseph Fruscione, Department of English, UMBC and First Year Writing Program, George Washington University
12 Noon, Commons, Room 329

The Department of English

William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway, both winners of the Nobel Prize in Literature, carried on a nuanced and complex literary rivalry. At times, each voiced a shared professional respect; at other times, each thought himself the superior craftsman and spoke disparagingly of the other. Through a sense of competition, though, came an equally strong sense of psychological influence. In this talk, Fruscione will give a kind of overview of their multi-decade relationship, with special emphasis on their correspondence and Faulkner’s late novel, A Fable.


hip hopWednesday, November 7
“Beyond the Phat Beats and Rhymes: Hip Hop, American Society, and the African American Struggle” Trisha Okine ’12, M.A. Public History
4 pm, Administration Building, Room 711

History

This talk is based on the thesis of Trisha Okine ’12, M.A. Public History. She has previously spoken at the State Department last summer on the same topic.


Election 2012 buttonSocial Sciences Forum
Thursday, November 8
Post Election Forum
4 pm, Albin O. Kuhn Library, 7th Floor

What happened in the 2012 Presidential Election, and why? Join experienced political analysts for an informed and engaging discussion about the election – the campaigns, candidates, key issues and voter turnout.

Panelists:
Donald F. Norris, Professor and Chair the Department of Public Policy and Director of the Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research
Thomas F. Schaller, Professor of Political Science and columnist for Salon and The Baltimore Sun
Annie Linskey, state politics and government reporter for The Baltimore Sun

This Social Sciences Forum is sponsored by the Department of Public Policy and Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research

This event is also sponsored by The Baltimore Sun.


studentdance02-sDance
November 9 & 10
Senior Dance Concert
8 pm, Fine Arts Building Studio 317

The Department of Dance presents the Senior Dance Concert.

$12 general admission $7 students and seniors. For information and reservations, call the Dance Box Office at 410-455-6240; order tickets online through MissionTix.


Robert Houston, photographer and For All The World to Hear storyteller.

Robert Houston, photographer and For All The World to Hear storyteller.

Visual Arts
Thursday, November 15
For All the World to Hear: Stories from the Struggle for Civil Rights (preview)
12:00 pm, UMBC Commons, Sports Zone

For All the World to Hear: Stories from the Struggle for Civil Rights (a related piece to For All the World to See) is a spellbinding humanities project in which approximately a dozen senior citizens from the Baltimore area will tell, write, perform and digitally publish personal stories about their involvement with the struggle for civil rights.  A community outreach program of UMBC’s Center for Art Design and Visual Culture, the project brings diverse seniors together for a series of oral history interviews under the guidance of oral historian and producer/artistic director of Heritage Theatre Artists’ Consortium, Harriet Lynn. This preview will be part of the exhibition’s four month tour, November 2012 – Feburary 2013, performing at venues including museums, libraries, parks and college campuses. Click to see the full performance schedule.

For All the World to Hear was organized by Sandra Abbott in collaboration with Harriet Lynn, and in association with UMBC’s New Media Center. Program partners include The Stoop Storytelling Series, Eating Together in Baltimore, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, the Jewish Museum of Maryland, Mosaic Center, UMBC, Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture and the Senior Citizen Division of Baltimore City Recreation and Parks.

Admission to this event is free.

This project was made possible by a grant from the Maryland Humanities Council, through support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or the Maryland Humanities Council.


Ernest C. Withers, I Am A Man, Sanitation Workers Assemble Outside Clayborn Temple, Memphis, TN, 1968 © Ernest C. Withers. Courtesy Panopticon Gallery, Boston, MA

Ernest C. Withers, I Am A Man, Sanitation Workers Assemble Outside Clayborn Temple, Memphis, TN, 1968 © Ernest C. Withers. Courtesy Panopticon Gallery, Boston, MA

Visual Arts
November 15 – March 10
For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights, organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture in partnership with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture and curated by Maurice Berger, is the first comprehensive museum exhibition to explore the historic role played by visual images in shaping, influencing, and transforming the fight for civil rights in the United States. Through a host of media—including photographs, television and film, magazines, newspapers, posters, books, and pamphlets—the project explores fight for racial equality and justice from the late-1940s to the mid-1970s. For All the World to See includes a traveling exhibition, website, online film festival, and richly illustrated companion book.

An opening reception will be held on Thursday, November 15 from 5 to 7:30 pm.

Admission to the exhibition is free. The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and is located in the Fine Arts Building. For more information call 410-455-3188.


1Music
Thursday, November 15
Marc Ponthus, Pianist
8:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents composer and pianist Marc Ponthus, for an evening of contemporary music.

Marc Ponthus, the first solo performer to play concerts entirely of a single composer of the post WW2 era, has spent his career promoting and playing contemporary music. Ponthus is the director/founder of the Institute and Festival for Contemporary Performance at Mannes College New School (now in its eighth year). He was the conductor of the Lower East Side Ensemble, the Project Webern Ensemble and the IFCP Ensemble, has recorded for Neuma Records and Lorelt Records, and composes under the nom de plume Oữτις. Ponthus is a recipient of the Tanne Foundation’s Award for Achievement in the arts.

Ponthus’ program will feature:

  • 12 Notations, Une Page d’Ephéméride, and Incises by Pierre Boulez
  • Fantasy Opus 17 by Robert Schumann
  • Khmer Mirror by Oữτις
  • Klavierstuck X by Karlheinz Stockhausen

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To purchase tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.


camerata01-sMusic
Saturday, November 17
UMBC Camerata with the US Navy Sea Chanters
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The UMBC Camerata will perform a program entitled “With Hope and Thanksgiving” under the direction of Stephen Caracciolo in concert with the United States Navy Sea Chanters.

The program will feature:
Camerata
  • Let Thy Hand be Strengthened by G.F. Handel
  • The Promise of Living by Aaron Copland
  • Brindisi, La Taviata by Giuseppi Verdi

United States Navy Sea Chanters

  • Ever with Me by Gwyneth Walker
  • Animal Crackers, volume 2 by Eric Whitacre
  • Let There Be Peace on Earth arr. by James Turk
  • Drunken Sailor arr. by Robert Sund

Combined Ensembles

  • Denn alles Fleisch, es ist wie Gras, A German Requiem by Johannes Brahms
  • Wayfaring Stranger arr. by Stephen Caracciolo
  • Crossin’ Ovah by Richard Jackson
  • Make Our Garden Grow by Leonard Bernstein
Admission is free.

jazzensemble02-sMusic
Sunday, November 18
UMBC Jazz in Concert
2 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents UMBC Jazz in Concert under the direction of Matthew Belzer.

Admission is free.


symphony03-sMusic
Sunday, November 18
UMBC Symphony
7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of E. Michael Richards.

The program will feature:

  • Slavonic Dances, Op. 46 by Antonin Dvorak
  • Suites 1 & 2 for Small Orchestra by Igor Stravinsky
  • Danzon No. 2 by Arturo Marquez
  • Finale from Symphony No. 3 by Gustav Mahler

Admission is free.


National Museum of African American History & Culture

National Museum of African American History & Culture

Humanities Forum
Wednesday November 28
“Collecting, Preserving and Interpreting African American History and Culture”
4 pm, Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Panelists:
Jacquelyn Serwer, Chief Curator, National Museum of African American History & Culture
Michelle Joan  Wilkinson, Director of Collections and Exhibitions Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland
Moira  Hinderer, Curator, Afro American Newspaper Archive


fp05-sTheatre
Fabulous Presto
November 29 – December 2
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Black Box Theatre

The Department of Theatre presents Fabulous Presto, conceived and directed by Colette SearlsFabulous Presto is theatre for things—a variety show of puppet acts that clash the living human with the dead object, and old-fashioned hocus pocus with futuristic tricks. At turns humorous, uncanny and weird this is an original production where anything goes and every THING wants to come out and to play.

Note: this production is inappropriate for children under 12.

Performances:
Thursday, November 29 | 4:00 p.m. (free performance for the UMBC campus community)
Friday, November 30 | 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, December 1 | 2:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, December 2 | 2:00 p.m.

$10 general admission, $5 for students and seniors.

Reserve tickets for pickup though the Department of Theatre’s website.
To purchase tickets in advance via credit card, order online through MissionTix.


stringfellow01-sVisual Arts
Thursday, November 29 | 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.
Kim Stringfellow, visiting artist lecture
Academic IV – Lecture Hall 4

Kim Stringfellow is an artist/educator whose work and research interests address ecological, historical, and activist issues related to land use and the built environment through hybrid documentary forms incorporating writing, digital media, photography, audio, video, installation, mapping, and locative media. She is an associate professor at the School of Art, Design, and Art History at San Diego State University. Stringfellow’s projects have been commissioned and funded by leading organizations including the Creative Work Fund, Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, Seattle Arts Commission, and the California Council for the Humanities. Stringfellow is the author of two photographic books includingJackrabbit Homestead: Tracing the Small Tract Act in the Southern California Landscape, 1938–2008 (2009) and Greetings from the Salton Sea: Folly and Intervention in the Southern California Landscape, 1905-2005(2005). Both books were published by the Center for American Places.

Admission is free.


think_create_engage_red1Music
Thursday, November 29
An Evening of Trios
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents an Evening of Trios, featuring works by Lennox Berkeley, György Ligeti and Johannes Brahms, performed by Kristin Jurkscheit (horn), Airi Yoshioka (violin) and Audrey Andrist (piano).

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with UMBC ID. To purchase tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.


music01-sMusic
Friday, November 30
UMBC Collegium Musicum
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the Collegium Musicum under the direction of Joseph C. Morin. The Collegium Musicum is a performance ensemble dedicated to exploring and performing vocal and instrumental music from the European Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods, sampling musical repertoires created between 800 and 1750.

Admission is free.

think_create_engage_redMusic
Saturday, December 1
Jubilee Singers
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the Jubilee Singers (followed immediately by the UMBC Gospel Choir) under the direction of Janice Jackson.

Admission is free, donations accepted.


music01-sMusic
Wednesday, December 5
UMBC Chamber players and New Music Ensemble
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Chamber Players under the direction of Airi Yoshioka and the New Music Ensemble under the direction of Lisa Cella.

Admission is free.


Julian Bond, Civil Rights Leader

Julian Bond, Civil Rights Leader

Humanities Forum
Wednesday, December 5
“The Civil Rights Movement from the  Ground Up”
4 pm, Performing Arts & Humanities Building Theatre

Panelists:
Freeman Hrabowski, President, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Julian Bond, Civil Rights Leader and Former Chairman, NAACP
Andrew B. Lewis, Author of The Shadows of Youth: The Remarkable Journey of the Civil Rights Generation
Moderator:
Taylor Branch, Author and Historian

Humanities Forum

Learn about the unsung young men and women who were at the forefront of the civil rights movement, in particular those in SNCC, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, which grew out of the 1960 sit ins by African-American college students. Julian Bond, one of the founders of SNCC and later chairman of the NAACP, Andrew Lewis, the author of The Shadows of Youth: The Story of the Civil Rights Generation, and UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski, who participated in the Birmingham Children’s March of 1963, will discuss the crucial–often underappreciated–role youth and college students played in the movement. Moderated by Taylor Branch.

This event is held in conjunction with For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights.  For more information about the exhibition and related programming, please click here.


sidebar_percussionMusic
Thursday, December 6
UMBC Percussion Ensemble
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Percussion Ensemble under the direction of Tom Goldstein. The UMBC Percussion Ensemble is a dedicated performing group of advanced percussion students. The ensemble is adventurous in its programming, with a repertoire that includes graphic-notation pieces, improvisational works, and theatre, as well as works by important early percussion composers, such as Alan Hovhaness, John Cage, and Carlos Chavez. The Ensemble has established a tradition of performing works by UMBC’s faculty and student composers, who sometimes include members of the ensemble.

Admission is free.


lisaleap01-sDance
December 6 – 8
Fall Dance Showcase
8 pm, Old Theatre (Theatre by The Commons)

The Department of Dance presents the annual Fall Dance Showcase.

$12 general admission $7 students and seniors. For information and reservations, call the Dance Box Office at 410-455-6240; order tickets online through MissionTix.


camerata01-sMusic
Saturday, December 8
UMBC Camerata
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Camerata under the direction of Stephen Caracciolo. The Camerata is a select chamber choir of 35-45 singers that performs great choral literature in a variety of styles, from Renaissance motets to avant-garde contemporary works.

The Camerata will perform a program entitled “Choruses and Carols” featuring:

  • Let Thy Hand be Strengthened by G.F. Handel
  • Denn alles Fleisch, es ist wie Gras, A German Requiem by Johannes Brahms
  • Brindisi, La Traviata by Giuseppi Verdi
  • The Promise of Living, The Tenderland by Aaron Copland
  • Make Our Garden Grow, Candide by Leonard Bernstein
  • Wayfaring Stranger arr. by Stephen Caracciolo
  • Crossin’ Ovah by Richard Jackson
  • Carol of the Bells by Mykola Leontovych
  • Hush, My Dear Lie Still and Slumber by Stephen Caracciolo
  • Wassail Song arr. by Vaughn Williams
  • Angels We Have Heard on High arr. by Alice Parker

ensemble_vocalartsOpera Workshop

The Department of Music presents the Opera Workshop under the direction of Joseph Regan. The Opera Workshop is a course designed for 8 – 15 advanced vocalists, and offers students the opportunity to study stage acting, movement and character development within the sphere of musical performance.

Admission is free.


windensemble2Music
Monday, December 10
UMBC Wind Ensemble
8pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

The UMBC Wind Ensemble, under the direction of Richard Spece, will perform a special program featuring a multi-disciplinary piece, A Symphony of Fables, in conjunction with art and animation created by students of Introduction to Animation, taught by Lynn Tomlinson.

A Symphony of Fables is made up of five programmatic movements, each rooted in a different fable –”The Lion and the Mouse”, “The Pied Piper of Hamelin”, “The Tortoise and the Hare”, “The Ugly Duckling” and “The Three Billy Goats Gruff”– which will be accompanied by visual interpretations, created by the students, projected onto a screen directly behind the musicians. The artworks are original pieces with styles adapted to convey the tone and timbre of the music, and highlight the students’ progress throughout the semester.

Admission to this event is free.


camerata01-sMusic
Tuesday, December 11
UMBC Camerata: Carols for The Season
1:45 pm, UMBC Commons, Mainstreet

The UMBC Camerata revisits a portion of it’s most recent performance, “Choruses and Carols”, for a holiday themed, afternoon concert entitled “Carols for The Season” under the direction of Dr. Stephen Caracciolo.

The program will feature:

  • Carol of The Bells by Mykola Leontovych
  • Hush, My Dear Lie Still And Slumber by Stephen Caracciolo
  • Wassail Song arranged by Ralph Vaughn Williams
  • Angels We Have Heard on High arranged by Alice Parker

The Camerata is a select choir of 40-50 singers drawn from all majors of the university, Camerata performs a wide variety of works drawn from the expansive choral repertoire: including Renaissance motets, folksongs, choral-orchestral works, German part songs, Russian sacred liturgies, American spirituals, and new works. In previous seasons Camerata has accepted invitations to perform with conductor-composer John Rutter at Carnegie Hall, and provide entertainment for guests touring the White House during the holiday season.

Admission to this performance is free.

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