Fall 2013

uncult10.07.22_2084Visual Arts
Thursday, September 5 – Saturday, October 5
Spectrum: 2013 UMBC Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture presentsSpectrum, a visual arts faculty exhibition organized by the CADVC and featuring work by six faculty from UMBC’s Department of Visual Arts: Kelley Bell, Lynn Cazabon, Viviana Cordova, Neal McDonald, Lisa Moren and John Sturgeon. Spectrum will highlight work from a range of disciplines including photography, printmaking, graphic design, film, video, sculpture and computer animation.

Faculty Lectures:

  • Monday, September 9,  John Sturgeon
  • Wednesday, September 18, Lynn Cazabon
  • Monday, September 23, Viviana Cordova
  • Wednesday, September 25, Kelley Bell
  • Wednesday , October 2, Lisa Moren

Kelley Bell, assistant professor of Visual Arts, incorporates animation, illustration and many other visual media in her graphic design practice. Since beginning her career as a freelance artist in New York City, Bell has created work for a number of diverse clients, established an independent graphic design studio, KBell Design, and her animations have appeared throughout Baltimore and have been screened as far away as Berlin, Germany. Focused on print media for non-profit organizations in the Baltimore-Washington region, Bell has designed pieces for Wide Angle Media, the Creative Alliance at the Patterson, the Enoch Pratt Free Library and the Maryland State Teacher’s Association.

Lynn Cazabon, associate chair and associate professor of Visual Arts, utilizes photography, web and mobile device platforms, video and installation. Her work seeks to understand the nature of human progress by looking at what is left behind in its wake. Cazabon’s recent project, Uncultivated, examines wild plants within the urban environment as a means to reveal the unintended consequences of human activity upon the land. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally in museums and galleries for the past 20 years, and is part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Viviana Cordova, assistant professor of Visual Arts, is a researcher, graphic designer and artist. Her work has been featured in the books Indie Publishing (2008) and Graphic Design: The New Basics (2008). Her motion design work has been aired on Telemundo and BET, she has done print and web design for a range of clients including the National Institutes of Health, The Source magazine and John Hopkins University, and her work has been exhibited as far away as Seoul, Korea. Cordova is the co-author of Type and Code: Processing for Designers (2009). A sampling of her work can be viewed at her website www.webtypography.org.

Neal McDonald, assistant professor of Visual Arts, is an artist, animator and game and app developer whose work explores the ways that art exists (and is forced to exist) in America. His recent collaborative work with Lynn Cazabon, Junkspace, is a time and location sensitive animation and corresponding mobile application that dynamically visualizes space debris tracking data. The installation has been exhibited internationally, and is available as a free iPhone app.

Lisa Moren is a professor of Visual Arts. Her site-derived work has been presented nationally and internationally, and explores domestic spaces from interior rituals to the exterior community. She intersects new media of video, audio, sensors, motors and interactivity, with drawing, prints, casting, wax and installation. Moren has published intermedia research in her curatorial books Command Z: Artists Working with Phenomena & Technology, and Intermedia: The Dick Higgins Collection, in Performance Research, Darlington, England, and in Visible Language, Providence, Rhode Island and Inter Art Actual, Montreal.

John Sturgeon, professor of Visual Arts, is a digital media artist-poet, practicing in video, installation, performance, and interactive forms, with interests in tele-performative and streaming media collaborations. Since the early 1970s, Sturgeon has consistently utilized emerging forms of electronic media to articulate a quest for a spiritual persona. Sturgeon has exhibited and performed extensively both nationally and internationally, including solo commissions for the Museum of Modern Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and a retrospective at ICA-Boston. Notable video screenings include the Whitney Biennial and broadcasts on PBS. His artwork is represented in the collections of major museums worldwide.

A free opening reception for this exhibition will be held Thursday, September 5 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Admission to the exhibition is free. The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and is located in the Fine Arts Building. For more information call 410-455-3188.

Moren_marble1Images: Top: photograph from Uncultivated, Lynn Cazabon; above: four 22″x30″ marbelized papers made from 2010 BP oil spill, Lisa Moren.


Screen Shot 2013-08-06 at 10.59.28 AMAsian Studies
Friday, September 6 | 7:00 p.m.
Hindi Yakshagana, “Panchavati: The Story of Surpanakha”
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The UMBC Department of Asian Studies presents the dance troupe Yaksha Manjusha performing “Panchavati: The Story of Surpanakha.” “Panchavati” is a dazzling Hindi Yakshanga, a stage drama that depicts Indian epics through song, dance and dialogue. Yakshagana is a musical theatre art popular in the costal regions of Karnataka, and consists of two parts: a himmela, or background music group, and a mummela, a dance and dialogue group in colorful costumes.

Yaksha Manjusha is based in Mangalore, and is the only Yakshanga troupe to perform in Hindi. Enrolled with the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR), they have performed in over nineteen states in India.

This event is open to all ages, and will be performed with English subtitles. Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. To purchase tickets in advance, call 410-455-2094 or email the Department of Asian Studies at asianstudies@umbc.edu.

A flyer for this event is available here.

This event is co-sponsored by the Departments of Theatre, Dance and Music, and the Dean of the College of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences. All profits from this event will support Asian Studies students’ study abroad.


faculty_exhibVisual Arts
Monday September 9 | 12 Noon
Spectrum Faculty Lecture: John Sturgeon
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

John Sturgeon, professor of visual arts, is a digital media artist-poet, practicing in video, installation, performance, and interactive forms, with interests in tele-performative and streaming media collaborations. Since the early 1970s, Sturgeon has consistently utilized emerging forms of electronic media to articulate a quest for a spiritual persona. Sturgeon has exhibited and performed extensively both nationally and internationally, including solo commissions for the Museum of Modern Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and a retrospective at ICA-Boston. Notable video screenings include the Whitney Biennial and broadcasts on PBS. His artwork is represented in the collections of major museums worldwide.

This talk is part of a series of artist lectures accompanying the exhibition, Spectrum: 2013 UMBC Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition.


Author-photo-5Humanities Forum
Tuesday, September 10 | 4:00 p.m.
“Hispanic Americans: The Cosmic Race,” Marie Arana, Writer and Literary Editor
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This Humanities Forum lecture is sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities and the Latino Hispanic Family Association.

Throughout her career as a writer, Marie Arana has aimed to explain who Hispanic Americans are and what it means to have a north-south American identity. In this talk, she will explore questions of Latin American identity, its links to history, its extraordinary diversity, and the singular lessons she learned while writing her biography of Simón Bolívar.

Arana is the author of a prize-winning memoir American Chica: Two Worlds, One Childhood, the novels Cellophane and Lima Nights, and the biography Bolívar: American Liberator. She was the literary editor of The Washington Post for many years, as well as a writer for the PostThe New York TimesThe International Herald Tribune, and numerous other publications around the world.

The talk will be preceded by a reception and book sale, 2:30-3:45, and followed by questions and discussion.


Damaged_SpringVisual Arts
Monday, September 16 – Monday, December 16
Druckworks: 40 Years of Books and Projects by Johanna Drucker
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Artist, writer, typographic poet and scholar-critic Johanna Drucker is widely known for her contributions to contemporary art theory and history, as well as her prolific output as a creative artist. Throughout her career she has helped shape the field of artists’ books, visual poetics, and digital aesthetics in dialogue with the arts and critical issues. Druckworks, a retrospective exhibition, is the first comprehensive presentation of Drucker’s books, graphic art and visual projects, and reveals key insights into the artist’s development over the course of four decades.

Drucker is an author, book artist, visual theorist, and cultural critic. Her scholarly writing documents and critiques visual language: letterforms, typography, visual poetry, art and, lately, digital aesthetics. Drucker is internationally renowned for her book art, which touches on a variety of themes, especially “the exploration of the conventions of narrative prose and the devices by which it orders, sequences, and manipulates events according to its own logic” as well as “the use of experimental typography to expand the possibilities of prose beyond the linear format of traditional presentation.”

Her work has been exhibited at universities, libraries, galleries, and museums throughout the world, including Museum of Arts and Design, Cooper-Hewitt Museum, National Museum of Women in the Arts, New York Public Library, Yale University, Columbia University, Harvard University, Art Institute of Chicago, University of the Arts (Philadelphia), and Parsons School of Design.

Drucker is currently the Martin and Bernard Breslauer Professor in the Department of Information Studies at the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at UCLA.

The Gallery is open Monday through Friday, 10 am to 5 pm, on Thursday until 8 pm, and Saturday and Sunday 1 – 5 pm.  Admission is free. For more information call 410-455-2270.

Image: Johanna Drucker, Damaged Spring, 2003, laser print, collage, and linoleum cuts, case bound in paper covered boards, Druckwerk, 40 copies.


By Daniel Mellis and April Sheridan

Visual Arts
Monday, September 16 – Sunday, December 15
Vista Sans Wood Type Project
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The Vista Sans Wood Type Project, organized by artists Tricia Treacy and Ashley John Pigford, features letterpress prints by more than twenty artists and presses, often collaboratively made.

This exhibition presents 32 letterpress prints produced by a group of international artists as part of the Vista Sans Wood Type Project, a collaborative experimental type and print project in which modern technology blends with a historic printing process to produce a hybrid form of typographic design. The resulting artworks offer diverse reflections on the post-digital and multidisciplinary nature of contemporary artistic practice.

Inspired by their interest in the intersection of old and new media, Treacy and Pigford used a Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) router to create traditional wood type of the digital typeface Vista Sans, designed by Xavier Dupré for Emigré. Five letters, t-o-u-c-h, were sent to the various participants, along with a set of paper. These basic elements and the medium of letterpress printing are the shared factors among the prints. The resulting portfolio shows the wide variety of work being produced by letterpress in the contemporary book arts world. The exhibition features the prints in the Vista Sans Wood Type Project portfolio, and one set of the actual wood type.

Participating Artists: Megan Adie (Basel, Switzerland)Katie Baldwin (Aurora, New York)Baltimore Print Studios (Baltimore, Maryland)Inge Bruggman (Chicago, Illinois)Macy Chadwick (Oakland, California), Angela Driscoll & Yuka Petz (New Orleans, Louisiana)Firecracker Press (St. Louis, Misouri)Rose Gridneff & Alex Cooper (London, England)Rick Griffith (Denver, Colorado)Bethany Heck (Baltimore,Maryland)Dafi Kuhne (Zurich, Switzerland)Josephine McCormick (Belfast, Ireland)Robin McDowell (New Hampshire)Peter Kruty & Sayre Gaydos (New York)Ben Levits & Sam Michaels (Minnesota)Ashley John Pigford (Newark, Delaware)April Sheridan & Daniel Mellis (Chicago, Illinois)Nick Sherman (New York, New York)David Shields (Austin, Texas)Tricia Treacy (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)David Wolske (Salt Lake City, Utah)Karen Zimmerman (Tucson, Arizona).

The presentation of this exhibition is supported by an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.  Additional support comes from the Friends of the Library & Gallery and the Libby Kuhn Endowment Fund, as well as individual contributions.

Image by Daniel Mellis and April Sheridan.


Luz Rivera MartinezSocial Sciences Forum
Monday, September 16 | 5:00 p.m.
“Sowing Struggle: Social Movements and the Future of Corn in Tlaxcala Mexico,” Luz Rivera Martinez, Co-founder, Consejo Nacional Urbano Campesino
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This Social Science Forum is co-sponsored with the Departments of Geography and Environmental Systems, Political Science, American Studies, Modern Languages, Linguistics & Intercultural Communication, Gender and Women’s Studies Program, Global Studies Program, the Women’s Center, the Shriver Center, and the Honors College.

Luz Rivera Martinez, co-founder and lead organizer of Consejo Nacional Urbano Campesino (CNUC), an organization that advocates for and accompanies peasant workers, a bus drivers’ cooperative and the National Assembly of Braceros in their struggles against government corruption, police repression and neoliberalism.

Luz will speak about her 20 years of experience in women’s, peasant and labor movements. As CNUC’s lead organizer, Luz has worked tirelessly to demand government accountability, defend family farms, resist the use of GMO seeds, and build inspiring, community-based autonomous projects.


prattSocial Sciences Forum
Tuesday, September 17 | 4:00 p.m.
“Constitutional Principles and The Double Bind of Affirmative Action,” Carla Pratt, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, Penn State University, Dickinson School of Law
Albin O. Kuhn Library, 7th floor

This Social Sciences Forum is the Constitution Day Lecture, co-sponsored with the Departments of Political Science, Africana Studies, Public Policy, and the Office of Student Life.

Professor Pratt will discuss the role of constitutional principles in legal arguments for and against race conscious admissions policies in higher education, and the ways in which such arguments reflect insufficient allusions to and underspecified notions of governmental and societal interests. She will also discuss the June 2013 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Fisher vs. University of Texas, a case challenging the consideration of race in college admissions, and the potential implications of the decision for debates about equal protection and diversity


spectrumVisual Arts
Wednesday, September 18 | 12 Noon
Spectrum Faculty Lecture: Lynn Cazabon
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

Lynn Cazabon, associate chair and associate professor of Visual Arts, utilizes photography, web and mobile device platforms, video and installation. Her work seeks to understand the nature of human progress by looking at what is left behind in its wake. Cazabon’s recent project, Uncultivated, examines wild plants within the urban environment as a means to reveal the unintended consequences of human activity upon the land. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally in museums and galleries for the past 20 years, and is part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Also on view in the exhibition is Cazabon’s collaborative project with Neal McDonald, Junkspace, a site specific animation and iOS app which juxtaposes electronic waste and orbital debris and selections from Immigrant Landscapes, a collaborative project with Patterson Clark.

This talk is part of a series of artist lectures accompanying the exhibition Spectrum: 2013 UMBC Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition.

Image: Photograph from Uncultivated, Lynn Cazabon


50276_128048226803_2378936_nHumanities Forum
Thursday, September 19 | 4:30 p.m.
“What Remains? Baltimore Neighborhoods in Transition,” Panel Discussion Moderated by Denise Meringolo, History
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This Humanities Forum is sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities, with additional support from the Department of American Studies.

In this age of industrial decline, what happens to communities and places that once thrived?

Moderator: Denise Meringolo, associate professor of History at UMBC, teaches courses in public history and in American social and cultural history, particularly during the Progressive era, the 1920s and the 1930s. Her research explores the significance and value of American cultural institutions, and her book, Museums, Monuments, and National Parks: Toward a New Genealogy of Public History (University of Massachusetts, 2012), explores the federal government’s efforts to collect and preserve the nation’s cultural resources, and argues that public history has always been multidisciplinary, service-oriented, and educational.

Participants include: Deborah Rudacille, journalist, Department of English; Nicole King, assistant professor of American studies; Steve Bradley, associate professor of Visual Arts; Bill Shewbridge, director of UMBC’s New Media Studio; Michelle Stefano, Department of American Studies and Maryland Traditions; Eddie Bartee, Jr., a former Sparrows Point steelworker; and Jason Reed, a community gardener of the Curtis Bay neighborhood in Baltimore.

george_garzone_06_brescia2008


Music
Friday, September 20 | 8:00 p.m.
The Tom Lagana Group Featuring Guest Performer George Garzone
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the Tom Lagana Group in concert with special guest artist George Garzone.

Tom Lagana Group features UMBC affiliate artist Tom Lagana, “whose playing displays fluid fingering up and down the fretboard, bobbing between subtle and fervor, engaging the listener by setting life’s musings to organic compositions.”

Special guest and saxophonist George Garzone is well-known as a sought-after jazz educator, currently teaching at the Berklee College of Music.  He has also previously taught at New England Conservatory, Longy School of Music, New York University, Manhattan School of Music, Northeastern University and the New School University. He has pioneered the triadic chromatic approach and students of his have included Joshua Redman, Branford Marsalis, Teadross Avery, Luciana Souza, Mark Turner, Donny McCaslin, Doug Yates and Danilo Perez, among many others.

Garzone is a member of The Fringe, a jazz trio founded in 1972 that includes bassist John Lockwood and drummer Bob Gullotti, that performs regularly in the Boston area and has toured Portugal. The group has released three albums. A veteran jazzman, Garzone has appeared on more than 20 recordings.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance with a credit card, purchase online through MissionTix.


bookCOVERWTNEWVisual Arts
Monday, September 23 | 12 Noon
Spectrum Faculty Lecture: Viviana Cordova
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

Viviana Cordova, assistant professor of Visual Arts, is a researcher, graphic designer and artist. Her work has been featured in the books Indie Publishing (2008) and Graphic Design: The New Basics (2008). Her motion design work has been aired on Telemundo and BET, and she has created print and web design for a range of clients, including the National Institutes of Health, The Source magazine and The John Hopkins University, and her work has been exhibited as far as Seoul, Korea. Cordova is the co-author of Type and Code: Processing for Designers (2009). A sampling of her work and information about her book, Web Typography: A Handbook for Graphic Designers, can be viewed at her website, www.webtypography.org.

This talk is one in a series of artist lectures accompanying the exhibition, Spectrum: 2013 UMBC Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition.


Jasanoff2013Humanities Forum
Tuesday, September 24 | 4:00 p.m.
“The Worlds of Joseph Conrad: British Imperial Decline and the Dawn of Globalization,” Maya Jasanoff, Professor of History, Harvard University
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This Humanities Forum is the annual Robert K. Webb History Department Lecture. It is sponsored by UMBC’s Department of History and co-sponsored with the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

Prize-winning historian and educator Maya Jasanoff lectures on “The Worlds of Joseph Conrad: British Imperial Decline and the Dawn of Globalization.” She uses Conrad’s life and fiction (including Heart of Darkness) to provide a transcontinental history of the world c. 1900.

Maya Jasanoff’s teaching and research focus on the history of modern Britain and the British Empire. Her first book, Edge of Empire: Lives, Culture, and Conquest in the East, 1750-1850, investigates British expansion in India and Egypt through the lives of art collectors. It was awarded the 2005 Duff Cooper Prize and was a book of the year selection in numerous publications including The EconomistThe Observer, and The Sunday Times. Her 2011 book, Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World, provides the first global history of the loyalists who fled the United States after the American Revolution, and resettled in Canada, the Caribbean, Britain, Sierra Leone, and beyond.Liberty’s Exiles won numerous distinctions including the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award for Non-Fiction, the George Washington Book Prize, and a Recognition of Excellence from the Cundill Prize in History; it was also shortlisted for the BBC Samuel Johnson Prize. Her essays and reviews regularly appear in publications including the The New York Review of BooksThe Guardian, and The New Republic.


Screen Shot 2013-09-04 at 2.19.59 PMVisual Arts
Wednesday, September 25 | 12 Noon
Spectrum Faculty Lecture: Kelley Bell
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

Kelley Bell, assistant professor of Visual Arts, incorporates animation, illustration and many other visual media in her graphic design practice. Since beginning her career as a freelance artist in New York City, Bell has created work for a number of diverse clients, established an independent graphic design studio, KBell Design, and her animations have appeared throughout Baltimore and have been screened as far Berlin, Germany. Focused on print media for non-profit organizations in the Baltimore-Washington region, Bell has designed pieces for Wide Angle Media, The Creative Alliance at the Patterson, the Enoch Pratt Free Library and the Maryland State Teacher’s Association.

This talk is part of a series of artist lectures accompanying the exhibition, Spectrum: 2013 UMBC Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition.


PlanetsFruit-Shadows-WIDEVisual Arts
Wednesday, September 25 | 7:00 p.m. 
Joel Katz, Visiting Artist Lecture
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Artist and designer Joel Katz speaks about his experience in information design.

Joel Katz — designer, photographer, and teacher — is internationally known for his information design. Diagrams of complex statistical data and processes are a passionate interest and characterize his work on Brand Atlas: Branding Intelligence Made Visible, co-authored with Alina Wheeler (John Wiley & Sons, 2011). His book Designing Information: Human Factors and Common Sense was published by Wiley in 2012.
Katz holds BA Scholar of the House with Exceptional Distinction, and BFA and MFA in graphic design from Yale. In 2002, he won the Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome. Also, in 2002, he was named AIGA Philadelphia Fellow.

He currently teaches information design at The University of the Arts and Philadelphia University. His most recent lectures on information design were at Louisiana State University, Kent State University, TélécomParisTech, and Gobelins: l’Ecole de l’Image.

Katz’s photography has been exhibited and published in both the U.S. and abroad, and his design work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, New York, and the Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo and Kyoto. He was made an honorary life member of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association for his work visualizing the function of infants’ kidneys.


DeJesusHumanities Forum
Thursday, September 26 | 4:00 p.m.
“Electric Orisha: Race, Media and Travel in Transnational Santeria,” Aisha M. Beliso-DeJesus, Assistant Professor of African American Religions, Harvard Divinity School
University Center, Room 310

Africana Studies Research Colloquium

This Humanities Forum is sponsored by the Africana Studies Department and co-sponsored with the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

Dr. Aisha M. Beliso-DeJesus is a cultural and social anthropologist and Assistant Professor of African American Religions at the Harvard Divinity School. Drawing from nearly a decade of multi-sited ethnographic field research with Santeria practitioners in Cuba, Florida, California, and New York, Dr. Beliso-DeJesus will discuss the recording of Santeria practice and its use in creating multi-lateral transnational linkages. She will also discuss the emergence of religious travel/cosmopolitanisms as reconfigured and uneven notions of mobility.


cella01-sMusic
Thursday, September 26 | 8:00 p.m.
Lisa Cella, flute
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Join Lisa Cella for the premiere of DUDK*=*FLOT by Gleb Kanasevich and the epic A Liturgy of the Hours by Stuart Saunders Smith.

As a champion of contemporary music, Lisa Cella has performed throughout the United States and abroad. Cella, associate professor of Music at UMBC, is a founding member of UMBC’s faculty contemporary music ensemble, Ruckus. She is a founding member of C2 (flute and cello) and inHale (flute duo). She is artistic director of the SoundON Festival of Modern Music and a founding member of its resident ensemble NOISE.  She is also on the faculty of the Soundscape Summer Festival of Contemporary Music in Maccagno, Italy.


Screen Shot 2013-09-10 at 11.55.58 AMVisual Arts
Monday, September 30 | 6:00 p.m.
TEDxBaltimore: The Artist Journey
Room 306, Fine Arts Building

What journey are you on? Get a “behind the scenes” look into the journeys of young artists’ roads to success: Ty Pleas (photography), Lindsay Dransfield (photography), and Gel Jamlang (illustrator). They will share their unique narratives. By offering insight on overcoming hardship, by revealing secrets to stay artistically motivated and by giving away the recipe to a balanced artistic life, they offer a glimpse of an artist’s most valuable work: the personal roadmap to a dream.

Lindsay Anne Dransfield is a 21-year-old photographer and entrepreneur from Ellicott City. She specializes in lifestyle and wedding photography; ordinary magic is her favorite subject to capture. Her work captures people in wistfully simple, passionate and beautiful moments throughout ordinary and extraordinary days. Shortly after becoming obsessed with the art of making photos, she founded her photography business in 2010 and then continued on to study photography at Howard Community College and UMBC. Her other jobs include working for churches doing media and communications, as well as business-storming with her boyfriend, Tom.

Gel Jamlang is a Filipino visual artist living in Baltimore. She studied at the University of the Philippines College of Fine Arts. Gel worked for 12 years in the Philippine industry of home design and construction, painting murals and furniture. She simultaneously painted large-scale oil and acrylic paintings. Shortly after exhibiting in New York at the Philippine Consulate, Gel moved to Baltimore and focused on drawing and painting, experimenting with watercolor. On November 2012, she won RAW Baltimore’s Visual Artist of the Year award and represented the city in the national competition. December 2012, Jamlang won the national title of RAW Visual Artist of the Year 2012. Jamlang’s work has been featured in Artslant, Juxtapoz, Orion Magazine (Spain), QI Post (China). She also participated as an illustrator for Rock en Seine 2013 in Paris. Jamlang recently won a Denik notebook cover design competition with her piece titled, “Brainstorm”.

Ty Pleas is a freelance fashion and glamour photographer from Norfolk, Virginia. While Pleas mainly photographs and processes digitally, he equally appreciates monochrome film photography. With the decline of the economy in 2010, and employment opportunities at an all time low, Pleas searched for another stream of income. He decided that if he were to take on a business, it would be something that he loved. He took to photography and never looked back. He began his photography business in March 2010. He is self taught, but since opening his business, he has enrolled in some photography courses to enhance his skills. Since opening his business in 2010, he has photographed everything from weddings to working with some of New York most prestigious modeling agencies.

Presented by TEDxBaltimore.


Moren_marble2Visual Arts
Wednesday, October 2 | 12 Noon
Spectrum Faculty Lecture: Lisa Moren
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

Lisa Moren is a professor of visual arts. Her site-derived work has been presented nationally and internationally, and explores domestic spaces from interior rituals to the exterior community. She intersects new media of video, audio, sensors, motors and interactivity, with drawing, prints, casting, wax and installation. Moren has published intermedia research in her curatorial books Command Z: Artists working with Phenomena & Technology, and Intermedia: The Dick Higgins Collection, in Performance Research, Darlington, England, and inVisible Language, Providence, Rhode Island and Inter Art Actual, Montreal.

This talk is part of a series of artist lectures accompanying the exhibition, Spectrum: 2013 UMBC Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition.


cha_storySocial Sciences Forum
Wednesday, October 9 | 7:00 p.m.
“The Pivot to Asia in Obama’s Second Term,” Victor Cha, senior adviser and Korea chair to the Center for Strategic and International Affairs, Professor and Director of Asian studies, holding the D.S. Song-KF Chair in the Department of Government and School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This Social Sciences Forum is co-sponsored with the Asian Studies Program.

Dr. Victor Cha will discuss the origins of the pivot in President Obama’s first term, the implications of China’s rise and regional relation including Japan and Korea. He will also discuss the prospects of the pivot in President Obama’s second term.


Poetry-Slam_Square-300x268Humanities, English
Friday, October 11 | 6:00 p.m.
Big Prize Poetry SLAM!
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Atrium

Slam big and win big at the second annual Poetry Slam hosted by the English Department.

A first prize of $200 will go to the winner of this dazzling, high-energy slam — second and third place prizes will also be awarded — for sharing original work (judged by students, alumni, faculty and staff). Last year’s slam was a standing-room-only success; preregistration for entrance into the contest is required. To participate in the slam, submit a print and video version of no more than five minutes of original poetry to HomecomingSlam@gmail.com by September 17. Entries will be judged on their poetic effects, compelling content and on video performance.

All UMBC students and alumni are eligible.


CKMA_Chanson_byBrianneBland04Dance
Friday, October 11 | 8:00 p.m.
Christopher K. Morgan & Artists
Old Theatre

BUY TICKETS

The innovative contemporary dance company, Chistopher K. Morgan & Artists (CKM&A), performs a program entitled, Places I’ve Been, an evening of mixed repertoire by Christopher K. Morgan & Artists. Places I’ve Been features the company’s recent premiere, Place Names, which explores how names, language and labels can shape one’s identity; Selling Out, said to be “simultaneously amusing and chilling”  by The Washington Post; audience favorite C’est le ton qui fait la chanson; and For Becky, Morgan’s poetic and poignant solo tribute to UMBC graduate Rebecca Jung (1965-2011).

“Morgan displays a keen intellectual curiosity… Clearly the dancers trust one another and the material.”
Susan K. Galbraith, The Washington Post

Christopher K. Morgan & Artists is a professional contemporary dance company founded in July 2011, as a vehicle for Morgan’s choreographic exploration of social and cultural issues. In residence at American Dance Institute in Rockville, MD, and The Alden in McLean, VA, the company provides a creative outlet for its artists through virtuosic and expressive dance performances that give audiences an opportunity for self-reflection. CKM&A works to demystify contemporary dance through community dialogue and online video content. The company also provides professional and pre-professional educational opportunities and facilitation to professional artists.

$15 general admission, $10 students and seniors. To purchase tickets in advance or by credit card, order online through MissionTix.


jazzensemble02-sMusic
Sunday, October 13 | 3:00 p.m.
UMBC Jazz Ensemble
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Jazz Ensemble under the direction of Matthew Belzer.

Admission is free, suggested donation $15. (Funds raised through ticket sales for this event will be administered by the UMBC Foundation for the benefit of UMBC.)


01-cuppetelli-mendozaVisual Arts
Wednesday, October 16 | 4:00 p.m.
Annica Cuppetelli & Cristobal Mendoza, Visiting Artist Lecture
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Annica Cuppetelli (USA) and Cristobal Mendoza(Venezuela) began their artistic collaboration in September 2010. Their practice centers around the creation of site-specific, multimedia installations that address issues of space, interaction and materiality. Their work has been exhibited in the Denver Art Museum, and in various galleries and festivals in the United States, France, Chile, Brazil, with upcoming exhibitions in Canada and Germany. Cuppetelli obtained her MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art (Fibers, 2008) and Mendoza at the Rhode Island School of Design (Digital Media, 2007). Mendoza is an Assistant Professor at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, where they are based.

Image: Transposition, 2013, Annica Cuppetelli and Cristobal Mendoza. Sound composition by Peter Segerstrom. Denver Art Museum, March – September 2013.


Mark_Hertsgaard1Social Sciences Forum, Humanities Forum
Wednesday, October 16 | 7:00 p.m.
“HOT: Living Through the Next 50 Years on Earth,” Mark Hertsgaard, fellow of the New America Foundation, environment correspondent for The Nation, and co-founder of Climate Parents
University Center Ballroom

This Social Sciences Forum is the First Year Book Experience Lecture, co-sponsored by the Office of Undergraduate Education and the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

For twenty years, Mark Hertsgaard has written about global warming for outlets including the New YorkerVanity FairTime, NPR, the BBC and The Nation. Drawing on reporting from around the world, “HOT” is a call to action that injects hope and solutions into a debate characterized by doom and gloom and offers a blueprint for how all of us can navigate an unavoidable new era.


tiemannbelzermusicMusic
Thursday, October 17 | 8:00 p.m.
Tiemann – Belzer: 100 Songs, 20 Seconds Each, Drums and Saxophone
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Tiemann – Belzer — featuring saxophonist Matthew Belzer, director of jazz studies, and drummer Scott Tiemann, adjunct faculty, of the UMBC Department of Music — present a concert of original works influenced by the history of jazz.

“The best sax-drums duet record I’ve ever heard. Okay, I’ve only heard two, but the other one was by John Coltrane, so it’s no faint praise to say this one’s better.”
– David Bertrand Wilson (Wilson and Alroy’s Record Reviews)

Tiemann-Belzer is an unusual jazz ensemble. By boiling down a more traditional instrumentation to only the melodic and rhythmic placeholders, the group creates a distinctive sound. Equally important to what is played is all that is left unplayed. The result is a disciplined and creative approach to performance. Their projects are a completely collaborative effort only possible with musicians who have developed that heightened awareness of each other for which jazz musicians strive.

This performance is the culmination of a years long process. After noticing that their compositions were tending toward increasing brevity, the duo gave themselves the task are creating ten albums comprised of ten tracks. Each track is limited to approximately twenty seconds or less. The result is one hundred tracks spanning the history of jazz, metal, funk, science fiction, cruise ship music and none of the above. In this upcoming concert, audience members will have a brand new, fun-filled, listening experience.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.


1Visual Arts
Monday, October 21 | 3:30 p.m.
Artist Conversation: Harun Farocki & Trevor Paglen
National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. (off campus event)

Multimedia artists and educators, Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen of the CADVC exhibition Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki & Trevor Paglen, speak about their work focused in the investigation of military surveillance, espionage, war-making and weaponry, and its relevance in today’s geopolitical climate.

Visibility Machines explores the unique roles Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen play as meticulous observers of the global military industrial complex. Farocki and Paglen each examine the deceptive and clandestine ways in which military projects have deeply transformed—and politicized—our relationship to images and the realities they appear to represent. The exhibition initiates critical questions about the crucial part images play in revealing essential but largely concealed information, and places the oeuvres of Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen within the broader cultural and historical developments of the media they are creatively working with, namely photography, film and new media.

Video artist and filmmaker Harun Farocki addresses the primary links between technology, politics, and coercion. Establishing a critical dialogue with images, image- making, and the institutions that produce them, he reveals increasingly complex relationships between people and machines, vision and violence. Visual artist and photographer Trevor Paglen investigates the covert activities of U.S. secret military operations, collectively known as the “Black World.” Aligning himself with the study of the politics of perception, Paglen utilizes complex technologies of seeing in order to reveal the historical relationships between photography and political domination.

National Gallery of Art, East Building Auditorium
6th Street and Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC

Admission to this event, and to the National Gallery is free.

Image: Trevor Paglen, Open Hangar; Cactus Flats, NV; Distance ~ 18 miles; 10:04 a.m., 2007, C-Print, 30 x 36 in., Courtesy of Metro Pictures, Altman Siegel Gallery, and Galerie Thomas Zander


Johanna_NarratologyVisual Arts
Tuesday, October 22 | 6:00 p.m.
Johanna Drucker, Visiting Artist Lecture
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Artist of the featured exhibition, Druckworks: 40 Years of Books and Projects by Johanna Drucker, discusses her work and her career over the course of 40 years.

Artist, writer, typographic poet and scholar-critic Johanna Drucker is widely known for her contributions to contemporary art theory and history, as well as her prolific output as a creative artist. Throughout her career she has helped shape the field of artists’ books, visual poetics, and digital aesthetics in dialogue with the arts and critical issues.

Her scholarly writing documents and critiques visual language: letterforms, typography, visual poetry, art and, lately, digital aesthetics. Drucker is internationally renowned for her book art, which touches on a variety of themes, especially “the exploration of the conventions of narrative prose and the devices by which it orders, sequences, and manipulates events according to its own logic” as well as “the use of experimental typography to expand the possibilities of prose beyond the linear format of traditional presentation.”

Her work has been exhibited at universities, libraries, galleries, and museums throughout the world, including Museum of Arts and Design, Cooper-Hewitt Museum, National Museum of Women in the Arts, New York Public Library, Yale University, Columbia University, Harvard University, Art Institute of Chicago, University of the Arts (Philadelphia), and Parsons School of Design.

Drucker is currently the Martin and Bernard Breslauer Professor in the Department of Information Studies at the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at UCLA.

A free reception will follow this discussion.

Image:  Johanna Drucker, Narratology, 1994, letterpress, hand-colored images, case bound in silk-covered boards with metallic stamping, Druckwerk, 70 copies, 10” x 12”


569Humanities Forum
Wednesday, October 23 | 4:00 p.m.
“Roman Gladiatorial Spectacle,” Garrett Fagan, professor of ancient history, Penn State University
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This Humanities Forum is and Ancient Studies Week lecture. It is sponsored by the Ancient Studies Department, with co-sponors the Dresher Center for the Humanities, and the Departments of Sociology and Anthropology, History and Theatre.

Dr. Garrett Fagan of Penn State University presents the findings of his recent book, The Lure of the Arena: Social Psychology and the Crowd at the Roman Games (Cambridge University Press, 2011), a study of the social psychology of the violent spectacles of the Roman arena, which pays particular attention to the diversity of the crowd in the arena and investigates public spectacles as efforts to create unity amid great diversity.


webportraitlow-300x225Music
Wednesday, October 23 | 8:00 pm
Livewire 4: Richard Craig, Flute
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Renowned Scottish flutist Richard Craig performs a recital of contemporary music. His program will feature:

  • Fabrice Fitch: Agricola IX d for solo flute
  • James Dillon: Sgothan for solo flute
  • Evan Johnson: émoi for solo bass flute
  • Brice Pauset: Eurydice for solo flute (world premiere)
  • Richard Craig: Amp/A1 for amplified alto flute (U.S. premiere)

Active primarily as a soloist and chamber musician, Richard Craig has lectured on contemporary flute and performance throughout Europe, maintaining links with Brunel University, London, Aberdeen University and the Orpheus Instituut, Belgium. Alongside realising established repertoire, Craig is active in generating new work with composers meant to enrich the expressive range of the instrument, often working with institutions such as SWR Experimentalstudio. He is a member of SMASH ensemble and Distractfold.

Craig has recorded and broadcasted for the BBC, WDR Cologne, YLE Finland, Radio France, Radio Nacional de España, Swedish Radio, ARTE, and Icelandic RUV and WERGO. In April 2011 his solo disc, INWARD, was released on the Metier label, featuring works by Ferneyhough, Sciarrino alongside premieres recordings of Barrett, Bång, Karski, Johnson and Croft.  It has since been received to critical acclaim and the only classical nomination for the Scottish Album of the Year Award 2011, the disc was also nominated in the music category by We Are The Making. Craig is also a lecturer in the post-graduate performance program at Huddersfield University.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

VM_cadvc_img


Visual Arts
Thursday, October 24 – Saturday, February 22
Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki & Trevor Paglen
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

Visibility Machines explores the unique roles Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen play as meticulous observers of the global military industrial complex. Investigating forms of military surveillance, espionage, war-making and weaponry, Farocki and Paglen each examine the deceptive and clandestine ways in which military projects have deeply transformed—and politicized—our relationship to images and the realities they appear to represent. The exhibition initiates critical questions about the crucial part images play in revealing essential but largely concealed information, and places the oeuvres of Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen within the broader cultural and historical developments of the media they are creatively working with, namely photography, film, and new media.

Video artist and filmmaker Harun Farocki addresses the primary links between technology, politics, and coercion. Establishing a critical dialogue with images, image- making, and the institutions that produce them, he reveals increasingly complex relationships between people and machines, vision and violence. Visual artist and photographer Trevor Paglen investigates the covert activities of U.S. secret military operations, collectively known as the “Black World.” Aligning himself with the study of the politics of perception, Paglen utilizes complex technologies of seeing in order to reveal the historical relationships between photography and political domination.

Displaying the unique thematic and formal intersections between curated selections of both artists’ works, Visibility Machines is organized along a three-part structure—Vision, Observation, and Knowledge—around which the exhibition’s narrative is constructed. The first section connects theories of vision to a number of works dealing with enhanced forms of abstraction. The resulting images, which are produced with the help of machines or using advanced technological means, fluctuate between two inherent contradictions: not only that what is known is not what is seen, but also that what is seen is not all there is to be known. The second section, Observation, elaborates on the different methods Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen engage with. Presenting works resulting from extensive observation and collaboration, this part shows how both artists align themselves with scientific modes of research and the ways in which they connect observational techniques to developments in the media they are creatively engaged with. Finally, the third section, Knowledge, hints at the specific knowledge that can be generated from bringing these two substantial artistic oeuvres together. Displaying image-making as an unfolding historical process, it emphasizes both oeuvres as an inherently political project with vast aesthetic consequences.

Visual Arts
Thursday, October 24 | 5:00 p.m.
Opening Reception

A free opening reception will be held for this exhibition in the CADVC from 5 until 7 p.m.

Admission to the exhibition is free. The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and is located in the Fine Arts Building. For more information call 410-455-3188.

Click here for directions and parking information.


Livewire4Music
Thursday, October 24 | 8:00 p.m.
Livewire 4: Ruckus
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The UMBC faculty contemporary ensemble Ruckus features performers Audrey Andrist (piano), Lisa Cella (flute), Patrick Crossland (trombone), Zane Forshee (guitar), Tom Goldstein (percussion), Brian Kauffman (tuba), Maria Lambros (viola) and E. Michael Richards (clarinet), joined by student percussionists Daniel Mears and Colleen Sack. The program will include:

  • Duties of the Heart (2013) by Stuart Saunders Smith (world premiere)
  • Aldebaran (1972) by Jean Eichelberger Ivy
  • Solo pour deux (1981) by Gérard Grisey
  • A Kis Csáva (The Little Fix) (1978) by György Kurtág
  • Willow Willow (1968) by Paul Chihara

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. To order tickets in advance, order online through MissionTix.

View the complete Livewire schedule here.


eurydice-7455bTheatre
Thursday, October 24 – Sunday, October 27
Eurydice
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

BUY TICKETS

The Department of Theatre presents Eurydice by Sarah Ruhl, under the direction of Nyalls Hartman, associate professor and chair of Theatre.

A modern retelling of the classic myth of Orpheus who descends into the Underworld to retrieve his young bride, Eurydice, from Death’s amorous arms. Told from Eurydice’s point-of-view, the story follows her odyssey through the Underworld as she seeks love, meaning and rebirth. Visually stunning and poetic, the play mirrors the dreamy and sometimes treacherous landscape of Eurydice’s inner life where she can’t always remember who she is and can’t always recognize the signs along the way. As Eurydice struggles for self-knowledge, we—like the characters—discover the sacrifices that must be made to achieve a deeply meaningful love, and what happens when love is found, but remains illusory and unattainable.

Performances:
Thursday, October 24 | 8:00 p.m.
Friday, October 25 | 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 26 | 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, October 27 | 2:00 p.m.

An opening night reception for this event will take place Thursday, October 24 following the performance.

$15 general admission, $10 students and seniors.

Purchase tickets online at MissionTix.com, or at the door (cash or check only).

Matinee performances are free for UMBC students with a UMBC ID. Students may pick up their tickets from the Theatre Department Office Monday – Thursday, 10 a.m. until 4 p.m, or at the box office beginning at 1 p.m. on the day of the matinee. Limit one ticket per student.

Photos by Marlayna Demond for UMBC.


Music
Friday, October 25 | 12:00 Noon
Livewire 4: Student Concert
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Premieres of new works by UMBC student composers, performed by UMBC students.


Rahilia Hasanova

Music
Friday, October 25 | 3:00 p.m. 
Livewire 4: Rahilia Hasanova, Profile Concert
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Pianists Ruth Rose and Francesca Hurst perform the complete Fugues and Postludes by Azerbajiani composer and UMBC faculty member Rahilia Hasanova, whose work is filled “with originality and freshness of intonation.”

Rahilia Hasanova is an Azerbaijani composer of mostly orchestral and chamber works. Her music has been performed internationally, including performances in Azerbaijan, Belarus, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Russia, Switzerland, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom. In her compositions Hasanova creates a synthesis of Azerbaijanian and European music by using modern composition techniques. The figurative side of her compositions is related to Eastern philosophy and ethics, and the interaction between macro and micro spaces. She describes her compositions as construction of intonations like “a tree grows from a seed.” The characteristic feature of her creations is the dramatic culminations of both register and dynamics, which are expressed by modal-meditative development.

Ruth Rose is a pianist whose repertoire ranges from the Baroque and Romantic to the contemporary. Her playing has been praised by the international press for her “truly memorable performance,” “blooming romanticism … a deep, warm sound … rich interpretations … and a smooth singing quality.” She has performed extensively in recital, with orchestra and as a chamber musician throughout Europe, the United States and South America, appearing at prestigious venues like Merkin Hall, American University, the San Diego Repertory Theater and the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, and soloed with such ensembles as the Chamber Orchestra of Florida and the Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional of Peru. Ms Rose is also a committed performer of contemporary music, and many composers have dedicated pieces to her. She is a founding member of the renowned “Concerten tot en met” contemporary series in Amsterdam, and has performed with the Contemporary Music Forum at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C.

A Washington native, Francesca Hurst frequently performs in and around town. Recent appearances include the Kennedy Center, the Italian Embassy, and the Jordan Kitts Community Concert Series in Fairfax, Virginia. For the 2013-2014 season she has been invited to perform several concerts with the Great Noise Ensemble, a contemporary classical music group based in Washington, D.C. She also performs with the Washington Piano Society several times a year offering free concerts to the community. She received the Doctor of Musical Arts in Piano Performance from The Catholic University of America and also has a degree in Italian from Tulane University. Her teachers have included Ivo Kaltchev, Faina Lushtak and Maryen Herrett. Dr. Hurst is on the music faculty at Trinity Washington University and an adjunct professor at Catholic University, both in Washington, D.C. She maintains a thriving private piano studio, and is often invited to adjudicate various competitions.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.


fuse_ensemble_2013

Music
Friday, October 25 | 8:00 p.m.
Livewire 4: Fuse Ensemble
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Livewire presents Fuse Ensemble, a concept-based new music/new media ensemble, performing Voices of the Depths, Musings on C.G. Jung’s Red Book, with music by Eve Beglarian, Fernando Benadon, Gina Biver, Patrick Burke, Ian Boddy and Adam Kendall, a video installation by Norbert Francis Attard, as well as the poetry of Colette Inez.

Fuse Ensemble presents a new concept each season, giving voice to new music composers and creating musical happenings with visual elements of live, interactive video and/or kinetic installations. The musicians of Fuse perform on an eclectic mix of flute, clarinet, electric violin, electric guitar, cello, piano, electronic playback, percussion and invented instruments. Linked by the insane possibilities of software such as MaxMSP/Jitter and Processing, sometimes using sensors on the musicians and live interactive cameras on stage, the artists create an experience that fuses sound, video and humans into a liquefied state and gives each concept a setting — a visual and kinetic environment to experience it in that furthers communication and unifies the concept.

Fuse Ensemble is: Gina Biver, composer, director, electric guitar, electronics/laptop; Pam Clem, cello; Ethan Foote, contrabass, Martha Haines, electronic keyboards; Greg Hiser, violin; Jenny Lapple, flute; Marshall Maley, percussion; Ina Mirtcheva, piano, Angela Murakami, clarinet.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.


Music
Saturday, October 26 | 10:00 a.m.
Livewire 4: 
Reading Session
Fine Arts Building, Studio 508

Livewire presents a reading session of works by young composers from K-12 schools in Maryland, performed by the ensemble STRATA.


Music
Saturday, October 26 | 1:00 p.m.
Livewire 4:
 
Chamber Music Concert
Fine Arts Recital Hall

A chamber music concert features UMBC Department of Music faculty members Lisa Cella, Patrick Crossland, Tom Goldstein, Maria Lambros, E. Michael Richards and Kazuko Tanusaki, and the percussion quartet Umbilicus (Tom Goldstein, Shelly Purdy ’10, Will Redman ’98 and Rob Wolk ’11). Their program will include:

  • Bombardments No. 4 (1964/68) by Robert Moran
  • a (from a & b) by Makoto Moroi
  • Pastorale by Rebecca Clarke
  • Flute Code (2013) by Matthew Burtner
  • Dastan by Faranghiz Ali-Zadah
  • Hag Riding (2013) by Anna Rubin (world premiere)
  • Subterranea (2013) by Linda Dusman (world premiere)

IMG_9341 edit oneMusic
Saturday, October 26 | 4:00 p.m.
Livewire 4:
 Alastair Edmonstone, Piano
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Pianist Alastair Edmonstone performs Morton Feldman’s iconic Triadic Memories, and Piano Interiors, a world premiere by Linda Dusman.

Alastair Edmonstone has performed as soloist, chamber musician and collaborative pianist throughout the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. A native of Perth, Scotland, he received his undergraduate degree in music from Birmingham Conservatoire in England. At the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston he earned the Graduate Diploma and Master of Music degree, made possible by a generous award from the Scottish International Education Trust. A European Union Erasmus grant enabled him to partake in further study at the Royal Conservatory in Brussels, Belgium. Additionally he holds the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree (2012) from the University of Washington in Seattle. His principal teachers include Stephen Drury, Jan Michiels, Robin McCabe and Mark Racz.

An advocate of modern music, he has worked closely with composers such as Jonathan Harvey, Huck Hodge, Lee Hyla, and Gunther Schuller, and gave the Boston premiere of Schuller’s Grand Concerto for Percussion and Keyboards in 2005. Between 2008 and 2009 he presented over a dozen performances of Messiaen’s legendary piano cycle Vingt regards sur l’enfant-Jésus to mark the 100th anniversary of the composer’s birth. In 2010 he gave the Seattle premiere of Luciano Berio’s landmark 2001 work, the Sonata per pianoforte solo.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.


ensemble2Music
Saturday, October 26 | 8:00 p.m.
Livewire 4:
 STRATA: New American Music
Fine Arts Recital Hall

STRATA is a coming together of three extraordinary musical talents: Audrey Andrist, piano; Nathan Williams, clarinet; and James Stern, violin and viola. Their combined credits encompass numerous international prizes and performances across four continents including such places as Carnegie Hall, the Marlboro Festival and the Kennedy Center.

STRATA brings “deft ensemble playing” and a “talent . . . that’s worth getting worked up about” [Washington Post] to a repertoire that combines the great trio and duo repertoire of the past with an ever-growing body of new works written especially for them over the twenty years they have been playing together. Equally capable of winning over an audience with unique renderings of popular music and of making even the most complex works accessible, exciting and meaningful, STRATA has received enthusiastic repeat engagements at the Piccolo Spoleto Festival, New York’s historic Maverick Concerts and San Francisco Composers Inc, for which they were listed as one of San Francisco Classical Voice’s “highlights of 2005.” They have been resident artists at the Banff Centre for the Arts and appeared in New York City under the auspices of the International Society for Contemporary Music.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.


think_create_engage_red1Visual Arts
Wednesday, November 6 | 4:00 p.m.
Playing Un-Documented Utopias
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

Playing Un-Documented Utopias presents an overview of the Jump Over Time series with excerpts of video work by Martha Rosler, Karen Finley and Zoe Beloff as well as the presentation of two recent works: People to be Resembling (Otolith Group, UK/India, 2012, 22 minutes), “a five sided portrait of the methodologies of the post-free jazz, pre-world music trio Codona. People to be Resembling returns to 1978 in order to re-dream the recording process at Tonstudio Bauer as a meditation upon the relations between visual anthropology, anti-colonial choreography, nuclear annihilation and Weltmusik;” and Walk Through (Redmond Entwistle, USA/UK, 2013, 17 minutes), “an exploration of the site, design and philosophy of the California Institute of the Arts in Los Angeles, as a starting point for posing wider questions about contemporary pedagogical models and their relationship to new forms of social, political and economic exchange that have emerged since the 1970s.”

This screening is one of several films and performances in the series organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, Jump Over Time, curated by Joanna Raczynska ’98 of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.  Jump Over Time looks at some creative uses of video documentation as an idiom and form used by media artists. When does the video documentation of an event shift from witness to evidence? If a performance is designed for the camera is the urgency, the live-ness, of the performance obliterated?  When the video maker’s intent is to re-present a specific historic period, action, or happening, can reenactments be considered documentation? Selected works as well as visiting artists and archivists will speak to the many ways archives—brimming with mediated experiences—are critical to cultural determination, memory and practice.

Admission to this event is free.


brownphotoSocial Sciences Forum
Wednesday, November 6 | 4:00 p.m.
“Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters,” Kate Brown, Professor of History, UMBC
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This Social Sciences Forum is o-sponsored with the Department of History and the Friends of the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

UMBC Department of History Professor, Kate Brown will speak on the great plutonium disasters of the United States and the Soviet Union, drawing on official records and dozens of interviews to tell the extraordinary stories of Richland, Washington and Ozersk, Russia-the first two cities in the world to produce plutonium. To contain secrets, American and Soviet leaders created plutopias–communities of nuclear families living in highly-subsidized, limited-access atomic cities. Plutopia was successful because in its zoned-off isolation it appeared to deliver the promises of the American dream and Soviet communism; in reality, it concealed disasters that remain highly unstable and threatening today.


springdance2013-7250Dance
November 8 & 9 | 8:00 p.m. each evening
Senior Dance Concert
Studio 317, Fine Arts Building

The Department of Dance presents the Senior Dance Concert featuring choreography from Department of Dance Seniors.

$12 general admission $7 students and seniors. For information and reservations, call the Dance Box Office at 410-455-6240; order tickets online through MissionTix.


richards01Music
Sunday, November 10 | 3:00 p.m.
E. Michael Richards, Clarinet
Fine Arts Recital Hall

An afternoon performance featuring UMBC Department of Music faculty member E. Michael Richards.

As a recitalist of new music, E. Michael Richards, clarinet, has premiered over 150 works that have utilized the clarinet at performances throughout the US, Japan, Australia, and Western Europe.

E. Michael Richards is currently currently Professor and Chair of the Music Department at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, a guest artist with the Ensemble for New Music at Towson University and the Verge Ensemble (ensemble in residence at June in Buffalo 2009), and a founding member of RUCKUS (contemporary music ensemble of UMBC). He received a 2010 Individual Artist Award from the Maryland State Council of the Arts, and a 2011 USM Regents’ Faculty Award for Excellence in Research/Scholarship/Creative Activitites.


PG_13.09.30-9536Dance, Music, Visual Arts, Theatre
Monday, November 11 | 12 Noon
CIRCA Catalyst
With presenters Dr. Chris  Swan and Lynn Cazabon
Dresher Center Conference Room (216 Performing Arts and Humanities Building)

CIRCA Catalyst is an ongoing series promoting conversations around transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that fuses the performing and visual arts with other fields of inquiry and scholarship. Catalyst is presented by CIRCA, UMBC’s Center for Innovation, Research and Creativity in the Arts.

Dr. Chris Swan maintains a research and outreach collaboration with the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.  He will discuss his research on urban plant biodiversity, greening science, and informal education in the Corrections setting. The work is placed in the broader concept of urban sustainability in the Baltimore region.

Associate Professor Lynn Cazabon will discuss her in-progress project “Portrait Garden,” which has entailed working closely with the volunteer inmates at the Maryland Correctional Institute for Women that Professor Swan and his PhD student Anna Johnson trained to assist with their research. Portrait Garden is multi-part portrait of these inmates consisting of the creation of perennial gardens on the prison grounds, photographic images of the plants, and audio interviews with each woman about her past and present experiences with gardening.

A catered lunch, with vegetarian options, will be provided by CIRCA.

Presenter Bios:

Chris Swan is a biologist with a specific interest in community ecology.  He studies the processes that maintain biodiversity in space and time.  Early in his career as a graduate student at the University of Maryland, and until a few years ago, he focused mainly on rivers and streams.  Recently, Dr. Swan has broadened his attention to include pond and wetland ecosystems, as well as plants in urban environments.  He maintains a busy lab with 2 PhD students, 3 Master’s students, and an undergraduate researcher.  Dr. Swan teaches mid- to upper-level courses in ecology. See more at biodiversity.umbc.edu

Lynn Cazabon is an artist who works in a number of different media and teaches courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels in the Department of Visual Arts. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally in museums and galleries for the past 20 years and has been featured in numerous books and exhibition catalogs. Over the past 3 years, her work has directly intersected with scientific themes including a dynamic visualization of space debris tracking data, and extensive documentation of wild plants in urban environments. Learn more at Lynncazabon.com

Image by Lynn Cazabon.


David Levering Lewis

Social Sciences Forum, Humanities Forum
November 13 |  7:00 p.m.
“W.E.B. Du Bois Fifty Years after the March on Washington,” Dr. David Levering Lewis, Professor of History, New York University
University Center Ballroom

This Annual Du Bois Lecture is co-sponsored by the Department of Africana Studies, the Department of History, the Department of American Studies, the Language, Literacy and Culture Doctoral Program, the Honors College, the Dresher Center for the Humanities, the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, the Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery, and the Mosaic Center of the Office of Student Life

The author of eight books and editor of two more, Lewis’s field is comparative history with special focus on twentieth-century United States social history and civil rights.

David Levering Lewis is twice winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography, for part one and part two of his biography of W. E. B. Du Bois (in 1994 and 2001, respectively). He is the first author to win two Pulitzer Prizes for biography for back-to-back volumes.


1Visual Art
Thursday, November 14 | 6:00 p.m.
Visibility Machines: DC Art Science Evening Rendezvous
National Academy of Sciences (off campus event)

In this panel discussion related to the CADVC exhibition Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki & Trevor Paglen curated by Niels Van Tomme, DC Art Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER) explores drones.

Panelists:

  • Missy Cummings, Associate Professor, Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems; Director, HUmans and Automation Laboratory Human-Systems Engineering Track, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Thomas Keenan, Director, Human Rights Program; Associate Professor, Comparative Literature, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
  • Marko Peljhan, Artist and Professor, Interdisciplinary Studies: Art, Science, Technology, Digital Media and Space Art, Department of Art, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Peter Singer, Director, Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, The Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C.

DASER is a monthly discussion forum on art and science projects in the national capital region and beyond. DASERs provide a snapshot of the cultural environment and foster interdisciplinary networking.

National Academy of Sciences, Keck Center
500 Fifth St., NW, Rm. 100
Washington, DC

Admission to this event and the reception following the discussion is free. Pre-registration and photo ID required for entry.

Image: Harun Farocki, (Still from) Eye/Machine III, 2003, Video, color, sound, 25 min., Copyright Harun Farocki


Ittzes_134BWMusic
Sunday, November 17 | 3:00 p.m.
Gergely Ittzés, Flute
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Born in Hungary and a graduate of the Budapest Liszt Academy of Music, Gergely Ittzés is one of the most proactive personalities of the flute scene. His large repertoire includes several important works written for flute and a great number of rarities from the past centuries and today. In addition to classical and modern music, several other styles have also influenced his musical idiom, like jazz and free improvisation.

The program will feature:

  • C.P.E. Bach: Flute Sonata in A minor, H.562
  • Niccolò Paganini: Capriccio No. 24
  • László Lajtha: Deux pièces pour flute seule Op. 69
  • J. S. Bach: Partita in A Minor, BWV 1013
  • Gergely Ittzés: Echo Etude
  • Gergely Ittzés: Projections
  • Gergely Ittzés: Totem
  • Gergely Ittzés: Etude for Three Fingerings

Ittzés has given concerts and led master classes in many countries all over the world including Brazil, the United States, Canada, China and Japan and has taught extensively throughout Europe. He premiered Anthony Newman’s Flute Concerto, composed for him at the Budapest Spring Festival, 2005, and has been invited to perform at major flute festivals around the globe (Beijing, Brazília, Paris, New York, Manchester, Freiburg and many others). He is an active soloist and chamber musician, a member of the UMZE Chamber Ensemble (with which he performed in Carnegie Hall in 2009) and founder of the TeTraVERSI flute quartet. He has played together with Magdalena Kožena, Miklós Perényi, Zoltán Kocsis, Zoltán Rácz, the Amadinda Percussion Group, Barnabás Kelemen, Katalin Kokas and the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra among many others, and improvised together with Markus Stockhausen, Emil Viklický, Don Thompson, Szilárd Mezei etc. He is the principal flutist of the Erdődy Chamber Orchestra.

$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.


headshotHumanities Forum
Wednesday, November 20 | 4:00 p.m.
“Pouring Tea: Black Gay Men of The South Tell Their Tales,” E. Patrick Johnson, Carlos Montezuma Professor of Performance Studies and African American Studies, Northwestern University
University Center Ballroom

Korenman Lecture

This Humanities Forum is sponsored by the Department of Gender and Women Studies, and co-sponsored with the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

E. Patrick Johnson is the Carlos Montezuma Professor of Performance Studies and African American Studies at Northwestern University, and an Artistic Fellow at the Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media at Columbia College, Chicago. A scholar, activist and artist, Johnson performs nationally and internationally and has published widely in the areas of race, gender, sexuality and performance.

Johnson is a prolific performer and scholar, and an inspiring teacher, whose research and artistry has greatly impacted African American studies, performance studies, and sexuality studies.  He has written two award-winning books, Appropriating Blackness:  Performance and the Politics of Authenticity (Duke UP, 2003), which won the Lilla A. Heston Award, the Errol Hill Book Award, and was a finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South—An Oral History (University of North Carolina UP, 2008), which was recognized as a Stonewall Book Award Honor Book by the LGBT Round Table of the American Library Association. He co-edited Black Queer Studies—A Critical Anthology (Duke UP, 2005).

Johnson’s performance work dovetails with his written work. He toured his one-man show, Strange Fruit, an autobiographical mediation on race, gender, class, and region to over 30 college campuses from 1998 – 2003.  His staged reading, “Pouring Tea: Black Gay Men of the South Tell Their Tales” is based on his book, Sweet Tea, and has toured to over 80 college campuses from 2006 to the present.  In 2009, he translated the staged reading into a full-length stage play, Sweet Tea—The Play, which was co-produced by About Face Theater and the Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media at Columbia College, Chicago.  The play had its world premiere in April 2010 and had a month run to rave reviews. He won a Black Theatre Alliance Award for Best Solo Performance for the show.  In Fall 2011, the show had a 4-week run at Signature Theatre in Arlington, Virginia.

He was also awarded the Leslie Irene Coger Award for Outstanding Contributions to Performance by the National Communication Association, the Randy Majors Memorial Award for Outstanding Contributions to LGBT Scholarship in Communication and was inducted into the Chicago LGBT Hall of Fame—all in 2010.


rose_alexVisual Arts
Thursday, November 21 | 6:00 p.m.
Ashley John Pigford, Visting Artist Lecture
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Artist and co-organizer of the Vista Sans Wood Type ProjectAshley John Pigford, discusses the exhibition on display in the gallery. A free reception for this event will take place following the lecture.

Image: Alex Rose, Untitled, 2012, letterpress


postcard_front

Theatre
Thursday, November 21 – Sunday, November 24
Kid-Simple: A Radio Play in The Flesh
Black Box Theatre

The Department of Theatre presents Kid-Simple: A Radio Play in The Flesh by Jordan Harrison, under the direction of guest artist Michele Minnick.

Moll, girl genius, who lives with her Mother and Father in “the finest cul-de-sac of a peaceful town,” invents a machine for hearing sounds that cannot be heard. She wins the science fair, and unknowingly lets her heart, and her machine, “The Third Ear,” be stolen by an evil shape-shifting mercenary. In this quirky, thrilling, and hilarious live-performance radio play, Moll teams up with Oliver, the last boy virgin in the 11th grade, and heads off on a life-threatening adventure to rescue her invention and, with “Triple A” commercials included, save sound as we know it. Will Moll’s vibrating ossicle fall into the wrong hands? Will the virgin Oliver be seduced by the dark side? Will life as we know it be destroyed forever? Stay tuned…and tune in, as Kid-Simple weaves the worlds of radio drama, science fiction, film noir, and live-theatre into a modern fable you won’t soon forget!

“A beguiling little fantasy rooted in the notion that even the brainiest, most independent-minded girl can get seriously sidetracked by that initial rush of hormones and first love…Harrison has a fresh, vivid, poetic voice ideal for the theater.”
—Hedy Weiss, Chicago Sun-Times

Performances:
Thursday, November 21 | 8:00 p.m.
Friday, November 22 | 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, November 23 | 2:00 p.m.
Saturday, November 23 | 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, November 24 | 2:00 p.m.

$15 general admission, $10 students and seniors.

Matinee performances are free for UMBC students with a UMBC ID. Students may pick up their tickets from the Theatre Department Office Monday – Thursday, 10 a.m. until 4 p.m, or at the box office beginning at 1 p.m. on the day of the matinee. Limit one ticket per student.


Dance
Friday, November 22 | 8:00 p.m.
First Works
Fine Arts Building, Studio 317

UMBC Dance students present their choreographic work for the first time in this First Works dance concert.

Admission to First Works is free.


symphony-24Music
Sunday, November 24 | 7:30 p.m.
UMBC Symphony Orchestra
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The UMBC Symphony Orchestra performs the program, “Czech it Out!  The Musical Language of Nationalism, and the New World,” under the direction of E. Michael Richards.

Works include:

  • New World Symphony by Antonin Dvorak; this performance will also feature a beta test of the “Symphony Interactive” app for iPad.  The Symphony Interactive project, is a collaboration between the UMBC Department of Music and the Imaging Research Center.
  • Blanik by Bedrich Smetana
  • Violin Concerto by Antonin Dvorak (featuring UMBC undergraduate student, Ariel Byrd)

Admission to this performance is free.


s200_amaury_a..garciaHumanities Forum
Tuesday, November 26 | 4:00 p.m.
“Exhibiting Erotic Art (Shunga) and The Problem of Obscenity in 20th Century Japan,” Amaury Garcia, Professor, Center for Asian and African Studies, El Colegio de Mexico
Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery

This Humanities Forum is sponsored by the Department of Asian Studies and co-sponsored with the Department of Visual Arts and the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

In Japan today there is an informal prohibition against public exhibitions of erotic prints, or shunga, from the Edo period (1603-1868). For most of the 20th century they were considered obscene, and their publication was required to follow regulations stipulating that any bodily representation should be arranged or altered so that the genitals and pubic hair be kept hidden. Dr. Garcia will discuss the history of modern discourses regarding the changing nature of shunga’s multiple identities, from commodity and popular entertainment to “obscenity,” and then to “art”; that is, how they were interpreted and then censored in later periods for reasons far beyond their original cultural context.


lisaleap01-sDance
December 5 – December 7 | 8:00 p.m. each evening
Fall Dance Showcase
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

The Department of Dance presents the annual Fall Dance Showcase.

$12 general admission $7 students and seniors. For information and reservations, call the Dance Box Office at 410-455-6240; order tickets online through MissionTix.


think_create_engage_redMusic
Saturday, December 7 | 7:00 p.m.
Jubilee Singers
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the Jubilee Singers (followed immediately by the UMBC Gospel Choir) under the direction of Janice Jackson.

Admission is free.


jazzensemble02-sMusic
Sunday, December 8 | 3:00 p.m.
UMBC Jazz In Concert
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents UMBC Jazz in Concert under the direction of Matthew Belzer.

Admission is free, suggested donation $15.


ensemble_vocalartsMusic
Sunday, December 8 | 8:00 p.m.
Opera Workshop with the UMBC Camerata
Fine Arts Recital Hall

This event has been canceled because of the weather.

The Department of Music presents the Opera Workshop with special guest performers, the UMBC Camerata, under the direction of Joseph Regan and Stephen Caracciolo. The Opera Workshop is a course designed for 8 – 15 advanced vocalists, and offers students the opportunity to study stage acting, movement and character development within the sphere of musical performance.

The Camerata will perform:

Sacred Texts
Salmo 150 – Ernani Aquiar
Dies Irae(from the Gregorian Missa Pro defunctis)- Medieval anonymous
Ev’rytime I Feel the Spirit – William Dawson

Love’s Pain
The Water is Wide – arr. Joseph Flummerfelt
Il bianco e dolce cigno – Jacob Arcadelt

Movements from Larger Works
Wie lieblich sind deine Wohnugen – Johannes Brahms
from Ein Deutsches Requiem

Gloria – W. A. Mozart
from Mass in C, “Coronation”

Carols for the Season
Ding Dong! Merrily on High – arr. Charles Wood
Nova, Nova – Renaissance anonymous
In dulci Jubilo – J.S. Bach
Carol of the Bells – Mykola Leontovych
The Three Kings from Persian Lands Afar – Peter Cornelius
There Is No Rose Of Such Virtue – Stephen Caracciolo
Angels We Have Heard on High – arr. Robert Shaw

Admission is free.


e5EcSjkRBcAQEpXshdld1S6idbgeAe9l3LWFqr2X3EI,jOSTgn4txyjeG1yFnJeVwpKBt3vwtMlxwdeB0Dbc3CcMusic
Monday, December 9 | 8:00 p.m.
UMBC Wind Ensemble
Fine Arts Recital Hall

The Department of Music presents the UMBC Wind Ensemble under the direction of Brian Kaufman.

The Ensemble is comprised of exceptional woodwind, brass and percussion musicians who enjoy the challenge of performing excellent concert literature.

Admission is free.


Martha_WilsonVisual Arts
Thursday, December 12 | 7:00 p.m.
Franklin Furnace: The Art of Performance Documentation
Martha Wilson in person
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Martha Wilson is an artist and the founding director of Franklin Furnace. Wilson’s own work in photography, performance and video art explores female subjectivity through role-playing, costume transformations and “invasions” of other people’s personas.

Wilson, was a member of DISBAND, an all-female performance group, and it is in this context that she developed the character of Alexander M. Plague, Jr., one of several personas (both fictional and real; including that of Barbara Bush) that she has adopted over the years.

This performance is one of several films and performances in the series organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, Jump Over Time, curated by Joanna Raczynska ’98 of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.  Jump Over Time looks at some creative uses of video documentation as an idiom and form used by media artists. When does the video documentation of an event shift from witness to evidence? If a performance is designed for the camera is the urgency, the live-ness, of the performance obliterated?  When the video maker’s intent is to re-present a specific historic period, action, or happening, can reenactments be considered documentation? Selected works as well as visiting artists and archivists will speak to the many ways archives—brimming with mediated experiences—that are critical to cultural determination, memory and practice.

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