Category Social Sciences

Faith Hillis

Children of Rus': Ukraine and the Invention of a Russian Nation

Humanities Forum
Webb Lecture
Thursday, October 2 | 4:00 p.m.
Children of Rus': Ukraine and the Invention of a Russian Nation
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Russian national interests in Ukraine became front-page news during the recent crisis. This talk places the struggle for control of Ukraine in a broader historical context. In the 19th century, a powerful and transformative Russian nationalist movement, claiming to restore the ancient customs of the East Slavs, swept across what is today central Ukraine. By examining the role of this nineteenth century movement, Faith Hillis, an assistant professor of Russian history at the University of Chicago, will reflect on the causes of and potential solutions to the crisis in Ukraine. (Click heading for full description.)

Mark Leibovich

America’s Gilded Capital

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, October 7 | 4:00 p.m.
America’s Gilded Capital
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

Mark Leibovich, chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, talks about his best-selling account of Washington, D.C., “This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral – plus plenty of valet parking! – in America’s Gilded Capital.” The book is described by critics as a stunning and often hysterically funny examination of our ruling class’s incestuous “media industrial complex.” (Click heading for full description.)

Avind

Translating the Indian Past: The Poets’ Experience

Humanities Forum
Monday, October 13 | 4:00 p.m.
Translating the Indian Past: The Poets’ Experience
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Arvind Mehrotra, one of India’s most celebrated contemporary poets and an acclaimed translator of Indian literature, will talk about how three important Indian poets (Toru Dutt, AK Ramanujan, and Arun Kolatkar) translated the Indian classics. Toru’s translation of a Purana story would be unthinkable without her Christianity; Ramanujan’s without Modernism; and Kolatkar’s without the American idiom. These translations bring past and present together in the ongoing construction of India’s literary heritage. (Click heading for full description.)

Anthony Appiah

The Honor Code

Humanities Forum
Monday, October 20 | 5:00 p.m.
Daphne Harrison Lecture
The Honor Code
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

Philosophers spend lots of time thinking about what is right and wrong, and some time thinking about how to get people to see what is right and wrong—but almost no time thinking about how to get them to do what they know is right. Anthony Appiah has spent the last decade thinking about what it takes to turn moral understanding into moral behavior. In this talk, he explores one of the keys to real moral revolution: mobilizing the social power of honor and shame to change the world for the better. (Click heading for full description.)

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Mapping Memory: Digitizing Sherman’s March to the Sea

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, December 2 | 4:00 p.m.
Digital Humanities Initiative Event
Mapping Memory: Digitizing Sherman’s March to the Sea
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

UMBC professors Anne Sarah Rubin and Kelley Bell use the 150th anniversary of Sherman’s March to the Sea to discuss their collaboration on a digital project about this American Civil War event. Sherman’s March and America: Mapping Memory is an experiment in digital history that uses storytelling to introduce viewers to ideas about the intersections of place and memory. By showing the various approaches to one historical event—the 1864 March to the Sea—this project opens up questions about the stories that are told about the past. (Click heading for full description.)

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