Category Africana Studies

Mezzanine_849

Film Screening: Slavery by Another Name

Film Screening
Monday, February 2 | 12:00 p.m.
Wednesday, February 4 | 12:00 p.m.
Slavery by Another Name
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Slavery by Another Name explores a reality that often went unacknowledged: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted from the 1800s until World War II. Based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, the film Slavery By Another Name tells the story of black men who were forced to work as convict laborers in factories, mines, and farms. (Click on heading for full description.)

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Panel Discussion on “Slavery by Another Name”

Humanities Forum
Monday, February 9 | 4:30 p.m.
Dr. Spencer Crew, Robinson Professor of American, African American, and Public History, George Mason University
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

By 1865, despite the promise of the Thirteenth Amendment, many former slaves were not in reality free. Based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, the film Slavery By Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subject to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor – a system mostly affecting Southern black men that lasted until World War II. (Click heading for full description.)

Interior, Fort Morgan, Battle Site, Mobile Bay, Alabama, 2003

A Stirring Song Sung Heroic

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, February 24 | 4:00 p.m.
William Earle Williams, Audrey A. and John L. Dusseau Professor in the Humanities, Professor of Fine Arts, and Curator of Photography, Haverford College
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

A Stirring Song Sung Heroic features the work of photographer William Earle Williams. The history of American slavery is presented across three series of 80 black and white silver gelatin prints. These images document mostly anonymous, unheralded, and uncelebrated places in the New World—from the Caribbean to North America—where Americans black and white determined the meaning of freedom. Archives of prints, newspapers, and other ephemera related to the struggle accompany the work. (Click heading for full description.)

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