Category Social Sciences

Slavery By Another Name

Film Screening: Slavery by Another Name

Film Screening
Monday, February 2 | 12:00 p.m.
Wednesday, February 4 | 12:00 p.m.
Slavery by Another Name
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Slavery by Another Name explores a reality that often went unacknowledged: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted from the 1800s until World War II. Based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, the film Slavery By Another Name tells the story of black men who were forced to work as convict laborers in factories, mines, and farms. (Click on heading for full description.)

Slavery By Another Name

Panel Discussion on “Slavery by Another Name”

Humanities Forum
Monday, February 9 | 4:30 p.m.
Dr. Spencer Crew, Robinson Professor of American, African American, and Public History, George Mason University
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

By 1865, despite the promise of the Thirteenth Amendment, many former slaves were not in reality free. Based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, the film Slavery By Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subject to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor – a system mostly affecting Southern black men that lasted until World War II. (Click heading for full description.)

Tom Schaller

The Stronghold: How Republicans Captured Congress but Surrendered the White House

Social Sciences Forum
Wednesday, February 11 | 4:30 p.m.
Thomas Schaller, Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at UMBC
University Center 310

Once the party of presidents, the GOP in recent elections has failed to pull together convincing national majorities. Republicans have lost four of the last six presidential races and lost the popular vote in five of the last six. Newt Gingrich’s “Contract with America” set in motion a vicious cycle, Schaller contends: as the GOP became more conservative, it became more Congress-centered, and as its congressional wing grew more powerful, the party grew more conservative. (Click heading for full description.)

Peter Blair Henry

Data and Discipline: Sampling the Science of Economic Turnaround

Social Sciences Forum
Thursday, February 12 | 4:00 p.m.
Peter Blair Henry, Dean of New York University’s Stern School of Business
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The mathematical underpinnings of the “dismal science” can yield surprising results with the power to impact millions of lives around the globe. Using examples from his book, Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth, Peter Blair Henry discusses how scientific analysis of economic policy experiments can determine which policies, implemented under what conditions, create the most value for the greatest number of people. (Click heading for full description.)

Interior, Fort Morgan, Battle Site, Mobile Bay, Alabama, 2003

A Stirring Song Sung Heroic

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, February 24 | 4:00 p.m.
William Earle Williams, Audrey A. and John L. Dusseau Professor in the Humanities, Professor of Fine Arts, and Curator of Photography, Haverford College
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

A Stirring Song Sung Heroic features the work of photographer William Earle Williams. The history of American slavery is presented across three series of 80 black and white silver gelatin prints. These images document mostly anonymous, unheralded, and uncelebrated places in the New World—from the Caribbean to North America—where Americans black and white determined the meaning of freedom. Archives of prints, newspapers, and other ephemera related to the struggle accompany the work. (Click heading for full description.)

Janet Shibley Hyde

Men Are from Earth, Women Are from Earth: Science vs. the Media on Psychological Gender Differences

Social Sciences Forum
Wednesday, March 4 | 4:00 p.m.
Janet Shibley Hyde, Evjue-Bascom Professor & Helen Thompson Woolley Professor of Psychology and Gender & Women’s Studies and Director at the Center for Research on Gender & Women at the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Albin. O Kuhn Library Gallery

The media portray psychological differences between women and men as large and biologically determined—men are from Mars, women are from Venus. Dr. Hyde’s research uses the statistical method of meta-analysis to investigate whether these claims are accurate. The results are surprising. (Click heading for full description.)

Daniel Byman

The Middle East in Flames

Social Sciences Forum
Wednesday, March 25 | 4:30 p.m.
Daniel Byman, Senior Fellow and Director of Research at the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution and Professor in the Security Studies Program in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and the Department of Government at Georgetown University
University Center 312

The Middle East has gone from bad to worse. Four countries are in full-fledged civil wars, and the contagion might spread. Professor Byman will speak on perennial problems like the Israeli-Palestinian dispute and the Iranian nuclear program as well as the range of new crises engulfing the region. (Click heading for full description.)

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