Category Humanities Forum

Tyler Jo Smith

Revel Without a Cause? Dance, Performance, and Greek Vase Painting

Humanities Forum
Wednesday, November 5 | 4:00 p.m.
Ancient Studies Week
Tyler Jo Smith, Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology, University of Virginia
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Greek vases have much to teach us about ancient dance and performance. But how do the figures decorating ancient drinking cups and mixing bowls relate to the dances documented by the ancient authors? This talk explores the unique connection between these two important art forms, and reveals the ways they have been understood by scholars over the past 100 years. From drinking games to party tricks, we will explore the context of ancient dance and the special place of vases in performance history. (Click heading for full description.)

Helen Zia

Civil Rights, Asian Americans and Marriage Equality: 50 Years After the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Humanities Forum
Wednesday, November 19 | 6:00 p.m.
Helen Zia, Author and Former Executive Editor of Ms. Magazine
University Center, Room 312

50 years after the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 was signed, Americans are more diverse than those lawmakers could have imaged. Through personal stories from her experiences as an Asian American, feminist and LGBT writer and activist, Helen Zia explores what other evils are lurking as “minorities” become the majority in these contemporary times that some call “post-Civil Rights,” and she considers the opportunities for all communities to move forward together. (Click heading for full description.)

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Mapping Memory: Digitizing Sherman’s March to the Sea

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, December 2 | 4:00 p.m.
Digital Humanities Initiative Event
Anne Sarah Rubin, Associate Professor of History and Director of the Center for Digital History and Education, UMBC, and Kelley Bell, Assistant Professor of Visual Arts, UMBC
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

UMBC professors Anne Sarah Rubin and Kelley Bell use the 150th anniversary of Sherman’s March to the Sea to discuss their collaboration on a digital project about this American Civil War event. Sherman’s March and America: Mapping Memory is an experiment in digital history that uses storytelling to introduce viewers to ideas about the intersections of place and memory. By showing the various approaches to one historical event—the 1864 March to the Sea—this project opens up questions about the stories that are told about the past. (Click heading for full description.)

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