Category Humanities

Slavery By Another Name

Film Screening: Slavery by Another Name

Film Screening
Monday, February 2 | 12:00 p.m.
Wednesday, February 4 | 12:00 p.m.
Slavery by Another Name
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Slavery by Another Name explores a reality that often went unacknowledged: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted from the 1800s until World War II. Based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, the film Slavery By Another Name tells the story of black men who were forced to work as convict laborers in factories, mines, and farms. (Click on heading for full description.)

Slavery By Another Name

Panel Discussion on “Slavery by Another Name”

Humanities Forum
Monday, February 9 | 4:30 p.m.
Dr. Spencer Crew, Robinson Professor of American, African American, and Public History, George Mason University
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

By 1865, despite the promise of the Thirteenth Amendment, many former slaves were not in reality free. Based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, the film Slavery By Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subject to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor – a system mostly affecting Southern black men that lasted until World War II. (Click heading for full description.)

Franchesca Ramsey

Franchesca Ramsey: “Your Powerful Online Voice: Social Media for Social Change”

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, February 17 | 7:30 p.m.
Critical Social Justice: Creating Brave Spaces
Franchesca Ramsey, vlogger
University Center Ballroom

Vlogger Franchesca Ramsey discusses her approach to harnessing the power of social media across multiple platforms in order to engage in meaningful dialogues about social justice. Inspired by her interactions with other prominent social justice bloggers, Ramsey critiques the toxic “call-out culture” that pervades many social justice communities and explores alternative approaches to demanding accountability in online spaces. (Click heading for full description.)

Interior, Fort Morgan, Battle Site, Mobile Bay, Alabama, 2003

A Stirring Song Sung Heroic

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, February 24 | 4:00 p.m.
William Earle Williams, Audrey A. and John L. Dusseau Professor in the Humanities, Professor of Fine Arts, and Curator of Photography, Haverford College
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

A Stirring Song Sung Heroic features the work of photographer William Earle Williams. The history of American slavery is presented across three series of 80 black and white silver gelatin prints. These images document mostly anonymous, unheralded, and uncelebrated places in the New World—from the Caribbean to North America—where Americans black and white determined the meaning of freedom. Archives of prints, newspapers, and other ephemera related to the struggle accompany the work. (Click heading for full description.)

Janet Shibley Hyde

Men Are from Earth, Women Are from Earth: Science vs. the Media on Psychological Gender Differences

Social Sciences Forum
Wednesday, March 4 | 4:00 p.m.
Janet Shibley Hyde, Evjue-Bascom Professor & Helen Thompson Woolley Professor of Psychology and Gender & Women’s Studies and Director at the Center for Research on Gender & Women at the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Albin. O Kuhn Library Gallery

The media portray psychological differences between women and men as large and biologically determined—men are from Mars, women are from Venus. Dr. Hyde’s research uses the statistical method of meta-analysis to investigate whether these claims are accurate. The results are surprising. (Click heading for full description.)

think_create_engage_red1

There is a Crack in Everything: That’s How the Light Gets in

Humanities Forum
Wednesday, March 4 | 7:00 p.m.
Michael Rakowitz, Professor, Art Theory & Practice, Northwestern University
Performing Arts and Humanities Building, Room 132

Artist Michael Rakowitz discusses his work in the context of hope and antagonism, and at the intersection of problem solving and trouble-making. Rakowitz’s interventions in urban spaces extend from paraSITE (1998 – ongoing), in which the artist builds inflatable shelters for homeless people that attach to the exterior vents of a building’s HVAC system, to Minaret (2001 – ongoing), in which access is gained to rooftops in Western cities and the Islamic call to prayer is sounded. (Click heading for full description.)

Gaby Pacheco

“The Paths We Make as We Go:” the Narrative of an Undocumented Immigrant Woman in the U.S.

Humanities Forum
Wednesday, March 11 | 4:00 p.m.
Joan S. Korenman Lecture
Maria Gabriela “Gaby” Pacheco, immigrant rights activist
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Activist Maria Gabriela Pacheco is a prominent figure in the national immigrant rights movement and is the program director of TheDream.US, a national organization that provides higher education fellowship opportunities for undocumented immigrants. Pacheco is a leading advocate for the passage of comprehensive immigration reform, which would assist the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the U.S. She is also a staunch advocate for legislative reform that would provide higher education access to thousands of undocumented youths. (Click heading for full description.)

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