Category Humanities

Sonia Nazario

An Evening with Sonia Nazario, author, Enrique’s Journey

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, September 23 | 7:00 p.m.
Sonia Nazario, Author, Enrique’s Journey
University Center Ballroom, University Center (3rd Floor)

Sonia Nazario, author of the national bestseller, Enrique’s Journey, recounts the odyssey of a Honduran boy who braves unimaginable hardship to reach his mother in the United States. Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won her two Pulitzer Prizes, Enrique’s Journey is the timeless story of families torn apart, the yearning to be together again, and a boy who will risk his life to find the mother he loves. Enrique’s Journey is the selection for UMBC’s new student book experience. (Click heading for full description.)

Faith Hillis

Children of Rus': Ukraine and the Invention of a Russian Nation

Humanities Forum
Webb Lecture
Thursday, October 2 | 4:00 p.m.
Faith Hillis, Assistant Professor of Russian History, The University of Chicago
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Russian national interests in Ukraine became front-page news during the recent crisis. This talk places the struggle for control of Ukraine in a broader historical context. In the 19th century, a powerful and transformative Russian nationalist movement, claiming to restore the ancient customs of the East Slavs, swept across what is today central Ukraine. By examining the role of this nineteenth century movement, Faith Hillis, an assistant professor of Russian history at the University of Chicago, will reflect on the causes of and potential solutions to the crisis in Ukraine. (Click heading for full description.)

Mark Leibovich

America’s Gilded Capital

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, October 7 | 4:00 p.m.
Mark Leibovich, Chief National Correspondent, New York Times Magazine
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

Mark Leibovich, chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, talks about his best-selling account of Washington, D.C., “This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral – plus plenty of valet parking! – in America’s Gilded Capital.” The book is described by critics as a stunning and often hysterically funny examination of our ruling class’s incestuous “media industrial complex.” (Click heading for full description.)

Avind

Translating the Indian Past: The Poets’ Experience

Humanities Forum
Monday, October 13 | 4:00 p.m.
Arvind Krishna Mehrotra, Poet, Anthologist, Literary Critic and Translator
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Arvind Mehrotra, one of India’s most celebrated contemporary poets and an acclaimed translator of Indian literature, will talk about how three important Indian poets (Toru Dutt, AK Ramanujan, and Arun Kolatkar) translated the Indian classics. Toru’s translation of a Purana story would be unthinkable without her Christianity; Ramanujan’s without Modernism; and Kolatkar’s without the American idiom. These translations bring past and present together in the ongoing construction of India’s literary heritage. (Click heading for full description.)

Photo: Ken Wyner

Performing Arts and Humanities Building Grand Opening

Arts & Humanities
Friday, October 17 | 3:00 p.m.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Grand Opening
Concert Hall and other locations in the PAHB

Hold the date! The campus community and the public are cordially invited to attend the grand opening of the Performing Arts and Humanities Building on Friday, October 17. At 3:00 p.m., an official ribbon cutting ceremony will be held in the Recital Hall, followed by a reception, building tours, performances and rehearsals. A detailed schedule will be available soon. (Click heading for full description.)

Anthony Appiah

The Honor Code

Humanities Forum
Monday, October 20 | 5:00 p.m.
Daphne Harrison Lecture
Kwame Anthony Appiah, Philosopher, Cultural Theorist and Novelist
Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theatre

Philosophers spend lots of time thinking about what is right and wrong, and some time thinking about how to get people to see what is right and wrong—but almost no time thinking about how to get them to do what they know is right. Anthony Appiah has spent the last decade thinking about what it takes to turn moral understanding into moral behavior. In this talk, he explores one of the keys to real moral revolution: mobilizing the social power of honor and shame to change the world for the better. (Click heading for full description.)

mathematics_of_human_final_no_date

The Mathematics of Being Human

Interdisciplinary
Tuesday, November 4 | 4:00 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.
The Mathematics of Being Human
Black Box Theatre, Performing Arts and Humanities Building

A provocative new play by UMBC professors Michele Osherow (English, Folger Theatre) and Manil Suri (Mathematics, author of The Death of Vishnu), directed by Alan Kreizenbeck (Theatre).

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