Category Humanities

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Anders Winroth: The Glory of the Viking Ship

Interdisciplinary
Thursday, February 26 | 4:00 p.m.
Anders Winroth: The Glory of the Viking Ship
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The Medieval & Early Modern Studies Minor presents an Annual Colloquium on Thursday, February 26, featuring Dr. Anders Winroth of Yale University’s Department of History. Dr. Winroth will speak on “The Glory of the Viking Ship” from 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. Challenging conventional wisdom about Viking violence, he will show how the Vikings developed extraordinary arts and literature but also capitalized upon the longship, using it to venture to Europe for plunder, to open new trade routes and settle in lands as distant as Russia, Greenland, and the Byzantine Empire. Catered reception to follow. (Click on heading for complete information.)

Suki Kim

“Without You, There Is No Us” — Undercover in North Korea

Asian Studies Lecture and Book Signing
Tuesday, March 3 | 7:00 p.m.
Suki Kim, Award-Winning Journalist
Albin O. Kuhn Library 7th Floor

In this talk, Suki Kim, an award-winning journalist, will discuss her book Without You, There Is No Us. A New York Times bestseller and already in its sixth printing since its publication three months ago, Without You, There Is No Us: My Time with the Sons of North Korea’s Elite is an investigative nonfiction work and expose of life in North Korea and one of its elite schools. (Click heading for full description.)

Janet Shibley Hyde

Men Are from Earth, Women Are from Earth: Science vs. the Media on Psychological Gender Differences

Social Sciences Forum
Wednesday, March 4 | 4:00 p.m.
Janet Shibley Hyde, Evjue-Bascom Professor & Helen Thompson Woolley Professor of Psychology and Gender & Women’s Studies and Director at the Center for Research on Gender & Women at the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Albin. O Kuhn Library Gallery

The media portray psychological differences between women and men as large and biologically determined—men are from Mars, women are from Venus. Dr. Hyde’s research uses the statistical method of meta-analysis to investigate whether these claims are accurate. The results are surprising. (Click heading for full description.)

Raskowitz

There is a Crack in Everything: That’s How the Light Gets in

Humanities Forum
Wednesday, March 4 | 7:00 p.m.
Michael Rakowitz, Professor, Art Theory & Practice, Northwestern University
Performing Arts and Humanities Building, Room 132

Artist Michael Rakowitz discusses his work in the context of hope and antagonism, and at the intersection of problem solving and trouble-making. Rakowitz’s interventions in urban spaces extend from paraSITE (1998 – ongoing), in which the artist builds inflatable shelters for homeless people that attach to the exterior vents of a building’s HVAC system, to Minaret (2001 – ongoing), in which access is gained to rooftops in Western cities and the Islamic call to prayer is sounded. (Click heading for full description.)

Gaby Pacheco

“The Paths We Make as We Go:” the Narrative of an Undocumented Immigrant Woman in the U.S.

Humanities Forum
Wednesday, March 11 | 4:00 p.m.
Joan S. Korenman Lecture
Maria Gabriela “Gaby” Pacheco, immigrant rights activist
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Activist Maria Gabriela Pacheco is a prominent figure in the national immigrant rights movement and is the program director of TheDream.US, a national organization that provides higher education fellowship opportunities for undocumented immigrants. Pacheco is a leading advocate for the passage of comprehensive immigration reform, which would assist the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the U.S. She is also a staunch advocate for legislative reform that would provide higher education access to thousands of undocumented youths. (Click heading for full description.)

Miriam Solomon

Four Types of Feminist Empiricism

Humanities Forum
Thursday, March 26 | 4:00 p.m.
Evelyn Barker Memorial Lecture
Miriam Solomon, Chair and Professor of Philosophy, Temple University
University Center, Room 312

“Feminist empiricism” is a general term for a range of positions in philosophy of science that aim to combine empirical methods with the insights of feminism. This talk will give an overview of feminist empiricist work in the natural and social sciences in order to showcase four different ways in which feminist critique can improve scientific work. The relationship between the different feminist empiricisms and feminist standpoint theory will also be discussed. (Click heading for full description.)

Rebecca Adelman

Microscopic War: Fragmenting Vision in Contemporary American Militarism

Humanities Forum
Thursday, April 9 | 4:00 p.m.
Rebecca Adelman, Assistant Professor, Media and Communication Studies, UMBC
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Editors manipulate the tiniest elements of digital images to obscure combat atrocities. The U.S. Army invests billions in a pixelated camouflage pattern to keep soldiers safely invisible. The NSA disaggregates human targets into miniscule bits of information. These seemingly disparate phenomena comprise a microscopic approach to militarization. Converging to fragment our view of the violence of war, they raise urgent questions about what it means to be spectators, subjects, and citizens. (Click heading for full description.)

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