Category Humanities


In Comis Veritas: The Principles of Ancient Roman Hairdress

Humanities Forum, Ancient Studies Week
Janet Stephens, independent scholar and hairstylist
Wednesday, October 14 | 4 pm
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Through her groundbreaking research, professional hairdresser and self-trained experimental archaeologist Janet Stephens rediscovered the methods used to recreate ancient Roman hairstyles using only natural hair rather than wigs, as was previously believed to have been worn. In this lecture and demonstration she will explain the universal rules governing hair behavior so that you too may recognize the truth in any hairstyle, ancient Roman or modern. (Click heading for full description.)


The Republic of the Unlettered: Intellectual History, the Enlightenment, and the Law in the Spanish Empire

Humanities Forum, Webb Lecture
Bianca Premo, associate professor of history, Florida International University
Wednesday, October 21 | 4 pm
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This talk explores what it means to write an intellectual history of the Enlightenment among people who could not read or write—namely enslaved people, women, and the indigenous inhabitants of the colonial Spanish America who sued in royal courts during the eighteenth century. (Click heading for full description.)

Educating for Insurgency

Educating for Insurgency: Youth Organizing and the Baltimore Algebra Project

Social Sciences Forum
Jay Gillen, teacher, Baltimore City Public Schools
Wednesday, October 28 | 4:30 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Jay Gillen and young people of The Baltimore Algebra Project will lead a discussion on ways students and adults in schools of poverty can see themselves as actors on the national stage, building towards insurgency from the “crawl space” of their classrooms. (Click heading for full description.)

Ann Pancake

2015-2016 English Reading Series: Reading and Book Signing by Ann Pancake

English, reading and book signing
Ann Pancake, author
Thursday, October 29 | 5 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Ann Pancake grew up in Romney and Summersville, West Virginia. Her new short story collection, Me and My Daddy Listen to Bob Marley, was published in February 2015 with Counterpoint Press.

Her first novel, Strange As This Weather Has Been (Counterpoint 2007), features a West Virginia family devastated by mountaintop removal mining. Based on interviews and real events, the novel was one of Kirkus Review’s Top Ten Fiction Books of 2007, won the 2007 Weatherford Award, and was a finalist for the 2008 Orion Book Award. (Click heading for full description.)

Erik Angner

When and Why Subjective Well-Being Matters

Social Sciences Forum
Erik Angner, associate professor of philosophy, economics, and public policy, George Mason University
Thursday, November 5 | 4 p.m.
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The so-called science of happiness — the systematic empirical study of happiness, understood as a subjectively experienced mental state — is both politically controversial and philosophically interesting. Erik Angner will discuss under what conditions such a measure of happiness can serve as a proxy for well-being. (Click heading for full description.)

Dinaw Mengestu, Paris, 06/2007 © Mathieu Zazzo

W.E.B. Du Bois Lecture: Linked Fates and Great Expectations: Revisiting Post-Colonial Africa and African-American Life through Diasporic Literature

Humanities Forum
Dinaw Mengestu, MacArthur Fellow, acclaimed novelist, and professor of English, Brooklyn College
Wednesday, November 11 | 7 pm
Performing Arts and Humanities Building, Earl and Darielle Linehan Concert Hall

The author of three novels, Dinaw Mengestu was named a “20 under 40” writer by The New Yorker magazine and received the National Book Award Foundation’s “5 under 35” award for his debut novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears. (Click heading for full description.)


China’s Forgotten Gated Communities

Humanities Forum
Tong Lam, photographer and associate professor of history, University of Toronto
Wednesday, November 18 | 5:30 pm
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

In post-socialist China, gated communities have become conspicuous symbols of affluence for the country’s rising middle class amid the so-called “economic miracle.” However, Chinese cities also have many not-so-visible neighborhoods with mostly low-income migrant workers from the countryside that are physically being gated off in the name of urban beautification and social management. (Click heading for full description.)


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 82 other followers