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Visual Arts
August 27 – December 17
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

This exhibition presents photographs made over the span of more than a decade by Sambunaris as she traversed the United States, stopping to photograph phenomena ubiquitous and familiar to particular regions but anomalous to the ordinary eye. Acting as both document and metaphor for the American experience, Sambunaris’s photographs bring into view the vast, open-ended mystery and unease of a country where human intervention and natural beauty inspire wonder in equal measure. (Click heading for full description.)

Rogers Smith

Social Sciences Forum
Wednesday, September 17 | 4:30 p.m.
Rogers M. Smith, Associate Dean for the Social Sciences and Chair of the University of Pennsylvania’s Program on Democracy, Citizenship, and Constitutionalism
Albin O. Kuhn Library, 7th floor

The author of seven books on citizenship and equality in the United States, including one that was a finalist for the 1998 Pulitzer Prize in History, Dr. Smith will address why America’s political leaders avoid discussing racial policies, even as many forms of racial inequality persist and deepen. Smith argues that the United States is profoundly divided between two rival conceptions of civic equality–but that common ground may be found in the bold views of the Constitution’s purposes advanced by Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. (Click heading for full description.)

Stephen Ross

Social Sciences Forum
Thursday, September 18 | 4:00 p.m.
Stephen F. Ross, Director, Penn State Institute for Sports Law, Policy, and Research, Penn State University Dickinson School of Law
University Center, Room 312

When Major League Baseball instituted its amateur draft in 1966, elite players honed their sills in widely available competitions organized by high schools and the American Legion. Today, virtually all North American youth selected in the draft or offered major college scholarships must join private, elite, and expensive traveling teams to display their talent. In contrast, MLB teams spend millions to train poor Latin American kids in academies, because these young men are not subject to the draft. Professor Ross will propose modifications to create economic incentives for MLB teams to invest in domestic academies for youth unable to afford private teams. (Click heading for full description.)

Photo credit Collier Schorr

Humanities Forum, Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Digital Humanities Initiative Event
Thursday, September 18 | 5:30 p.m.
Mark Tribe, artist
Albin O. Kuhn Library 7th Floor

Artist, author, and curator Mark Tribe considers the ways in which landscape images are used to expand territories and defend geopolitical interests. Working indoors, Tribe uses software to generate panoramic outdoor landscape photographs from a “drone’s eye” perspective. Tribe’s photographs suggest that the machinic perspective of unmanned devices produces compelling images that play an influential role in contemporary culture. (Click heading for full description.)

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Music
Friday, September 19 | 12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
Charlotte Hug, violist/composer/visual artist, High Zero workshop
Music Box (151 Performing Arts and Humanities Building)

In partnership with the High Zero festival, UMBC presents a workshop by violist/composer/visual artist Charlotte Hug. (Click on heading for full description.)

Sonia Nazario

Humanities Forum
Tuesday, September 23 | 7:00 p.m.
Sonia Nazario, Author, Enrique’s Journey
University Center Ballroom, University Center (3rd Floor)

Sonia Nazario, author of the national bestseller, Enrique’s Journey, recounts the odyssey of a Honduran boy who braves unimaginable hardship to reach his mother in the United States. Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won her two Pulitzer Prizes, Enrique’s Journey is the timeless story of families torn apart, the yearning to be together again, and a boy who will risk his life to find the mother he loves. Enrique’s Journey is the selection for UMBC’s new student book experience. (Click heading for full description.)

Faith Hillis

Humanities Forum
Webb Lecture
Thursday, October 2 | 4:00 p.m.
Faith Hillis, Assistant Professor of Russian History, The University of Chicago
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Russian national interests in Ukraine became front-page news during the recent crisis. This talk places the struggle for control of Ukraine in a broader historical context. In the 19th century, a powerful and transformative Russian nationalist movement, claiming to restore the ancient customs of the East Slavs, swept across what is today central Ukraine. By examining the role of this nineteenth century movement, Faith Hillis, an assistant professor of Russian history at the University of Chicago, will reflect on the causes of and potential solutions to the crisis in Ukraine. (Click heading for full description.)

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